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Rice University 



GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

for the 

Academic Year 1968-1969 
September, 1968 



William Marsh Rice 
University 

GENERAL 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

for the 
Academic Year 1968-69 




FOUNDED BY WILLIAM MARSH RICE 

OPENED FOR THE RECEPTION OF STUDENTS IN THE 
AUTUMN OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWELVE 

DEDICATED TO THE ADVANCEMENT 
OF LETTERS, SCIENCE, AND ART 

Houston, Texas 
1968 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/riceuniversityge196869hous 



Contents 



Academic Calendar v 
Part One. Administration and Staff 

Officers of Administration 3 

Board of Governors 4 

The Rice University Associates 5 

The Rice University Research Sponsors 8 

The College Masters 9 

The Instructional and Research Staff 10 

University Standing Committees 38 

Part Two. General Information 

Historical Sketch of the University 43 

The University Campus and Facilities 45 

Chairs and Lectureships 47 

Part Three. Information for Undergraduates 

Curricula and Degrees 53 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Programs 63 

Academic Regulations 66 

Admission of New Students 71 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 77 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 80 

Academic Honors and Awards 88 

Student Life 91 

Part Four. Information for Graduate Students 

General Information 99 

Areas of Study and Degrees 99 

Requirements for Professional Degrees 100 

Requirements for Research Degrees 100 

Admission to Graduate Study 102 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 104 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 105 

Graduate Student Life 108 

Part Five. Courses of INvStruction hi 

Index 245 

iii 



1968 


1969 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


S M T W T F S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


6 






1 2 3 


4 


12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


5 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


19 


20 


21 22 23 24 


25 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 




26 


27 


28 29 30 31 




27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 






FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


3 








1 


1 2 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 


24 


25 26 27 28 




24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

SEPTEMBER 


SEPTEMBER 








MARCH 




S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 








1 


12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 




23 


24 


25 26 27 28 


29 


28 29 30 






30 31 








OCTOBER 








APRIL 




OCTOBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


5 






12 3 4 


5 


12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


20 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


27 28 29 30 31 




27 


28 


29 30 




26 27 28 29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 








MAY 




NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 






1 2 


3 


1 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


4 


5 


6 7 8 9 


10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


11 


12 


13 14 15 16 


17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


18 


19 


20 21 22 23 


24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


25 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

DECEMBER 


DECEMBER 








JUNE 




S M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 


1 


2 


3 4 5 6 


7 


12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 


8 


9 


10 11 12 13 


14 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 


21 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


22 


23 


24 25 26 27 


28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 




29 30 






28 29 30 31 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1968-69 



First Semester 



Monday, August 26 



Saturday, August 31 
Thursday, September 5 
Wednesday, November 27 

Monday, December 2 
Friday, December 13 
Saturday, December 14 

Monday, December 16 



Last Day for Payment of First Semester 
Fees, Except for New Students 

Arrival of Freshmen 

Opening of Courses, 8:00 a.m. 

Beginning of Thanksgiving Recess, 
6:00 P.M 

Resumption of Courses, 8:00 a.m. 

Last Day of Classes 

Last Day for Filing Course Registration 
for Second Semester 

Beginning of Examinations 



Second Semester 



Wednesday, January 2 

Monday, January 6 
Saturday, March 8 
Monday, March 17 
Thursday, April 3 
Tuesday, April 8 
Saturday, April 26 
Tuesday, April 29 
Wednesday, May 14 

Friday, May 16 
Saturday, May 17 



Last Day for Payment of Second Semester 

Fees 
Opening of Courses, 8:00 a.m. 
Beginning of Spring Recess, 12:00 noon 
Resumption of Courses, 8:00 a.m. 
Beginning of Easter Recess, 6:00 p.m. 
Resumption of Courses, 8:00 a.m. 
Last Day of Classes 
Beginning of Examinations 
Last Day for Current Students to File 

Course Registrations for 1969-70 
Baccalaureate Exercises 
Fifty-Sixth Commencement 



June-July 



Summ,er, 1969 

Teaching Apprentice Session 



Part One 

Administration and Staff 

Officers o£ Administration 

Board o£ Governors 

The Rice University Associates 

The Rice University Research Sponsors 

The College Masters 

The Instructional and Research Staff 

University Standing Committees 



Officers of Administration 



Kenneth Sanborn Pitzer, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D. 
President 

C^AREY Croneis, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Sc, D.Eng., L.H.D. 

Chancellor 

William Vermillion Houston, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D. 

Honorary Chancellor 

George Holmes Richter, Ph.D. 

Dean of Graduate Studies 

William Edwin Gordon, Ph.D. 
Dean of Engineering and Science 

Virgil William Topazio, Ph.D. 

Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Michael Vincent McEnany^ M.A. 

Dean of Undergraduate Affairs 

William Wayne Caudill, M.Arch., LL.D. 
Director of School of Architecture 

Paul Edwin Pfeiffer, Ph.D. 

Dean of Students 

Hallie Beth Poindexter, Ed.D. 
Associate Dean of Students 

James Bernard Giles, M.A. 
Director of Admissions 

James Caddall Morehead, Jr., B.Arch 

Registrar 

Leo Sam Shamblin 
Treasurer 

James Redding Sims, Ph.D. 
Campus Business Manager 

Richard Francis Dini, B.S. 

Assistant to the President for Development 

Lucian Minor Wilkens, B.A. 
Financial Aid Officer 

Robert Howard Bunger, B.A. 

Assistant to the President 



Board of Governors 



Trustees 

H. Malcolm Lovett, Chairman 

Herbert Allen, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. William P. Hobby 

J. Hugh Liedtke 

Jack C. Pollard 

H. Gardiner Symonds 

James U. Teague 

Trustees Emeriti 

George R. Brown 

Daniel R. Bullard 

John S. Ivy 

William A. Kirkland 

J. Newton Rayzor 

Gus S. Wortham 

Term Members 

E. D. Butcher 

Charles W. Duncan, Jr. 

J. W. McLean 

Ralph S. O'Connor 

Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 

Harry K. Smith 

Governor Advisors 

Francis T. Fendley 

James W. Hargrove 

Howard B. Keck 

Wendel D. Ley 

Mason G. Lockwood 

John W. Mecom 
John D. Simpson, Jr. 

John R. Suman 
Milton R. Underwood 
James O. Winston, Jr. 
Benjamin N, Woodson 

4 



The Rice University Associates 



Mr. and Mrs. James S. Abercrombie 
Mr. and Mrs. K. S. Adams, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe L. Allbritton 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Allen 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Leland Anderson 
Mrs. Forrest L. Andrews 
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Arnold 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Evans Attwell 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Austin 
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Bailey 
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Baird 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Baker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Browne Baker 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Barnhart 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Barrow 
Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Bartle 
Mrs. Joe D. Beasley 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Beissner 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert P. Beutel 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Blaffer 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Bond 
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Boone 
Mr. and Mrs. James L. Britton 
Mr. and Mrs. Issaac S. Brochstein 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip H. Broun 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Hart Brown 
Mr. D. R. Bullard 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Burrow 
Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Butcher 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Butler 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Bybee 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Bybee 
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis K. Canter 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Carruth 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Merlyn Christie 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. S. Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart P. Coleman 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond A. Cook 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Cooper 



Mr. and Mrs. John H. Crooker 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Crooker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Crosswell, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd K, Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Decker 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. de Menil 
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Duncan, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmund M. Dupree 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins, Jr. 
Mrs. Joseph W. Evans 
Mrs. W. S. Farish 
Mrs. William G. Farrington 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Fay 
Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Fendley 
Mrs. Walter W. Fondren 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles I. Francis 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Frankel 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Franzheim, 

II 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert J. Frensley 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Gonzalez 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Gray 
Mrs. George L. Gudenrath 
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil R. Haden 
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Haden, II 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Hall 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Hamilton 
Mr. and Mrs. David Hannah, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Hargrove 
Mr, and Mrs. James H. Hargrove 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl F. Hasselmann 
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Heinen 
Mr. and Mrs, Wilbur E. Hess 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hirsch 
Mrs. William P. Hobby 
Mr. and Mrs. William P. Hobby, Jr. 
Mr. Roy Hofheinz 
Miss Ima Hogg 



5 



WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Mr. and Mrs. Oscar F. Holcombe 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Holland 
Reverend and Mrs. Harry N. 

Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. Claude E. Hooton, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Horton 
Mr. and Mrs. Lynn G. Howell 
Mr. Edward J. Hudson 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy M. Huffington 
Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ivy 
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Johnson, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gaylord Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Willard M. Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard B. Keck 
Mrs. Edward W. Kelley 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kelley, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Kirkland 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl M. Knapp 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore N. Law 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Griffith Lawhon 
Mrs. J. Sayles Leach 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Letzerich 
Mr. and Mrs. Wendel D. Ley 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Levine 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Liedtke 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Burton Liese 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Link, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Lloyd, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mason G. Lockwood 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto J. Lottman 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Malcolm Lovett 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lyres, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Lynch 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Maurice McAshan, 

Mr. and Mrs. O. J. McCullough 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. McCul- 
lough 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Thomas McDer- 

mott 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McLean 
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Maginnis 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Maker 
Mrs. Francis H. Maloney 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Marshall, 
II 



Mr. and Mrs. Harris Masterson, III 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Mecom 
Mr. and Mrs. John S. Mellinger 
Mr. Leopold L. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Michaux 
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Montrose 
Mr. and Mrs. Dan M. Moody 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvin C. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley C. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. William T. Moran 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Naylor 
Mrs. Wheeler Nazro 
Mr. Fred M. Nelson 
Mr. and Mrs. ATillard K. Neptune 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr. 
Mrs. Mary Moody Northen 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. O'Connor 
Mr. and Mrs. Gustav M. O'Keiff 
Mr. and Mrs. Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Peterkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack C. Pollard 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed^vard Randall, III 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Newton Rayzor 
Mr. Jess Newton Rayzor 
Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Reckling, III 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Reed 
Mr. and Mrs. Fisher Reynolds 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond D. Reynolds 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Riddell, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Rothrock 
Mr. and Mrs. Clive Runnells, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick R. Ruther- 
ford 
Mr. and Mrs. Fayez Sarofim 
Dr. and Mrs. Irving Schweppe, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eddy C. Scurlock 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Sharp 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Shartle 
Mrs. James L. Shepherd, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Sherar 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Joe Shimek 
Mr. and Mrs. Irvin M. Shlenker 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Simpson 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert K. Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Cabanne Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry K. Smith 
Mr. William A. Smith 



THE RICE UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATES 



Mr. and Mrs. W. McIver Streetman 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Stude 

Mr. and Mrs. John Robert Suman 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Gardiner Symonds 

Mr. and Mrs. Williston B. Symonds 

Mr. Ben Taub 

Mr. Henry J. N. Taub 

Mr. and Mrs. James U. Teague 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Tellepsen 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Thorstenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Wash Bryan Tram- 

MELL 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack T. Trotter 

Mrs. p. E. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Underwood 



Mr. and Mrs. Milton R. Underwood 

Mrs. Joe Weingarten 

Mr. Damon Wells, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley W. West 

Mrs. Harry C. Wiess 

Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Wilford 

Mr. and Mrs. Willouchby C. 

Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace D. Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. James O. Winston, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin N. Woodson 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Worden 
Mr. and Mrs. Gus S. Wortham 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jackson Wray 



The Rice University Research 
Sponsors 

Cameron Iron Works, Inc. 

Continental Oil Company 

Douglas Aircraft Company 

Humble Oil & Refining Company 

International Business Machines Corporation 

International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation 

Shell Oil Company 

Tenneco Inc. 

Texaco Inc. 

Union Carbide Corporation 



The College Masters 



BAKER COLLEGE 

Charles William Philpott. B.A., M.S., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Biology 

BROWN COLLEGE 
John J. W. Rogers. B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Professor of Geology 

HANSZEN COLLEGE 
Ira Dempsey Gruber. A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of History 

JONES COLLEGE 
Trenton William Wann. A.B., Ph.D. Professor of Psychology 

LOVETT COLLEGE 
Robert Floyd Curl, Jr. B.A., Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry 

WIESS COLLEGE 

Roy VanNeste Talmage. A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Biology 

WILL RICE COLLEGE 

James Street Fulton. B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy 



The Instructional and 
Research Staff* 

Emeritus Faculty 

Battista, Joseph Lloyd. Associate Professor Emeritus of Romance 
Languages 

Certificat d'fitudes Fran^aises (Bordeaux) 1919; Dipl6me d'fitudes Sup^rieures 
(Bordeaux) 1919, B.A. (Michigan) 1920; M.A. (Washington University) 1923; 
M.A. Harvard) 1929 

Dean, Alice Crowell. Librarian Ejnerita 
B.A. (Rice) 1916; M.A. (Rice) 1919 

Freund, Friedrich Ernst Max. Professor Emeritus of German 
Ph.D. (Leipzig) 1902 

Hartsook, Arthur J. Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering 
A.B. (Nebraska Wesleyan) 1911; B.S. in Ch.E. (M.I.T.) 1920; M.S. (M.I.T.) 1921 

Moraud, Marcel. Professor Emeritus of French 

Agr^g^ de I'Universit^ (Paris) 1919; Docteur^s Lettres (Paris) 1933 

Neely, Jess Claiborne. Athletic Director Emeritus 
L.L.B. (Vanderbilt) 1924 

Nicholas, Henry Oscar. Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
A.B. (Oberlin) 1919; Ph.D. (Yale) 1923 

Ryon, Lewis Babcock. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering and 
Honorary Associate of Hanszen College 
C.E. (Lehigh) 1917 

Welsh, Hugh Clayton. Lecturer Emeritus in Biology and Medical 
A dviser 
M.D. (Texas) 1923 



Faculty 



Adams, John Allan Stewart. Professor of Geology 

Ph.B. (Chicago) 1946; B.S. (Chicago) 1948; M.S. (Chicago) 1949; Ph.D. (Chicago) 
1951 

Akers, William Walter. Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. in Ch.E. (Texas Tech.) 1943; M.S. in Ch.E. (Texas) 1944; Ph.D. (Michigan) 
1950 

♦The Faculty is listed as of July 1, 1968; other staff as of November, 1967. 

10 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 11 

Alfrey, Clarence P., Jr. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical 
Engineering 
B.A. (Rice) 1951; M.D. (Baylor) 1955 

Alhadeff, Albert. Visiting Lecturer in Fine Arts 

B.A. (Columbia) 1958; M.A. (New York) 1962; M.A. (Germany) 1965 

Ambler, John S. Associate Professor of Political Science and Faculty 
Associate of Broiun College 

B.A. (Willamette) 1953; A.M. (Stanford) 1954; Certificat d'ttudes Politiques 
(Bordeaux) 1955; Ph.D. (California) 1964 

Anderson, Hugh R. Assistant Professor of Space Science and Nonresi- 
dent Associate of Baker College 
B.A. (Iowa) 1954; M.A. (Iowa) 1858; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1961 

Ansevin, Krystyna D. Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S. (Jagellonian) 1950; M.S. (Jagelonian) 1950; Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 1961 

Austin, Walter James. Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S. in C.E. (Rice) 1941; M.S. in C.E (Illinois) 1946; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1949 

Austin, William Harvey. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Non- 
resident Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Wesleyan) 1957; B.D. (Yale) 1960; Ph.D. (Yale) 1966 

Awapara, Jorge. Professor of Biochemistry and Faculty Associate of 
Jones College 

B.S. (Michigan State) 1941; M.S. (Michigan State) 1942; Ph.D. (Southern Cali- 
fornia) 1947 

Badner, Milo D. Lecturer in Fine Arts 

B.A. (City College, New York) 1959; M.A. (Columbia) 1963 

Bahler, Alan Stuart. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S. (Newark) 1957; M.S. (Newark) 1959; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1966 

Baker, Donald Roy. Associate Professor of Geology and Nonresident 
Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1950; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1955 

Baker, Stephen D. Assistant Professor of Physics and Nonresident 
Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (Duke) 1957; M.S. (Yale) 1959; Ph.D. (Yale) 1963 

Baker, Stewart A. Assistant Professor of English and Resident Asso- 
ciate of Wiess College 
B.A. (Columbia) 1960; MA. (Yale) 1961; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Bang, Thomas. Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts 
B.F.A. (Yale) 1962; M.F.A. (U.S.C.) 1964 

Barac, Vladimir E. Lecturer in English 
M.A. (Texas) 1966 

Barker, J, R. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
and Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 
B.S. in P.E. (Rice) 1949; M.Ed. (Texas) 1954 

Barker, John Claude. Assistant Professor of History and Nonresident 
Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (Cambridge) 1958; M.A. (Cambridge) 1962; B.D. (Yale) 1963; M.A. (To- 
ronto) 1964; Ph.D. (Toronto) 1967 



12 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Barker, Rosalind A. Lecturer in English 

B.A. (Richmond) 1967; M.A. (Yale) 1959; Ph.D. (Yale) 1963 

Bauer, Friedrich Welhelm. Visiting Professor of Mathematics 
Diplom (Frankfurt) 1955; Ph.D. (Frankfurt) 1959 

Baum, Ernest Roy. Lecturer in Education 
B.A. (Trinity University) 1956; M.A. (Texas) 1961 

Bearden, Francis W. Professor of Health and Physical Education and 
Nonresident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.S. (Texas Tech.) 1947; M.A. (Columbia) 1949; Ed.D. (Columbia) 1954 

Beckmann, Herbert W. K. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Dipl. Ing. (Hanover) 1944; Dr. Ing. (Hanover) 1957 

Bedford, R. Wayne. Lecturer in Music 

B.S, (Houghton) 1938; M.A. (North Texas) 1955; Ph.D. (Midwestern) 1950 

Bell, David. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (City College of New York) 1960; Ph.D. (Brown) 1966 

Besen, Stanley M. Associate Professor of Economics and Nonresident 
Associate of Hanszen College 
B.B.A. (City College of N.Y.) 1958; M.A. (Yale) 1960; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Bland, Robert Lester, Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education and Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Central Washington) 1953; M.A. (Columbia) 1954 

BocHNER, Salomon. Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D. (U. of Berlin) 1921 

Bourgeois, Andre Marie Georges. Professor of French 

Bachelier ^s Lettres (Paris) 1921; Bachelier en Droit (Paris) 1923; Certifi^ 
d'fitudes Sup^rieures de Lettres (Paris) 1930; M.A. (Texas) 1934; Docteur de 
rUniversit^ (Paris) 1945; Officer de I'lnstruction Publique 1945 

Bourne, Henry Clark, Jr. Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Nonresident Associate of Baker College 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1947; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1948; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1952 

BowEN, Ray M. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Mathematical Science 

B.S. (Texas A&M) 1958; M.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1959; Ph.D. (Texas 
A&M) 1961 

Bray, Hubert Evelyn. Trustee Distinguished Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Faculty Associate Emeritus of Jones College 
B.A, (Tufts) 1910; M.A. (Harvard) 1916; Ph.D. (Rice) 1918 

Brooks, Philip R. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Nonresident 
Associate of Lovett College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1960; Ph.D. (California) 1964 

Brotzen, Franz Richard. Professor of Materials Science and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 
B.S. (Case Institute) 1950; M.S. (Case Institute) 1953; Ph.D. (Case Institute) 1954 

Brown, Katherine Tsanoff, Lecturer in Fine Arts and Nonresident 
Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Rice) 1938; M.F.A. (Cornell) 1940 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 13 

Bryan, Andrew Bonnell. Lecturer in Physics 
B.A. (Rice) 1918; M.A. (Rice) 1920; Ph.D. (Rice) 1922 

Burch, Robert W. Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A. (Rice) 19G5 

Burchfiel, Burrell Clark. Associate Professor of Geology 
B.S. (Stanford) 1957; M.S. (Stanford) 1958; Ph.D. (Yale) 1961 

BuRRus, C. Sidney. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Nonresident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Rice) 1958; B.S. in E.E. (Rice) 1958; M.S. (Rke) 1960; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1965 

BuscH, Arthur Winston. Professor of Environmental Engineering 
B.S. (Texas Tech.) 1950; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1952 

Buse, Dorothy. Lecturer in Education 
B.A. (Texas) 1951 

Camblin, Bob. Visiting Associate Professor of Fine Arts 

B.F.A. (Kansas City Art Institute) 1954; M.F.A. (Kansas City Art Institute) 1955 

Camden, Carroll. Professor of English and Nonresident Associate of 
Hanszen College 
A.B. (Centre) 1925; MA. (Iowa) 1928; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1930 

Campbell, James Wayne. Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S. (Southwest Missouri) 1953; M.S. (Illinois) 1955; Ph.D. (Oklahoma) 1958 

Cantrell, Thomas 5. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Resident 
Associate of Baker College 

B.S. (South Carolina) 1958; M.S. (South Carolina) 1959; PhD. (Ohio State) 
1964 

Carrington, Samuel M. Assistant Professor of French 

A.B. (North Carolina) 1960; M.A. (North Carolina) 1962; Ph.D, (North Car- 
olina) 1965 

Cason, Carolyn. Director of Food Service and Lecturer in Dietetics 
B.S. (Texas) 1934; M.A. (Columbia) 1939 

Castaneda, James A. Professor of Spanish and Nonresident Associate 
of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Drew) 1954; M.A. (Yale) 1955; Ph.D. (Yale) 1958 

Caudill, William W. William Ward Watkin Professor of Architec- 
ture and Director of the School of Architecture 

B.ARCH. (Oklahoma State) 1937; MArch. (M.I.T.) 1939; LL.D. (Eastern Michi- 
gan) 1957 

Chapman, Alan Jesse. Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engi- 
neering 
B.S. in M.E. (Rice) 1945; M.S. (Colorado) 1949; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1953 

Charles, Robert E. Instructor of Classics 
B.A. (Chicago) 1955 

Charlton, Norman W. Lecturer in Health and Physical Education 
B.S. (Rice) 1961 



14 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Cheatham, John Bane. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Nonresident Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. (Southern Methodist) 1948; M.S. (Southern Methodist) 1953; Ph.D. (Rice) 
1960 

Chern, Li-Ching. G. C. Evans Instructor in Mathematics 
B.Sc. (Taiwan) 1962; M.A. (Rochester) 1965; Ph.D. (Rochester) 1967 

Chillman, James Henry, Jr. Trustee Distinguished Professor of Fine 
Arts and Faculty Associate Emeritus of Jones College 
B.S. in Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1913; M.S. in Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1914; F.AA.R. 
(Am. Acad, in Rome) 1922; Fellow A.I.A. 1950 

Christianson, Heinz C. Instructor in Germanics 
B.A. (Weber State College) 1965; M.A. (Rice) 1967 

Clark, Howard Charles. Assistant Professor of Geology and Nonresi- 
dent Associate of Lovett College 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1959; M.S. (Stanford) 1965; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1966 

Class, Calvin Miller. Professor of Physics 

A.B. Qohns Hopkins) 1943; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1951 

Clayton, Donald Delbert. Associate Professor of Space Science and 
Faculty Associate of Brown College 

B.S. (Southern Methodist) 1956; M.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1959; Ph.D. 
(California Inst, of Tech.) 1962 

Cloutier, Paul A. Assistant Professor of Space Science 
B.S. (Southwestern Louisiana) 1964; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Connell, Edwin H, Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. (McMurry) 1952; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1958 

Cooper, Joseph. Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.A. (Harvard) 1955; MA. (Harvard) 1959; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1961 

Copeland, James E. Assistant Professor of German and Nonresident 
Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (Colorado) 1961; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1965 

Cox, Robert S. Assistant Professor of English and Faculty Associate 
of Jones College 
B.A. (Arizona State) 1959; Ph.D. (Indiana) 1965 

Craig, Hardin, Jr. Professor of History and Nonresident Associate of 
Will Rice College 
A.B. (Princeton) 1929; A.M. (Harvard) 1931; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1937 

Croneis, Carey. Harry Carothers Wiess Professor of Geology and 
Chancellor 

B.S. (Denison) 1922; M.S. (Kansas) 1923; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1928; LL.D. (Lawrence) 
1944; D.Sc. (Denison) 1945; D.Sc. (Ripon) 1945; D.Eng. (Colorado Mines) 1949; 
LL.D. (Beloit) 1954; L.H.D. (Tampa) 1964; D.Sc. (Texas Christian) 1965; D.Sc. 
(Texas Tech.) 1967; D.Sc (Beloit) 1968 

Cruikshank, Robert J. Lecturer in Accounting 
B.A. (Rice) 1951 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 15 

Curl, Robert Floyd, Jr. Professor of Chemistry and Master of Lovett 
College 
B.A. (Rice) 1954; Ph.D. (California) 1957 

Curtis, Jerry Lynn. Assistant Professor of French 

B.A. (U. of Utah) 1964; Diplome d' Etudes (U. of Paris) 1965; M.A. (U. of 
Washington) 1966 

Curtis, Morton Landers. W. L. Moody, Jr., Professor of Mathematics 
and Nonresident Associate of Lovett College 
B.S. (Texas A. & I.) 1943; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1951 

Cuthbertson, Gilbert Morris. Assistant Professor of Political Science 
and Resident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Kansas) 1959; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1963 

Cyprus, Joel Howard. Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 
B.A. (Rice) 1959; M.S. (Rice) 1961; Ph.D. (Rice) 1963 

Davidson, Franklin Chandler. Lecturer in Psychology and Sociology 
B.A. (Texas) 1961; M.A. (Princeton) 1966 

Davis, Karen. Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Admin- 
istration 
B.A. (Rice) 1965 

Davis, Lionel E. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.Sc. (Nottingham) 1956; Ph.D. (London) 1960 

Davis, Sam H., Jr. Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Mathematical Science 
B.A. (Rice) 1952; B.S. in Ch.E. (Rice) 1953; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1957 

Deans, Harry Alexander. Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (Rice) 1953; B.S. in Ch.E. (Rice) 1954; M^S. in Ch.E. (Rice) 1956; Ph.D. 
(Princeton) 1960 

De Bremaecker, Jean-Claude. Professor of Geology and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 

Ing^nieur Civil des Mines (Louvain) 1948; M.S. (Louisiana State) 1950; Ph.D. 
(California) 1952 

De Figueiredo, Rui J. P. Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Mathematical Science 
S.B. (M.LT.) 1950; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1952; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1959 

Dessler, Alexander J. Professor of Space Science 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1952; Ph.D. (Duke) 1956 

Dix, Robert H. Associate Professor of Political Science 
B.A. (Harvard) 1951; M.A. (Harvard) 1953; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1962 

DoNOHo, Paul Leighton. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (Rice) 1952; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1958 

Doughtie, Edward Orth. Assistant Professor of English and Non- 
resident Associate of Lovett College 
A.B. (Duke) 1958; A.M. (Harvard) 1960; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1964 



16 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

DowDEN, Wilfred Sellers. Professor of English and Nonresident 
Associate of Baker College 
B.A. (Vanderbilt) 1939; MJi. (Vanderbilt) 1940; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1949 

Drew, Katherine Fischer. Professor of History and Faculty Associate 
of Jones College 
B.A. (Rice) 1944; M.A. (Rice) 1945; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1950 

DuCharme, Wesley M. Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (U. of Colorado) 1964; Ph.D. (U. of Michigan) 1968 

Duck, Ian. Associate Professor of Physics and Nonresident Associate 
of Hanszen College 
B.S. (Queen's, Ontario) 1955; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1961 

Duke, Reese D. Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S. (Ouachita) 1950; M.Ed. (Texas) 1954; Ph.D. (Texas) 1966 

Dyess, Arthur D., Jr. Lecturer in Architecture 
A.B. (Yale) 1939; LL.B. (Texas) 1942 

Dyson, Derek C. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.A. (Cambridge) 1955; Ph.D. (London) 1966 

Edwards, Edgar Owen. Reginald Henry Hargrove Professor of Eco- 
nomics 

A.B. (Washington and Jefferson) 1947; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1949; Ph.D. (Johns 
Hopkins) 1951 

EiSENBERG, Robert M. Assistant Professor of Biology and Nonresident 
Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (Chattanooga) 1961; M.S. (Michigan) 1963; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1965 

Elbein, Alan D. Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B. (Clark) 1954; M.S. (Arizona) 1956; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1960 

Estle, Thomas L. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (Rice) 1953; M.S. (Illinois) 1954; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1957 

Evans, Elinor Lucile. Professor of Architecture 
B.A. (Oklahoma State) 1938; M.F.A. (Yale) 1954 

Farb, Aubrey Meyer. Lecturer in Accounting 
B.A. (Rice) 1942; M.S. (Columbia) 1946 

Feustel, Edward A. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.S. (M.I.T.) 1964; M.S. (Cambridge) 1964; M.A. (Princeton) 1966; Ph.D. Prince- 
ton) 1967 

Fisher, Frank M., Jr. Associate Professor of Biology and Nonresident 
Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Hanover) 1953; M.S. (Purdue) 1958; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1961 

Fisher, Gary D. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S. (Texas) 1957; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1965 

Franklin, Joseph L. Robert A. Welch Professor of Chemistry and 
Nonresident Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (Texas) 1929; M.S. (Texas) 1930; Ph.D. (Texas) 1934 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 17 

Freeman, John W. Associate Professor of Space Science 
B.S. (Beloit) 1957: M.S. (Iowa) 1961; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1963 

Freeman, Michael B. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (California) 1958; M.S. (California) 1960; Ph.D. (California) 1965 

Fulton, James Street. Professor of Philosophy and Master of Will 
Rice College 
B.A. (Vanderbilt) 1925; M.A. (Vanderbilt) 1929; Ph.D. (CorneU) 1934 

Galambos, Louis Paul. Associate Professor of History 
Bj\. (Indiana) 1955; M.A. (Yale) 1957; Ph.D. (Yale) 1960 

Gamst, Frederick Charles. Assistant Professor of Anthropology and 
Nonresident Associate of Lovett College 
A.B. (U.C.L.A.) 1961; Ph.D. (California) 1967 

Gardner, Frederick C. Instructor in Architecture 

B.Arch. (Rice) 1966; B.A. (Rice) 1966; Mj^rch. (Rice) 1967 

Gansow, Otto A. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
A.B. (Washington U.) 1962; Ph.D. (Northwestern) 1966 

Garside, Charles. Associate Professor of History and Nonresident 
Associate of Baker College 
A.B. (Princeton) 1950; M.A. (Columbia) 1951; Ph.D. (Yale) 1957 

Gerhardt, James M. Assistant Professor of Political Science and Non- 
resident Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (West Point) 1952; M.A. (Harvard) 1956 

Gersten, Stephen M. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
A.B. (Princeton) 1961; Ph.D. (Cambridge) 1965 

Giannoni, Carlo B. Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (Chicago) 1961; M.A. (Pittsburgh) 1963; Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 1966 

Giles, James Bernard. Lecturer in Economics, Director of Admis- 
sions, and Nonresident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.B.A. (Texas) 1936; M.A. (Texas) 1937 

Glass, Graham P. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Nonresident 
Associate of Lovett College 
Ph.D. (Cambridge) 1963 

Goldman, Martin E. Griffith C. Evans Instructor in Mathematics 
B.A. (Harpur College. State U. of New York) 1963; M.A. (Yale) 1965; Ph.D. 
(Yale) 1967 

GoLDWiRE, Henry C, Jr. Assistant Professor of Space Science 
B.A. (Rice) 1963; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Goodman, Mary Ellen. Professor of Anthropology and Sociology and 
Faculty Associate of Brown College 
B.Ed. (U.C.LA.) 1932; M.A. (Radcliffe) 1943; Ph.D. (Radcliffe) 1946 

Goodwin, Kathleen. Assistant Professor of Germanics 
B.A. (Texas) 1963; M.A. (Harvard) 1965 



18 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Gordon, William E. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Space 
Science, Dean of Engineering and Science and Nonresident Asso- 
ciate of Baker College 
B.S. (Montclair) 1939; M.S. (Montclair) 1942; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1953 

Green, Joan R. Instructor in Spanish 

B.A. (N.Y.U.) 1954; M.A. (U. of Houston) 1964 

Griffiths, Beryl. Lecturer in Health and Physical Education 
Teacher's Certificate (Dartford College, England) 1954 

Grob, Alan. Associate Professor of English and Nonresident Associate 
of Hanszen College 

B.A. (Utica College of Syracuse University) 1952; M.A. (Wisconsin) 1957; Ph.D. 
(Wisconsin) 1961 

Gruber, Ira Dempsey. Associate Professor of History and Master of 
Hanszen College 
A.B. (Duke) 1955; M.A. (Duke) 1959; Ph.D. (Duke) 1961 

Hagen, Harold B. Head Football Coach, Director of Athletics and 
Nonresident Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (South Carolina) 1950 

Hale, Elton Bernard. Associate Professor of Comjnerce 

B.S. (Southwest Texas) 1937; M.A. (Southwest Texas) 1941; Ph.D. (Texas) 1948 

Hall, Arthur E. Associate Professor of Music 
Mus. Bac. (Yale) 1924; M.M. (Baylor) 1949 

Harvey, F. Reese. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1963; M.A. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech) 1963; Ph.D. 
(Oxford) 1966 

Harwood, Edwin S. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (Stanford) 1962; M.A. (Chicago) 1964; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1966 

Haug, Patricia A. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geology 
B.S. (Columbia) 1961; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1967 

Havens, Neil. Lecturer in Drama and Faculty Associate of Jones 
College 
B.A. (Rice) 1956; M.A. (Indiana) 1959 

Hayes, Edward F. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (Rochester) 1963; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1965; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1966 

Haymes, Robert C. Associate Professor of Space Science 
B.A. (N.Y.U.) 1952; M.S. (N.Y.U. 1953; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1959 

Hellums, Jesse David. Professor of Chemical Engineering 
and No7iresident Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. in Ch.E. (Texas) 1950; M.S. in Ch.E. (Texas) 1958; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1961 

Hembree, Earle Marlin. Instructor in Sociology 
B.A. (Rice) 1965 

Hempel, John. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (Utah) 1957; M.S. (Wisconsin) 1959; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1962 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 19 

Hermance, Gilbert Leslie. Professor of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion and Nonresident Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (Oregon) 1927; M.A. (Columbia) 1930 

Heymann, Dieter. Associate Professor of Geology and Space Science 
and Nonresident Associate of Baker College 
Ph.D. (Amsterdam) 1958 

Hk;ginbotham, Sanford Wilson. Professor of History 

B.A. (Rice) 1934; M.A. (Louisiana State) 1941; Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1949 

Hightower, Joe W. Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (Harding College) 1959; M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 1961; Ph.D. (Johns Hop- 
kins) 1963 

Hinckley, Katherine A. Instructor in Political Science 
B.A. (Missouri) 1958; M.A. (Stanford) 1963 

Hodges, Lee. Associate Professor of French 
B.S. (Harvard) 1930; M.A. (Rice) 1934 

Hole, Frank. Professor of Anthropolgy and Nonresident Associate 
of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Cornell College) 1953; M.A. (Chicago) 1958; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1961 

Holien, Gerald Arthur. Instructor in Philosophy 
B.A. (U. of South Dakota) 1965 

Holt, Edward Chester, Jr. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
S.B. (M.I.T.) 1945; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1947; Ph.D. (Penn State) 1956 

Horn, Friedrich. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Mathemati- 
cal Science 

Diplom Ingenieur (Technische Hochschule, Wien) 1954; Dr.techn. (Technische 
Hochschule. Wien) 1958 

Houston, William Vermillion. Distinguished Professor of Physics, 
Honorary Chancellor, and Honorary Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (Ohio State) 1920; B.S. in Ed. (Ohio State) 1920; S.M. (Chicago) 1922; Ph.D. 
(Ohio State) 1925; D.Sc. (Ohio State) 1950; LL.D. (California) 1956 

Howell, William C. Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (Virginia) 1954; M.A. (Virginia) 1956; Ph.D. (Virginia) 1958 

Huang, Ho-Yi. Assistant Professor of Astronautics, Materials 
Science and Mechanical Aerospace Engineering 
B.S. (Formosa) 1961; M.S. (Rice) 1966; Ph.D. (Rice) 1968 

Huband, Frank Louis. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
and Mathematical Science and Nonresident Associate of Weiss 
College 
B.E. (Cornell) 1961; M.S. (Cornell) 1963; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1966 

Huddle, Donald L. Associate Professor of Economics and Faculty 
Associate of Brown College 
B.S. (U.C.L.A.) 1959; M.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1960; Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 1964 

Hudson, Bradford Benedict. Professor of Psychology and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 
A.B. (Stanford) 1930; Ph.D. (California) 1947 



20 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Hudspeth, Chalmers Mac. Lecturer in Government and Nonresident 
Associate of Wiess College 
B.A. (Rice) 1940; LL.B. (Texas) 1946 

Hyman, Harold M. Professor of History 

B.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1948; M.A. (Columbia) 1950; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1952 

Iliffe, John K. Visiting Professor of Computer Science 
B.A. (Cambridge) 1953; M.A. (Cambridge) 1957 

Ingham, John D. Instructor in Anthropology 
B.A. (California) 1962 

Ingram, John D. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Mathematical Science 
B. Chem. (Tulsa) 1959; M.S. (Tulsa) 1961; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1965 

Isle, Walter Whitefield. Associate Professor of English and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 
A.B. (Harvard) 1955; M.A. (Michigan) 1957; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1961 

Jack, Ian. Visiting Professor of English and Nonresident Associate of 
Baker College 
B.A. (Edinburgh) 1942; M.A. (Edinburgh) 1947; Ph.D. (Oxford) 1950 

Jackson, Roy. Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.A. (Cambridge) 1955; M.A. (Cambridge) 1958; D.Sc. (Edinburgh) 1968 

Jacobs, Marc Q. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1962; Ph.D. (Oklahoma) 1966 

JiRSA, James O. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S. (Nebraska) I960; M.S. (Illinois) 1962; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1963 

JiTKOFF, Andrew N. Associate Professor of Russian and Nonresident 
Associate of Baker College 
Bachelor (Prague Inst, of Tech.) 1928; Master (Prague Inst, of Tech.) 1931 

Johnson, Michael L. Lecturer in English 

B.A. (Rice) 1965; M.A. (Stanford) 1966; Ph.D. (Rice) 1968 

Jones, B. Frank. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Nonresident 
Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Rice) 1958; Ph.D. (Rice) 1961 

Jones, Roy G. Assistant Professor of Russian 

B.A. (East Texas State) 1954; MA. (East Texas State) 1954; Ph.D. (Texas) 196!> 

Jordan, James A., Jr. Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S. (Ohio State) 1958; M.S. (Michigan) 1959; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1964 

Jump, J. Robert. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S. (Cincinnati) 1960; M.S. (Cincinnati) 1962; M.S. (Michigan) 1965 

Justice, Blair. Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A. (Texas) 1948; M.S. (Columbia) 1949; M.A. (Texas Christian) 1963; Ph.D. 
(Rice) 1966 

Kahn, Robert Ludwig. Professor of German and Nonresident Associ- 
ate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Dalhousie) 1944; M.A. (Dalhousie) 1945; Ph.D. (Toronto) 1950 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 21 

Kaplan, Howard B. Visiting Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A. (N.Y.U.) 1953; M.A. (N.Y.U.) 1954; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1958 

Karakashian, Stephen. Associate Professor of Biology and Nonresi- 
dent Associate of Baker College 
B.A. (Drew) 1957; M.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1958; Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1961 

Kelly, Thomas D. Assistant Professor of English 
A.B. (California) 1963; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1967 

Kennon, Paul A., Jr. Lecturer in Architecture 

B.Arch. (Texas A & M) 1956; M.Arch. (Cranbrook) 1957 

KiLPATRiCK, John Edgar. Professor of Chemistry 

BA. (Stephen F. Austin) 1940; A.M. (Kansas) 1942; Ph.D. (California) 1945 

Klein, R. M. Instructor in Germanics 
B.S. (Wisconsin) 1962 

Kobayashi, Riki. Louis Calder Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.S. in Ch.E. (Rice) 1944; M.S.E. in Ch.E. (Michigan) 1947; Ph.D. (Michigan) 
1951 

Koecher, Max. Visiting Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D. (Gottingen) 1951 

KoEPKE, WuLF. Associate Professor of Germanics 
B.A. (Freiburg) 1952; Ph.D. (Freiburg) 1955 

Kolenda, Konstantin. Professor of Philosophy and Nonresident Asso- 
ciate of Will Rice College 
BA. (Rice) 1950; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1953 

Krahl, Nat Wetzel. Professor of Structural Engineering and Faculty 
Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (Rice) 1942; B.S. in C.E. (Rice) 1943; M.S. (Illinois) 1950; Ph.D. (Illinois) 
1963 

Krzyzaniak, Marian. Professor of Ecojiomics 

M.Econ. & Pol. &d. (Poznan) 1932; M.A. (Alberta) 1954; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1959 

KusuDA, Tetsuzo. Visiting Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.E. (University of Osaka, Japan) 1950; Dr. E. (University of Osaka. Japan) 
1962 

Land, James. Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A. (S.M.U.) 1957; M.A. (S.M.U.) 1958; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1963 

Landre, Louis, Visiting Professor of French 

Agr<^gation d* Anglais (Ecole Normale Sup^rreure) 1922 Docteur ^s Lettres 
University de Paris) 1936 

Lane, Neal F. Assistant Professor of Physics and Faculty Associate of 
Brown College 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1960; M.S. (Oklahoma) 1962; Ph.D. (Oklahoma) 1964 

Lankford, Robert Renninger. Associate Professor of Geology and 
Faculty Associate of Broiun College 
A.B. (Colgate) 1950; M.S. (Utah) 1962; Ph.D. (California, Scripps Inst.) 1962 



22 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Leal de Martinez, Maria Teresa. Associate Professor of Portuguese 
and Spanish 

B.A. (Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Rio de Janeiro) 1946; Licenciatura in 
Romance Languages (Rio de Janeiro) 1946; Ph.D. (Brasil) 1963 

Lear, Floyd Seyward. Trustee Distinguished Professor of History 
A.B. (Rochester) 1917; A.M. (Harvard) 1920; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1925 

Lecuyer, Maurice Antoine. Associate Professor of French 

Licence b.& Lettres (Paris) 1943; DipI6me d'£tudes Sup^rieures (Paris) 1944; Ph.D. 
(Yale) 1954 

Leeds, J. Venn, Jr. Associate Professor of Electrical and Environmental 
Engineering and Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. ^Rice) 1955; B.S. in E.E. (Rice) 1956; M.S. in E.E. (Pittsburgh) 1960; Ph.D. 
(Pittsburgh) 1963 

Lees, J. A. Griffith C. Evaris Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S. (City College of New York) 1962; M.S. (Chicago) 1963; Ph.D. (Chicago) 
1967 

Leifeste, Alonzo August, Jr. Assistant Professor of Architecture 
A.B. (Southwestern) 1934; B.S. in Arch. (Rice) 1941 

Leland, Thomas W., Jr. Professor of Chemical Engineering and 
Faculty Associate of Jones College 
B.S. (Texas A.&M.) 1947; M.S.E. (Michigan) 1949; Ph.D. (Texas) 1954 

Lendinez, Esteban. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A.B. (Kalamazoo) 1959; M.A. (Illinois) 1961; Ph.D. (Madrid) 1965 

Leonard, Peter C. Instructor in Mathematics 
A.B. (Middleburg College) 1962; Ph.D. (Brown) 1968 

Levin, Donald Norman. Professor of Classics and Nonresidence As- 
sociate of Will Rice College 

A.B. (Cornell) 1949; A.M. (Cornell) 1952; A.M. (Harvard) 1954; Ph.D. (Harvard) 
1957 

Levy, Ferdinand K. Professor of Economics and Nonresident Asso- 
ciate of Baker College 

B.S. (Tulane) 1950; M.B.A. (Tulane) 1952; M.S. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1962; 
Ph.D. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1964 

Lewis, Edward Sheldon. Professor of Chemistry and Nonresident As- 
sociate of Wiess College 
B.S. (California) 1940; M.A. (Harvard) 1947; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1947 

Loewenheim, Francis Lippmann. Associate Professor of History 
A.B. (Cincinnati) 1947; A.M. (Cincinnati) 1948; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1952 

Low, Frank J. Professor of Space Science 

B.S. (Yale) 1955; M.A. (Rice) 1957; Ph.D. (Rice) 1959 

Lutes, Loren D. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.Sc. (Nebraska) 1960; M.Sc. (Nebraska) 1961; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 
1967 

Mabe, Robert Doss. Assistant Professor of Architecture 
B.A. (Rice) 1967; M.Arch. (Harvard) 1968 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 23 

Mackay, Donald B. Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineer- 
ing 
B.S. (Utah) 1939; M.S. (Michigan) 1942; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1951 

MacKellar, Alan D. Lecturer in Physics 

B.S.E. (Michigan) 1958; M.S, (Michigan) 1960; Ph.D. (Texas A&M) 1965 

MacPhail, Malcolm R. Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 
B.A. (Toronto) 1935; M.A. (Princeton) 1939; Ph.D, (Princeton) 1939 

Magid, Ronald. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Nonresident As- 
sociate of Hanszen College 
B.S. (Yale) 1959; M.S. (Yale) 1960; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Malsch, Wilfried. Visiting Professor of German 
Ph.D. (Freiburg, i.B., Germany) 1957 

Manser, Anthony R. Visiting Professor of Philosophy 
B.Phil (Oxford) 1950 

Margrave, John Lee. Professor of Chemistry and Faculty Associate 
of Brown College 
B.S. (Kansas) 1948; Ph.D. (Kansas) 1951 

Martin, William C. Assistant Professor of Sociology 
A.M. (Abilene Christian) 1960; S.T.B. (Harvard Divinity) 1963 

Matusow, Allen Joseph. Associate Professor of History and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 
BA. (Ursinus) 1958; M.A. harvard) 1959; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1963 

McDonald, A. P. Associate Professor of Engineering Graphics 
B.S. (Texas A&M) 1930; M.S. (Texas A&M) 1943 

McEnany, Michael Vincent. Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
Dean of Undergraduate Affairs, and Honorary Nonresident Associ- 
ate of Will Rice College 
B.S. in E.E. (Colorado College) 1929; M.A. (Dartmouth) 1931 

McGiNNis, Rodney W. Assistant Professor of Psychology and Non- 
resident Associate of Lovett College 
A.B. (Boston) 1962; Ph.D. (Texas) 1967 

McKiLLOP, Alan Dugald. Professor of English and Faculty Associate 
Emeritus of Jones College 
A.B. (Harvard) 1913; A.M. (Harvard) 1914; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1920 

McLellan, Rex B. Assistant Professor of Materials Science 
B.Met, (Sheffield) 1957; Ph.D. (Leeds) 1962 

McLure, Charles E. Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A. (Kansas) 1962; M.A. (Princeton) 1964 

McMurtry, Larry Jeff. Lecturer in English and Faculty Associate 
of Brown College 
B,A. (North Texas) 1958; M.A. (Rice) 1960 

Meixner, John. Professor of English 

B.A. (City College, N.Y.) 1951; M.A. (Brown) 1953; Ph.D. (Brown) 1957 



24 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Merwin, John Elwood. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and 
Nonresident Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (Rice) 1952; B^. in M.E. (Rice) 1953; M^. in M.E. (Rice) 1955; PhJ). 
(Cambridge) 1962 

Michel, Frank Curtis. Associate Professor of Space Science 

B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1955; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1962 

MiELE, Angelo. Professor of Astronautics 
Dr.C.E. (Rome) 1944; Dr.A.E. (Rome) 1946 

MiLBURN, Douglas Lafayette, Jr. Assistant Professor of German and 
Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Rice) 1958; M.A. (Rice) 1961; Ph.D. (Rice) 1964 

Miller, Terrell W. Instructor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engi- 
neering and Materials Science 
B.A. (Rice) 1966 

Minter, David. Assistant Professor of English and Nonresident As- 
sociate of Wiess College 

B.A. (North Texas State) 1957; M.A. (North Texas State) 1958; B.D. (Yale) 
1961; Ph.D. (Yale) 1965 

Mitchell, O. Jack. Associate Professor of Architecture and Faculty 
Associate of Brown College 

B.Arch. (Washington) 1954; M.Arch. (Pennsylvania) 1961; M.C.P. (Pennsylvania) 
1961 

Moore, Helen Lanneau. Lecturer in Classics 

Bj\., (North Carolina) 1944; Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1955 

MoREHEAD, James Caddall, Jr. Professor of Architecture, Registrar, 
and Nonresident Associate of Baker College 
A.B. (Princeton) 1935; B.Arch. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1939 

Morgan, John Willard. Griffith C. Evans Instructor in Mathtmatics 
B.A. (Rice) 1968 

Morris, Wesley Abram. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. (Kentucky) 1961; M.A. (Kentucky) 1963; Ph.D. (Iowa) 1968 

MuiR, Andrew Forest. Professor of History 

B.A. (Rice) 1938; UA. (Rice) 1942; PhJD. (Texas) 1949 

MuRDOCK, William. Turner Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies 
A.B. (Shorter College) 1958; Ph.D. (Claremont) 1968 

Neu, Charles Eric. Associate Professor of History and Faculty Associ- 
ate of Jones College 
B.A. (Northwestern) 1958; A.M. (Harvard) 1960; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1964 

Newton, Ch artier. Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.Arch. (Texas A&M) 1956; M.Arch (Cranbrook Academy of Art) 1957 

Nielsen, Niels Christian, Jr. /. Newton Rayzor Professor of Philoso- 
phy and Religious Thought and Nonresident Associate of Baker 
College 
B.A. (Pepperdine) 1942; B.D. (Yale) 1946; Ph.D. (Yale) 1951 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 25 

NissEN, David Harlan. Assistant Professor of Economics and Non- 
resident Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1960; M.A. (California) 1966; Ph.D. (California) 
1968 

NoRBECK, Edward. Professor of Anthropolgy and Nonresident Associate 
of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Michigan) 1948; M.A. (Michigan) 1949; Ph.D. (Michigan) 1952 

O'Brien, Brian J. Professor of Space Science and Nonresident Asso- 
ciate of Will Rice College 
B.Sc. (Sydney) 1954; Ph.D. (Sydney) 1957 

O'Keeffe, Richard L. Librarian 

Ph.B. (Mount Carmel) 1949; M.S. in L.S. (Louisiana State) 1956 

O'Neil, John, Professor of Fine Arts 

B.F.A. (Oklahoma) 1936; M.F.A. (Oklahoma) 1939 

O'Neil, Richard. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Nonresident 
Associate of Wiess College 
A.B. (Oberlin) 1952; M.S. (Chicago) 1955; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1960 

Orvedahl, Walter. Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 
B.S. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology) 1939 

Palka, John Milan. Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A. (Swarthmore) 1960; Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1965 

Papademetriou, Peter C. Assistant Professor of Architecture 
B.A. (Princeton) 1965; M.Arch (Yale) 1968 

Parish, John Edward. Professor of English and Resident Associate of 
Weiss College 
B.A. (Sam Houston) 1934; M.A. (Texas) 1939; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1952 

Parks, Thomas W. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Nonresident Associate of Lovett College 
B.E.E. (Cornell) 1961; M.S. (Cornell) 1964; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1967 

Parsons, David G. Associate Professor of Fine Arts and Nonresident 
Associate of Will Rice College 
B.S. (Wisconsin) 1934; M.S. (Wisconsin) 1937 

Pearson, James B., Jr. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S.E.E. (Arkansas) 1958; M.S.E.E. (Arkansas) 1959; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1962 

Pfeifer, Paul Edwin. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathe- 
matical Science and Dean of Students 

B.S. in E.E. (Rice) 1938; B.D. (Southern Methodist) 1943; M.S. in E.E. (Rice) 
1948; Ph.D. (Rice) 1952 

Phillips, Gerald Cleveland. Professor of Physics 
BA. (Rice) 1944; M.A. (Rice) 1947; Ph.D. (Rice) 1949 

Philpott, Charles William. Associate Professor of Biology and 
Master of Baker College 
B.A. (Texas Tech.) 1957; M.S. (Texas Tech.) 1958; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1962 



26 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

PiTZER, Kenneth Sanborn. Professor of Chemistry and President 

B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1935; Ph.D. (California) 1937; D.Sc. (Wesleyan) 
1962; LL.D. (California) 1963 

Poindexter, Hally Beth. Professor of Health and Physical Education 
and Associate Dean of Students 

B.A. (Rice) 1947; B.S. (Houston) 1949; M.A. (Colorado State) 1950; Ed.D. 
(Columbia) 1957 

Polking, John C. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (Notre Dame) 1956; M.S. (Chicago) 1961; Ph.D. (Chicago) 1966 

Price-Williams, Douglass. Professor of Psychology and Nonresident 
Associate of Baker College 
B.A. (London) 1954; Ph.D. (London) 1963 

Pulley, Thomas Edward. Lecturer in Biology 

B.A. (Rice) 1937; M.A. (Houston) 1946; M.S. (Houston) 1950; Ph.D. (Harvard) 
1952 

Puppe, Heinz W. Assistant Professor of German and Nonresident As- 
sociate of Lovett College 
B.A. (U.C.L.A.) 1956; Ph.D. (Innsbruck) 1959 

Raaphorst, Madeleine Marie Rousseau. Associate Professor of French 
Baccalaur^at ^s Lettres (Poitiers) 1939; Licence en Droit (Paris) 1943; Ph.D. 
(Rice) 1959 

Rabson, Thomas Avelyn. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
BA. (Rice) 1954; B.S. in E.E. (Rice) 1955; M.A. (Rice) 1957; Ph.D. (Rice) 1959 

Rachford, Henry H. Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 
B.S. (Rice) 1945; M.A. (Rice) 1947; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1950 

Ramirez, Manuel. Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (Texas) 1960; Ph.D. (Texas) 1963 

Ransom, Harry Steelesmith, Jr. Professor of Architecture and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 
B.Arch. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1947; M.Arch. (Texas A&M) 1967 

Rath, R. John. Professor of History 

A.B. (Kansas) 1932; M.A. (California) 1934; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1941 

Read, Clark Phares. Professor of Biology and Nonresident Associate 
of Hanszen College 
B.A. (Rice) 1948; M.A. (Rice) 1948; Ph.D. (Rice) 1950 

Rector, David Lee. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. (Southern Illinois) 1962; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1966 

Resnikoff, Howard L. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Non- 
resident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.S. (M.I.T.) 1957; Ph.D. (California) 1963 

Richardson, Ray Jean. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education 
B.S. (Texas Women's University) 1956; M.A. (Texas Women's University) 1959 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 27 

RiCHTER, George Holmes. Professor of Chemistry and Dean of Grad- 
uate Studies 
B.A. (Rice) 1926; M.A. (Rice) 1927; Ph.D. (Rice) 1929 

Rimlinger, Gaston Victor. Henry Fox, Sr., Professor of Economics 
and Faculty Associate of Jones College 
B.A. (Washington) 1951; Ph.D. (California) 1956 

RissER, J. R. Professor of Physics 

A.B. (Franklin and Marshall) 1931; M.A. (Princeton) 1935; Ph.D. (Princeton) 
1938 

Roberts, John Melville. Associate Professor of Materials Science and 
Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 
B.A.Sc. (Toronto) 1953; M.A.Sc. (Toronto) 1954; Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1960 

Rogers, John J. W. Professor of Geology and Master of Brown College 
B.S. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1952; M.S. (Minnesota) 1952; Ph.D. (California 
Inst, of Tech.) 1955 

Rorschach, Harold Emil, Jr. Professor of Physics 

S.B. (M.I.T.) 1949; S.M. (M.I.T.) 1950; Ph.D. (M.I.T.) 1952 

RuDEE, Mervyn L. Associate Professor of Materials Science and Fa- 
culty Associate of Jones College 
B.S. (Stanford) 1958; M.S. (Stanford) 1962; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1964 

Salsburg, Zevi Walter. Professor of Chemistry and Nonresident As- 
sociate of Will Rice College 
B.S. (Rochester) 1950; Ph.D. (Yale) 1953 

Sass, Ronald L. Professor of Chemistry 

A.B. (Augustana) 1954; Ph.D. (Southern California) 1957 

Schmaedeke, Wayne. Associate Professor of Mathematical Science 
B.S. (Minnesota) 1957; Ph.D. (Minnesota) 1963 

Schoeck, Gunther. Visiting Professor of Materials Science 
Dr. rer. nat. (Technische Hochschule) 1954 

Schorre, Charles. Assistant Professor of Fine Arts and Architecture 
B.F.A. (Texas) 1948 

Schubert, Manfred E. Assistant Professor of German and Faculty As- 
sociate of Broion College 
B.A. (Kalamazoo) 1960; A.M. (Stanford) 1963; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1965 

ScHUM, David A. Associate Professor of Psychology and Nonresident 
Associate of JViess College 
BA. (S.M.U.) 1956; M.A. (S.M.U.) 1961; Ph.D. (Ohio State) 1964 

Seagrave, Charles E. Assistant Professor of Economics and Nonresi- 
dent Associate of Lovett College 
A.B. (Brown) 1963; M.A. (Stanford) 1966 

Sheldon, Mary Elizabeth. Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthro- 
pology and Sociology 

A.B. (U. of Missouri) 1958; M.A. (U. of Missouri) 1960; Ph.D. (U. of Washing- 
ton) 1967 



28 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Shelton, Fred Vernon. Associate Professor of French and Nonresi- 
dent Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (Rice) 1926; M.A. (Rice) 1928; M.A. (Mexico) 1942; Docteur de I'Universit^ 
(Paris) 1963 

Sibert, Elbert Ernest, Jr. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
and Nonresident Associate of Lovett College 
BA. (Rice) 1963; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Simons, Verne Franklin. Associate Professor of Accounting 
A.B. (Kansas) 1923; A.M. (Kansas) 1925; C.P.A. 1931 

Sims, James Redding. Professor of Civil Engineering and Campus 
Business Manager 
B.S. in C.E. (Rice) 1941; M.S. (Illinois) 1950; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1956 

Slayton, W. J. Instructor in Germanics 
B.A. (U. of Kansas) 1964; M.A. (Rice) 1967 

Smith, Gordon W. Assistant Professor of Economics and Business 
Administration 
A.B. (Washington University) 1956; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1966 

SoGA, Naohiro. Assistant Professor of Space Science and Engineering 
B.S. (Kyoto University) 1957; M.S. (Kyoto University) 1959; Ph.D. (Kyoto Uni- 
versity) 1963 

SoLiGO, Ronald. Associate Professor of Economics and Resident As- 
sociate of Hanszen College 
B.A. (British Columbia) 1958; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Spears, Monroe Kirk. Libbie Shean Moody Professor of English 

A.B. (South CaroUna) 1937; A.M. (South CaroHna) 1937; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1940 

Spence, Dale William. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education and Nonresident Associate of Wiess College 
B.S. (Rice) 1956; M.S. (North Texas) 1959 

Staley, Earl V. Instructor in Fine Arts 

B.A. (Illinois Wesleyan) 1960; M.A. (Arkansas) 1963 

Stanton, Neil. Visiting Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D. (New South Wales) 1964 

Stavenhagen, Lee. Assistant Professor of German and Nonresident As- 
sociate of Lovett College 
B.A. (Texas) 1958; M.A. (Texas) 1960; Ph.D. (California) 1964 

Stebbings, Ronald F. Professor of Space Science 
B.Sc. (London) 1952; Ph.D. (London) 1956 

Stevens, Robert V. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Faculty As- 
sociate of Jones College 
B.S. (Iowa State) 1963; Ph.D. (Indiana) 1966 

Stokes, Gale. Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. (Colgate) 1954; M.A. (Indiana) 1965 

Storck, Roger Louis. Professor of Biology and Nonresident Associate 
of Hanszen College 

M.S. (Inst. Industries de Fermentation— Meurice Chimie Brussels, Belgium) 
1946; Ph.D. (Illinois) 1960 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 29 

SuBTELNY, Stephen. Professor of Biology 

B.A. (Hobart) 1949; M.A, (Missouri) 1952; Ph.D. (Missouri) 1955 

Talmage, Roy V. Professor of Biology and Master of Wiess College 
A.B. (Maryville) 1938; M.A. (Richmond) 1940; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1947 

Tappan, Donald Willard. Assistant Professor of French and Faculty 
Associate of Jones College 
A.B. (Hamilton) 1963; M.A. (Rice) 1956; Ph.D. (Yale) 1964 

Thomas, Joseph David. Associate Professor of English 
Ph.B. (Chicago) 1929; A.M. (Chicago) 1930 

Thrall, Robert M. Professor of Mathematical Science 

B.A. (Illinois College) 1935; M.A. (U. of Illinois) 1935; Ph.D. (U. of Illinois) 
1937; H.Sc.D. (Illinois College) 1960 

Tittel, Frank. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.A. (Oxford) 1955; M.A. (Oxford) 1959; Ph.D. (Oxford) 1959 

Todd, Anderson. Professor of Architecture and Nonresident Associate 
of Weiss College 
A.B. (Princeton) 1943; M.FA. (Princeton) 1949 

ToPAzio, Virgil. Professor of French, Dean of Humanities and Social 
Sciences and Nonresident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Wesleyan) 1943: M.A. (Columbia) 1947; Ph.D. (Columbia) 1951 

Trammell, George Thomas. Professor of Physics 
B.A. (Rice) 1944; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1950 

Tsanoff^ Radoslav Andrea. Trustee Distinguished Professor of Hu- 
manities and Honorary Nonresident Associate of Will Rice College 
B.A. (Oberlin) 1906; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1910; L.H.D. (Oklahoma) 1966 

Tucker, W. H. Assistant Professor of Space Science 

B.S. (Oklahoma) 1961; M.S. (Oklahoma) 1962; Ph.D. (California) 1966 

Turner, Richard Baldwin. Professor of Chemistry and Faculty Asso- 
ciate of Jones College 
A.B. (Harvard) 1938; A.M. (Harvard) 1940; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1942 

Ulrich, Floyd Edward. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. in E.E. (Union) 1926; M.S. in E.E. (Union) 1928; A.M. (Harvard) 1929; 
Ph.D. (Harvard) 1938 

Urrutibeheity, Hector N. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A. (La Plata National College) 1952; Profesorado de Universidad (La Plata 
National University) 1956 

Vandiver, Frank Everson. Harris Masterson, Jr., Professor of Histoiy 
and Honorary Nonresident Associate of Hanszen College 
M.A. (Texas) 1949; M.A. (Oxford) 1963; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1951 

VAN HouTEN, James K. Instructor in German and Resident Associate 
of Baker College 
A.B. (Hunter) 1959 

Vann, William Pennington. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.A. (Columbia) 1958; B.S. (Columbia) 1959; M.S. (Columbia) 1960; PhJ). 
(Rice) 1966 



30 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Veletsos, Anestis Stravrou. Brown and Root Professor of Engineering 
B.S. (Robert) 1948; M.S. (Illinois) 1950; Ph.D. (Ilinois) 1953 

Velz, John William. Assistant Professor of English and Nonresident 
Associate of Will Rice College 
A.B. (Michigan) 1953; A.M. (Michigan) 1954; Ph.D. (Minnesota) 1963 

ViEBiG, Van R. Lecturer in Accounting 
B.A. (Rice) 1962 

VON der Mehden, Fred R. Professor of Political Science 

B.A. (U. of Pacific) 1948; M.A. (Claremont) 1950; Ph.D. (Berkeley) 1957 

Wadsworth, Philip A. Professor of French 
A.B. (Yale) 1935; Ph.D. (Yale) 1939 

Walker, James B. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S. (Rice) 1943; M.A. (Texas) 1949; Ph.D. (Texas) 1952 

Walker, William F. Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering 
B.S. (Texas) 1960; M.S. (Texas) 1961; Ph.D. (Oklahoma State) 1966 

Walters, Geoffrey King. Professor of Physics and Space Science, As- 
sociate Dean of Engineering and Science, and Nonresident Asso- 
ciate of Lovett College 
B.A. (Rice) 1953; Ph.D. (Duke) 1956 

Wang, Chao-Cheng. Professor of Mathematical Science 

B.S. (Taiwan) 1959; M.A. (U. of Delaware) 1962; Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 1965 

Wann, Trenton William. Professor of Psychology, Master of Jones 
College and Honorary Nonresident Associate of Will Rice College 
A.B. (California) 1937; Ph.D. (California) 1949 

Ward, Calvin H. Associate Professor of Biology and Environmental 
Science 
B.S. (New Mexico State) 1955; M.A. (Cornell) 1957; Ph.D. (Cornell) 1960 

Ward, Joseph A., Jr. Professor of English and Faculty Associate of 
Brown College 
A.B. (Notre Dame) 1952; M.A. (Tulane) 1954; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1957 

Warme, John E. Assistant Professor of Geology 
B.A. (Augustana) 1959; Ph.D. (U.C.L.A.) 1966 

Warren, David B. Lecturer in Fine Arts 
A.B. (Princeton) 1959; M.A. (Delaware) 1965 

Wells, Raymond O. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. (Rice) 1962; M.S. (N.Y.U.) 1964; Ph.D. (N.Y.U.) 1966 

Wiener, Martin J. Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (Brancleis) 1962; M.A. (Harvard) 1963; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1967 

WiERUM, Frederic Atherton, Jr. Associate Professor of Mechanical 
and Aerospace Engineering and Nonresident Associate of Lovett 
College 
B.S. in M.E. (Wichita) 1955; M.S. in M.E. (Houston) 1959; Ph.D. (Rice) 1962 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 31 

WiEST, Jerome D. Associate Professor of Management Science 

B.S. (Utah) 1951; M.B.A. (Harvard) 1958; M.S. (Carnegie Tech.) 1962; Ph.D. 
(Carnegie Tech.) 1963 

WiLDERMUTH, Karl. Visiting Professor of Physics 
Ph.D. (Gottingcn) 1949 

W'lLHOiT, James Cammack, Jr. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. in M.E. (Rice) 1948; M.S. (Texas A & M) 1951; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1954 

Wilson, James Lee, Professor of Geology 

B.A. (Texas) 1942; M.A. (Texas) 1944; Ph.D. (Yale) 1949 

Wilson, Joseph Benjamin. Associate Professor of German and Non- 
resident Associate of Weiss College 
B.A. (Rice) 1950; M.A. (Rice) 1953; Ph.D. (Stanford) 1960 

Winkler, Michael. Assistant Professor of Germanics 

A.B. (St. Benedict's College) 1961; A.M. (Colorado) 1963; Ph.D. (Colorado) 1966 

Wischmeyer, Carl Riehle. Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S. in E.E. (Rose Polytechnic) 1937; M.Eng. in E.E. (Yale) 1939; E.E. (Rose 
Polytechnic) 1942 

Wolf, Richard A. Assistant Professor of Space Science 
B.A. (Cornell) 1962; Ph.D. (California Inst, of Tech.) 1965 

Wong, Kellogg. Assistant Professor of Architecture and Nojiresident 
Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. (Georgia Inst, of Tech.) 1948; B.Arch. (Georgia Inst, of Tech.) 1952; 
M.Arch. (Cranbrook Academy of Arts) 1958 

Wood, Donald Ira. Professor of Education 

B.A. (San Antonio) 1942; M.Ed. (Trinity University) 1954; Ph.D. (Texas) 1961 

Yap, Leonard Yau-Hock. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. (Hong Kong) 1960; M.S. (Washington) 1962; Ph.D. (Washington) 1967 

Young, Richard D. Associate Professor of Economics and Mathemati- 
cal Science 

B.A. (Minnesota) 1951; M.A. (Minnesota) 1954; Ph.D. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 
1965 



Professional Research Staff 

Alabastro, Estrella B. F. Research Associate in the Bio-Medical 
Engineering Laboratory 
B.S. (Philippines) 1961; M.S. (Rice) 1965; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Arden, Richard C. Postdoctoral Felloio in Chemistry 
A.B. (Princeton) 1962; Ph.D. (Philadelphia) 1967 

Arme, Christopher. Research Associate in Biology 
B.Sc. (Leeds) 1961; Ph.D. (Leeds) 1964 

Asano, Koichi. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemical Engineering 
B.A. (Tokyo) 1960; M.A. (Tokyo) 1962; Ph.D. (Tokyo) 1965 



32 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

AvASTHi, SuRGiT. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemical Engineering 
B.Sc. (India) 1961; Ph.D. (India) 1967 

Beam, John E. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Laboratory 
B.S. (Kansas) 1958; A.M. (Harvard) 1959; Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1966 

Bettoney, George. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. (Rochester) 1964; Ph.D. (Oregon) 1967 

Bhakar, Balram S. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Labora- 
tory 

B.S. (Agra University) 1957; M.S. (Aligarh Muslim U.) 1960; Ph.D. (Delhi Uni- 
versity) 1966 

Blum, Lesser. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. (Buenos Aires) 1954; Ph.D. (Buenos Aires) 1956 

Browning, Luolin. Research Associate in Biology 
B.Sc. (Rice) 1936; Ph.D. (Rice) 1951 

Canada, Thomas R. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Labora- 
tory 
B.S. (Indiana) 1962; M.S. (Indiana) 1965; Ph.D. (Indiana) 1967 

Charlu, Tharimala Venugopala, Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
M.Sc. (Rajputana) 1956; Ph.D. (Indian Inst, of Science) 1964 

Collins Jon Gerald. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. (Brandon, Canada) 1961; Ph.D. (Alberta, Canada) 1966 

Crowe, Cameron M. Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 
B.Engineering (McGill) 1953; Ph.D. (Cambridge) 1957 

Drum, George. Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 

B.A. (Catawba) 1962; M.S. (Tulane) 1964; Ph.D. (Tulane) 1966 

Eather, Robert. Research Associate in Space Science 
B.Sc. (New South Wales) 1961; Ph.D. (New South Wales) 1965 

Guhr, Uwe. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (Technische Hochschule, Aachen) 1962; M.S. (Technische Hochschule, 
Aachen) 1964; Ph.D. (Technische Hochschule, Aachen) 1966 

Harris, Ben. Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 
Ph.D. (Oklahoma State) 1966 

Hastie, John William. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. (Tasmania) 1961; Ph.D. (Tasmania) 1967 

Hatfield, L. L. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Laboratory 
Ph.D. (Arkansas) 1966 

Hudson, Paul D. Research Associate in Space Science 

B.A. (Cambridge) 1962; M.S. (Manchester) 1963; Ph.D. (Manchester) 1966 

IssEROFF, Hadar. Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 

B.S. (Brooklyn) 1960; M.S. (Purdue) 1963; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1966 

Joseph, Claude. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Laboratory 
Ph.D. (Lausanne) 1966 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 33 

Karakashian, Marlene. Research Associate in Biology 
B.A. (Northwestern) 1955; Ph.D. (California) 1961 

Kavanagh, Lawrence D., Jr. Research Associate in Space Science 
B.S. (Notre Dame) 1964; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

KuRFESS, James D. Research Associate in Space Science 

B.S. (Case Inst, of Tech.) 1962; M.S. (Case Inst, of Tech.) 1963; Ph.D. (Case 
Inst, of Tech.) 1967 

LuTFiYYA, Abdullah. Senior Research Associate in Sociology 

B.A. (Wm. Penn) 1952; M.A. (Michigan State) 1954; Ph.D. (Michigan State) 1960 

Maehlum, Bernt. Senior Research Associate in Space Science 
A.B. (Oslo) 1953; M.S. (Oslo) 1955; Ph.D. (Oslo) 1961 

Marsal, Juan F. Research Associate in Behavioral Science 

J.S.D. (Barcelona) 1961; M.A. (Princeton) 1964; Ph.D. (Princeton) 1965 

May, Robert. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemical Engineering 
B.S. (Texas A&M) 1964; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Mende, Stephen Bela. Research Associate in Space Science 
B.Sc. (London) 1961; Ph.D. (London) 1965 

MiNKiN, Cedric. Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 
B.S. (Maine) 1962; Ph.D. (Maine) 1967 

MuENOW, David W. Research Associate in Chemistry 
B.S. (Carleton College) 1961; Ph.D. (Purdue) 1967 

MuRTY, A. Narasimha. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.Sc. (Andra) 1957; M.Sc. (Andra) 1958; D.Sc. (Andra) 1963 

Murty, T. S. S. R. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.Sc. (Osmania, India) 1957; M.Sc. (Osmania, India) 1959; M.A.(Princeton) 1964; 
Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 1%7 

Niiler, Andrus. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Laboratory 
Ph.D. (Worchester Polytech Inst.) 1966 

PiCHAT, Phillippe. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
Ph.D. (Faculte des Sciences de Lyon, France) 1966 

Pritchard, Robert E. Research Associate in Mechanical and Aero- 
space Engineering and Materials Science 
B.S. (Purdue) 1959; M.S. (Washington) 1964 

Ramirez, Manuel. Research Associate in Behavioral Science 
B.A. (Texas) 1960; Ph.D. (Texas) 1963 

Reddy, S. Raghupathi Rami. Research Associate in Biology 
M.Sc. (S.V., India) 1961; Ph.D. (S.V., India) 1966 

Rosenberg, Theodore J. Research Associate in Space Science 
B.E.E. (City College of New York) 1960; Ph.D. (California) 1965 

Sanchez, Gilbert. Postdoctoral Fellow in Biology 
B.S. (New Mexico State) 1961; Ph.D. (Kansas) 1967 



34 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Spiger, Robert John. Research Associate in Physics 
B.S. (Washington) 1962; Ph.D. (Case Inst, of Tech.) 1967 

SuNDERMANN, RuDOLF. Postdoctoval Fcllow Ifi Chemistry 
Ph.D. (Cologne) 1966 

Terenzi, Hector. Research Associate in Biology 
Licenciado (Buenos Aires) 1961 

Threadgold, Lawrence T. Senior Research Associate in Biology 
B.A. (Trinity College, Ireland) 1952; Ph.D. (Trinity College, Ireland) 1955 

TsAi, Mao Jen. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemical Engineering 
B.S. (National Taiwan University) 1962; Ph.D. (Rice) 1967 

Uy, O. Manuel. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.S. (LaSalle College. Philippines) 1961; Ph.D. (Case Inst, of Tech.) 1966 

Velkley, Donald E. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Labora- 
tory 
B.S. (Kentucky) 1963; M.S. (Kentucky) 1966; Ph.D. (Kentucky) 1967 

Von Witsch, Wolfram H. Research Associate, T. W. Bonner Nuclear 
Laboratory 
Ph.D. (Heidelberg) 1967 

Wilson, Paul W. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. (Melbourne) 1963; Ph.D. (Melbourne) 1967 

Yergey, Alfred L. Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 
B.S. (Muhlenberg) 1963; Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1967 

Young, W. Research Associate in Physics 

B.Sc. (Birmingham, England) 1961; Ph.D. (Birmingham, England) 1965 

Professional Staff of the Library 

Abrams, Frederick. Junior Librarian R.I.C.E. 
B.A. (Florida) 1965; M.L.S. (Emory) 1967 

Allspach, Elizabeth Ann. Catalog Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1960. M.L.S. (California) 1961 

Baxter, Susanna Gorton. Bibliographer 

B.A. (Texas) 1927; M.A. (Texas) 1935; M.L.S. (Texas) 1959 

Bishop, Martha. Catalog Librarian 
Ph.D. (Munich) 1947 

Brand, Marvine. Science Librarian 
B.A. (Mississippi) 1946 

Craig, Hardin, Jr. Librarian 

A.B. (Princeton) 1929; A.M. (Harvard) 1931; Ph.D. (Harvard) 1937 

Dean, Alice Crowell. Librarian Emerita and Archivist 
B.A. (Rice) 1916; M.A. (Rice) 1919 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 35 

Garcia, John. Acqiiisitions Research Librarian 

B.A. (Instituto General y Tecnico de Ponteuedra, Spain) 1934; Certificate ol 
law (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Spain) 1936; L.S. (Montevideo, 
Uruguay) 196S 

Graham, Rose. Acquisitions Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1964; S.M. in L.S. (Simmons) 1965 

Hamilton, Mary Alice. Gifts and Exchanges Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1932 

Jameson, Florence. Serials Librarian 
B.A.(Rice) 1918 

Johnson, Joyce. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (Louisiana State University) 1941; B.S. in L.S. (Louisiana State) 1942 

Lane, Sarah Louise. Circulatioyi Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1919; B.S. in L.S. (Columbia) 1932 

Lappala, Jane. Acquisitions Librarian 
B.A. (Wisconsin) 1933; B.L.S. (Wisconsin) 1942 

Mayfield, James Lee. Head of Circulation Department 
B.A. (Colorado State) 1958; M.A. in L.S. (Denver) 1960 

McGeever, Nancy Booth. Acquisitions Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1952; M.S. in L.S. (Catholic University) 1965 

O'Keeffe, Richard L. Associate Librarian 

Ph.B. (Mount Carmel) 1949; M.S. in L.S. (Louisiana State) 1956 

Paddock, Rita L. Head, Science Information Services 

A.B. (Western Maryland College) 1960; M.L.S. (Carnegie Inst, of Tech.) 1951 

Perrine, Richard H. Reference Librarian 
B.F.A. (Yale) 1940; M.L.S. (Texas) 1961 

Redmon, Alice Jane. Acting Head Catalog Librarian 
B.A. (Denver) 1937 

Reindl, Ellene a. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (Rice) 1956; M.S. in L.S. (Columbia) 1962 

Ruecking, Frederick, C., Jr. Head of Data Processing 
B.A. (Texas) 1952; M.A. (Texas) 1955; A.M.L.S. (Michigan) 1963 

Silversteen, Sophie. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (Rice) 1952; M.S. (Texas) 1954; M.L.S. (Texas) 1964 

TuRNBULL, Pender. Bibliographer and Curator of Rare Book Room 
B.A. (Rice) 1919 

Uhrig, Susie. Serials Librarian 
B.A. (Rice) 1927 

Vermeulen, June. Acquisitions Librarian 
B.A. (Nottingham) 1956 

Zimmerman, Thomas. Music and Fine Arts Librarian 
B.A. (Free University of Berlin) 1962 



36 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

ZiNGLER, GiLBERTA M. Head of Acquisitions Department 
A.B. (Butler) 1932; B.S. in L.S. (Illinois) 1935 



Professional Staff of the Research 
Computation Laboratory 

Cole, Carol Lynn. Programmer 
B.A. (Lamar Tech.) 1964 

Harris, Fred H. Assistant Director 
B.S. (North Carolina) 1960 

Harris, G. P. Administrative Systems Analyst 
B.S. (Baylor) 1955 

Lane, Joni Sue. Senior Programmer 
B.S. (Oklahoma) 1960 

Paling, William A. Operations Manager 

Phillips, Ann Morgan. Programmer 
B.A. (Texas) 1964 

Rachford, Henry H., Jr. Director 

B.S. (Rice) 1945; M.A. (Rice) 1947; Sc.D. (M.I.T.) 1950 

Simon, Olinda. Senior Programmer 

B.S. (Virginia) 1963; M.A. (George Washington) 1964 



Staff of the Health Service 

Skaggs, Ray Hamilton. Medical Director, Student Health Service 
B.A. (Rice) 1942; M.D. (Texas) 1945 

Smith, Edward Thomas. Athletic Team Physician 
M.D. (Baylor) 1929 



Staff of the Athletic Department 

Bale, Allen Melbert, Assistant Coach of Football 
Bartosh, Gilbert Charles. Assistant Coach of Football 
BossoNS, Robert R, Assistant Coach of Football 
Brickels, Robert J. Assistant Coach of Basketball 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 37 

Brunson, Emmett Evander. Business Manager of Athletics and Coach 
of Track and Field 

Davis, Allen Baker. Coach of Freshman Football and Assistant Bas- 
ketball Coach 

Davis, Joe Wallace. Line Coach of Football 

Erfurth, August Fred, Jr. Assistant Coach of Track and Field and 
Concessions Manager 

GiAMMALVA, Samuel Antone. Coach of Tennis 

Grigg, Cecil Burkett. Assistant Coach of Football 

Hagan, Harold B. Head Coach of Football and Director of Athletics 

Hess, James Ray. Coach of Freshman Football 

Knodel, Don R. Head Basketball Coach 

Lanza, Nick. Assistant Coach of Football 

May, John Robert. Assistant Business Manager of Athletics and As- 
sistant Track Coach 

Moore, Charles Edward, Jr. Assistant Coach of Football 

Neely, Jess Claiborne. Athletic Director Emeritus 

Osburn, Douglas Edward. Coach of Baseball 

Roth, Bertram. Band Director 

Whitmore, William Rogers. Athletic Publicity Director 

Winburn, Ray Crittenton. Academic Counselor in Athletics 



University Standing Committees 

1968-69 

The President is ex officio a member of all committees. 

Committee on Admissions: Mr. Giles, chairman; Messrs. Cheatham, 
DoNOHO, Fulton, Horn, Krahl, Matusow, Merwin, Milburn, 
MoREHEAD, Parish, Ulrich, C. H. Ward, Mrs. Brown, and Mrs. 
Raaphorst; Jeffrey Hanes, student consultant; the Dean of 
Undergraduate Affairs, ex officio. 

Committee on Campus Safety: Mr. Franklin, chairman; Captain 
Potter, Messrs. Kobayashi, Parsons, and Van Houten; Daniel 
King and Robert Howard Wilson, student members; Mr. Berling, 
consultant. 

Committee on Computers: Mr. Rachford, chairman; Messrs. Ander- 
son, Clark, Holt, Lane, Levy, Orvedahl, Resnikoff, Salsburg, 

SCHUM, AND SiBERT; THE DeAN OF ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE, CX 

officio; Mr. F. Harris and Mr. Ruecking, consultants. 

Education Council: Mr. McEnany, chairman; Messrs. Bearden, 
Brooks, Bryan, Castaneda, Doughtie, Eisenberg, Hess, Higgin- 
BOTHAM, Levin, Shelton, Ulrich, J. B. Wilson, and Wood; the 
Dean of Humanities and Social Science, ex officio. 

Committee on Examinations and Standing: Mr. McEnany, chairman; 
Messrs. Brooks, F. M. Fisher, Gruber, Huddle, B. F. Jones, Puppe, 
AND W. F. Walker; the Registrar, ex officio; Robert Atherton, 
student consultant. (This committee also serves as the Professional 
Advisory Committee.) 

Faculty Council: The President, chairman; the Chancellor; the 
Dean of Graduate Studies; the Dean of Engineering and Science; 
THE Dean of Humanities and Social Science; Messrs. Leland (1969), 
RiMLiNGER (1969), Chapman (1970), Sass (1971), Vandiver (1971), and 
Brotzen (1972). 

Graduate Council: Mr. Pitzer, chairman; Mr. Richter, executive 
officer; Messrs. Burchfiel, Hyman, Krzyzaniak, Rabson, Spears, 
Storck, and Wierum. 

Humanities Research Council: Mr. Vandiver, chairman; Messrs. 
Kahn, Kolenda, J. A. Ward and Mrs. Raaphorst; the Dean of 
Humanities and Social Science, ex officio. 

38 



UNIVERSITY STANDING COMMITTEES 39 

Committee on the Library: Mr. Leeds, chairman; Messrs. Ambler, 

COPELAND, DOUGHTIE, HaYMES, RaTH, SiBERT AND WiEST; Ed 

Douglas, student member; Mr. O'Keefe, consultant. 

The Rice University Marshals: Mr. Freeman, Chief Marshal, Messrs. 
Stewart A. Baker, Carrington, S. H. Davis, Garside, Grob, Har- 
wooD, McClellan; Mr. Bunger, consultant. 

Committee on Outdoor Sports: Mr. Chapman, chairman; Messrs. 
Castaneda, Rorschach, Vandiver; Mr. Rufus King (representative 
of the R Association); Mr. James A. Williams (representative of 
the Alumni Association); Mr. James U. Teague (representative of 
the Board of Governors). 

Committee on Religious Activities: Mr. Nielsen, chairman; Messrs. 
Bale, Burrus, Martin, Rimlinger, and Tsanoff; William Goggin 
and Greg Scharf, student members. 

R. O. T. C. Committee: Mr. J. A. S. Adams, chairman; the Professor 
OF Military Science; the Professor of Naval Science; Messrs. 
BowEN, Gerhardt, Grob, Rudee, and Wischmeyer; John Zerdecki, 
student member. 

Committee on Schedules: Mr. Curl, chairman; Messrs. Gruber, 
Rudee, Sibert, and Young; the Registrar, ex officio; Mr. Bunger, 
consultant. 

Committee on Scholarships and Awards: Mr. McEnany, chairman; 
Messrs. Garside, Lankford, Mitchell, and Turner, Mrs. Good- 
man; Mr. Wilkens, consultant. 

Science and Engineering Research Council: Mr. Brotzen, chairman; 
Messrs. Dessler, Hellums, Levy, Read, and Turner; the Dean 
OF Engineering and Science, ex officio. 

Committee on Student Financial Aid: Mr. McEnany, chairman, 
Messrs. Besen, Clayton, Giles, Hodges, Pfeiffer, and James L. 
Wilson; Mr. Wilkens, consultant. 

Committee on Student Health: Mr. Price-Williams, chairman; Dr. 
Skaggs, executive officer; Messrs. Cuthbertson and Eggert, Mrs. 
Poindexter and Miss Cason; David Gerth, student member; the 
Dean of Students, ex officio; the Chairman and the Most Recent 
Past Chairman of the College Masters, ex officio. 

Committee on Rice University Studies: Mrs. Drew, chairman; Messrs. 
Camden, Campbell, Cooper, and Mrs. Raaphorst. 

Committee on Undergraduate Affairs: Mr. McEnany, chairman; 
Messrs. Milburn, Pfeifer, Sass, Talmage, and Wann, Mrs. Poin- 
dexter; Nancy Dietz, Thomas Plant, and Warren Skaaren, stu- 
dent members; the Chancellor, ex officio. 



40 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum: Mr. Margrave, chair- 
man; Messrs. Stephen D. Baker, Brotzen, Deans, Kolenda, 
Resnikoff, Rimlinger, and Schum; Barry Kaplan and Mike Penn 
Smith, student members; the Dean of Undergraduate Affairs, ex 
officio. 

Committee on Undergraduate Teaching: Mr. Sass, chairman; Messrs. 
Burrus, Brotzen, Garside, Parish, Philpott, Rorschach, Tsanoff 
and Wann; Craig Davis and Lee Buddrus, student members. 

Committee on University Welfare: Faculty Council Representatives: 
Sass, Vandiver, Brotzen; Messrs. Parsons (1969), Wierum (1969), 
Duck (1970), Milburn (1970), Burrus (1971), and Clayton (1971). 



Part Two 

General Information 

Historical Sketch of the University 

The University Campus and Facilities 

Chairs and Lectureships 



The University and Its Campus 

Historical Sketch of the University 

William Marsh Rice University was founded in Houston, Texas, as 
the William M. Rice Institute by William Marsh Rice. The founder 
did not live to see the beginning of instruction at the institution, but 
his ashes rest in the base of a bronze statue by John Angel located in 
the center of the Academic Court. The Rice Institute became Rice 
University on July I, 1960. 

The Rice Institute was incorporated in 1891 under a charter per- 
mitting large freedom in the organization of a university to be dedi- 
cated to the "Advancement of Literature, Science, and Art." The 
Board of Trustees on December 28, 1907, appointed Dr. Edgar Odell 
Lovett, professor of mathematics and head of the astronomy depart- 
ment at Princeton University, to be the first president of the Rice Insti- 
tute. After careful and extended planning, the new university was 
opened in September, 1912, to an entering class of seventy-seven stu- 
dents. A three-day academic festival was held on October 10-12, 1912, 
as a formal celebration of the opening. A similar festival on October 
10-12, 1962, commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the University. 

Enrollment expanded rapidly during the early years, and by 1924 a 
policy was established of admitting annually only about 450 under- 
graduate students. No restriction was placed on the admission of 
qualified graduate students. Under the Ten Year Plan adopted by 
the Board of Governors in the summer of 1964, enrollment will be 
expanded gradually until it reaches approximately 4,000 by 1975, of 
which approximately 28 per cent will be graduate students. Begin- 
ning with the year 1965-66, tuition was charged by the University 
and a very liberal program of tuition scholarships established to carry 
out the intention of the Board that no quahfied student be denied 
admission because of inability to pay tuition. 

Dr. Lovett, who died in 1957, became president emeritus in 1946, 
when Dr. William V. Houston, professor of physics at the California 
Institute of Technology, assumed the presidency. When Dr. Houston 
retired as president in 1960, Dr. Carey Croneis, provost and professor 
of geology at Rice, served as acting president. In July, 1961, Dr. Ken- 
neth S. Pitzer, professor of chemistry and dean of the College of Chem- 
istry at the University of California at Berkeley, became Rice's third 
president and chief executive officer. At that time Dr. Croneis became 
chancellor and Dr. Houston honorary chancellor of the University. 

43 



44 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

A new era of rapid development for the University began at the 
close of World War II. The Board of Trustees developed during the 
war years a long-range plan based upon the goal of providing espe- 
cially good training for a limited number of students, "with a well- 
developed and strong curriculum in the arts and letters and with the 
emphasis on science and research that is required to meet changing 
circumstances." These plans were vigorously executed. New depart- 
ments were added, the faculty was increased from less than seventy to 
more than two hundred, admission requirements were raised, curric- 
ula were revised, and a great expansion was made in graduate study 
and research. In the academic year 1966-67 there were nearly seven 
hundred students working for the master's or the doctor's degree. 
Nearly sixty postdoctoral fellows and research associates were engaged 
in investigations in the University laboratories. 

The University in 1961 made available to the National Aeronau- 
tics and Space Administration a site on Clear Lake near Houston for 
the construction of an $80,000,000 Manned Space Flight Laboratory, 
and in 1962-63 it established a Department of Space Science at the 
graduate level to give training in this field. 

Following the arrival of President Pitzer, the preparation of a 
long-range plan for the future of the University was begun by a study 
committee in 1962. The completed projection was adopted by 
the Board of Governors on August 19, 1964, under the title of "A 
Ten Year Plan for Rice University, 1965-1975." 

The plan was developed in conformity with the following state- 
ment of purpose: "Rice University's goal and aspiration is to be a 
university of the highest quality serving not only as an educational 
center of excellence for selected students of high intellectual ability, 
motivation, and personal qualifications, but also as a center of crea- 
tivity where new knowledge and new ideas result from research and 
other scholarly-creative activities." The plan emphasizes the interac- 
tion of graduate and undergraduate education and seeks to encour- 
age the "increasing interdependence of teaching and research for stu- 
dents and faculty." To realize these objectives, the faculty will be in- 
creased to just under 400 in 1975, and the number of students will 
be raised to some 4,000 from the present level of about 2,800. Prior- 
ity is given to the strengthening of the traditional core of academic 
studies, but the plan also envisions the possible creation at the gradu- 
ate level of selected professional schools. 

Since 1949 the directing body of the University has been the Board 
of Governors of fifteen members. This consists of the seven perma- 
nent trustees and of eight governors appointed by the trustees for 
staggered terms of four years. A new body, the Rice University As- 
sociates, was formed in 1954 to provide a channel for the free ex- 
change of ideas between the faculty and a group of representative 
citizens with influence in the civic, cultural, and educational affairs 
of the region. 



THE UNIVERSITY AND ITS CAMPUS 45 



The University Campus and 
Facilities 

Rice University occupies a spacious and well-kept campus of some 
three hundred acres on South Main Street about three miles from the 
center of the city of Houston. There are at present more than thirty 
major buildings and groups of buildings exclusive of the Rice Sta- 
dium. The harmonious proportions of these buildings and their in- 
triguing architectural features combine with the natural beauty of the 
campus to form a setting of rare charm in which the students and 
faculty may pursue their respective tasks. 

Architectural distinction was an acknowledged goal of the trustees 
in 1910 when they accepted a general long-range plan prepared by 
Ralph Adams Cram, which combined beauty and utility and exhib- 
ited attractive elements of Italian, French, and Spanish architecture. 
When the Rice Institute was formally opened in the fall of 1912, the 
administration building (now Lovett Hall), the mechanical engineer- 
ing building and powerhouse, and two residential halls for men had 
been completed— all in a style inspired by the Romanesque of Lom- 
bardy. The same style of architecture was exhibited in the physics 
and chemistry laboratories, two additional residential halls, and 
Cohen House (the faculty club) erected during the period from 1915 
to 1928. 

There was little further change in the campus until after World 
War II, but there has been a spectacular growth in the physical plant 
since that time as the long-range plans of the trustees began to be 
implemented. The new buildings are somewhat less ornate than the 
older ones, but they have all been carefully designed to harmonize 
with them, and they exhibit architectural excellence in their own 
right. 

Undergraduate Facilities. In the Fondren Library are extensive col- 
lections of books and periodicals in the sciences, social studies, techni- 
cal fields and the humanities with ample reading rooms open to un- 
dergraduates for study and recreational reading. Well-equipped labo- 
ratories are provided for instruction in the basic sciences, engineer- 
ing, the social sciences, and architecture. Computers are available for 
use in various courses when appropriate. 

Hamman Auditorium, equipped for both lectures and stage pre- 
sentations, is the scene of many student productions, lectures by lead- 
ing scholars, and concerts. In the Rice Memorial Center are the Cam- 
pus Store, a cafeteria, and recreational facilities as well as offices of 
the alumni association, the placement bureau, and the student gov- 
ernment and publications. Each of the residential colleges on the 
campus contains lounges, a dining room, and residential areas. Adja- 



46 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

cent to each is the residence of the Master of the College and his 
family. Complete gymnasium facilities are open to all students. 

Graduate Facilities. Modern, well-equipped laboratories and librar- 
ies provide excellent opportunities for research in many fields. The 
biology, chemistry, geology and physics laboratories are each housed 
in a separate building providing space and equipment for research in 
several areas. The Bonner Nuclear Research Laboratories contain a 
six-million-volt Van de Graaff generator and a twelve-million-volt Van 
de Graaff tandem generator. The Laboratory for Space Science also 
houses research in materials science, metallurgy, and astronautical en- 
gineering, in addition to the modern facilities of the Abercrombie 
Engineering Laboratories and the Ryon Engineering Laboratory. 
Herman Brown Hall, to be opened in 1968, will provide additional 
space for mathematics and for systems research in engineering and 
various sciences. 

The Fondren Library houses more than 525,000 volumes (not in- 
cluding microforms, of which there are more than 275,000 units). 
This figure represents adequate collections of basic materials in his- 
tory, literature, philosophy, German, French, Spanish, economics and 
the behavioral sciences, as well as in science and engineering. Several 
notable research collections are owned, including Civil War imprints, 
broadsides and manuscripts, Austrian history and literature, the 
Axson Collection of Restoration and Eighteenth Century plays, Ger- 
man language and literature, and extensive microform holdings of 
early American publications. A Graduate Library, to be completed in 
1968, will increase the total stack capacity to about 1,000,000 vol- 
umes; provide additional offices, carrels, and seminar rooms for the 
use of graduate students and faculty as well as a Graduate and Fac- 
ulty Research Center where rare books, manuscripts and other special 
materials will be housed; and add capability for expanding and ex- 
tending a system of library computer applications already well served 
by the presence of a library-housed computer. 



Chairs and Lectureships 

Throughout its history, Rice University has been especially fortu- 
nate in the number of its friends and benefactors. Some of these are 
memoriahzed in the names of buildings and special physical facili- 
ties; others have generously provided for the enrichment of the Uni- 
versity's intellectual life by establishing chairs and lectureships either 
on temporary or permanent bases. Rice takes pleasure in recognizing on 
these pages some of these contributors to its academic excellence. 

The Brown and Root Chair of Engineering 

The Halliburton Education Foundation established the Brown and 
Root chair in 1965. The first appointment was made in November, 
1965. 

The Louis Calder Professorship in Chemical Engineering 

This professorship was endowed by the Louis Calder Foundation 
in 1966. The first appointment was made in 1967. 

The Reginald Henry Hargrove Chair of Economics 

The Hargrove chair was established in 1958 in memory of Mr. 
Hargrove by Mrs. R. H. Hargrove and the Texas Eastern Transmis- 
sion Corporation. The Hargrove Professor took up residence in 1959. 

The William Petius Hobby Chair in American History 

The Hobby Chair was established in 1967 by the Hobby Founda- 
tion to honor the late Honorable William P. Hobby, former Gover- 
nor of the State of Texas. 

The Jesse H. Jones Professorship in Management 

In 1966 Houston Endowment, Inc. established a fund for the crea- 
tion of the Jesse H. Jones Professorship in Management in honor of 
the late Mr, Jones, who was a prominent Houston philanthropist and 
friend of Rice. 

The Mary Gibbs Jones Professorship in History 

Houston Endowment, Inc. established this Professorship in History 
in 1966 to honor the late Mrs. Mary Gibbs Jones, a friend and bene- 
factor of the University. 

The Edgar Odell Lovett Professorship in Mathematics 

Through the generosity of the Brown Foundation the Edgar Odell 
Lovett Professorship in Mathematics was established in 1966, honor- 
ing the University's first president. 

47 



48 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Chairs of Instruction Established by Mrs. Mamie Twyman Martel 

A bequest by Mrs. Mamie Twyman Martel provides for four chairs 
of instruction in fields of humanistic study. Support for two chairs 
was begun in September, 1962; the Henry S. Fox, Sr., Chair of In- 
struction in Economics and the Lena Gohlman Fox Chair of Instruc- 
tion in Sociology. It is expected that the two additional chairs of in- 
struction will be established in the future when sufficient funds be- 
come available. 

The Harris Masterson, Jr., Chair in History 

The late Reverend Harris Masterson, Jr., was deeply interested in 
Rice University through his activities as director of Autry House and 
his close personal association with Rice students through many years. 
His will provided a bequest to the University with which the Board 
of Governors established a memorial to him in this chair. 

Moody Foundation Chairs 

In 1964 the Moody Foundation established the Libbie Sheam 
Moody Professorship of English and the W. L. Moody, Jr., Professor- 
ship of Mathematics. 

The J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought 

This chair was established in 1953 by Mr. J. Newton Rayzor, a 
trustee of Rice University. Its purpose is to provide in the Rice curric- 
ulum for distinguished instruction in religious and philosophical 
ideas which have powerfully influenced the history of civilization. 

The David Rice Chair in Ethics 

This chair was established in 1967 and is supported by the Wil- 
liam Stamps Parish Fund. It honors David Rice, a nephew of the 
founder, William Marsh Rice. 

The Albert Thomas Chair of Political Science 

A gift from the Brown Foundation created the Albert Thomas 
chair in 1965 honoring the late Congressman Albert Thomas. 

The Isla and Percy Turner Professorship in Biblical Studies 
This professorship was endowed by the Turner Charitable Founda- 
tion in 1967. 

The William Ward Watkin Chair in Architecture 

The Watkin Chair in Architecture was established in 1958 to 
honor William Ward Watkin, the first Chairman of the Rice Archi- 
tecture Department. 



CHAIRS AND LECTURESHIPS 49 

The Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry 
The Robert A. Welch Foundation, in advancing the cause of basic 
chemical research in the Southwest, endowed a professorship in chem- 
istry which was first filled in 1963. 

The Harry Carothers Wiess Chair of Geology 

In 1952 Mrs. Olga Keith Wiess gave a substantial endowment to 
the University for the establishment of a chair of geology to be 
named in memory of her husband, late Vice Chairman of the Board 
of Governors of the University, in recognition of his profession and 
of his distinguished service to the University. Work in this depart- 
ment was inaugurated at both graduate and undergraduate levels in 
1954. 

The Bartlett Aesthetics Program 
Chamber music concerts and lectures have been sponsored from 
time to time by Dr. and Mrs. H. L. Bartlett. The first three Bartlett 
Lecturers were Dr. Theodore Green, D. Iredell Jenkins, and Dr. 
Radoslav A. Tsanofl. 

The Rockwell Lectures 

These lectures are made possible by the Rockwell Fund, Inc. They 
were inaugurated by Sir Robert Alexander Falconer in April, 1938. 
Among the distinguished lecturers in the series have been Dean 
Roscoe Pound, Professor William Ernest Hocking, Dr. Ralph W. 
Sockman, Dr. George A. Buttrick, Professor Charles W. Hendel, Pro- 
fessor Kenneth S. Latourette, Mr. Charles P. Taft, Dr. Henry P. Van 
Dusen, Dr. Conyers Read, Professor Theodore Greene, Dr. Joseph Sit- 
tler, Dr. J. W. F. Albright, Dr. Julian N. Hartt, Dr. Paul Ricoeur, 
and Dr. Albert Outler. 

The Shepherd School of Music 

Mrs. Sally Shepherd Perkins of Asheville, North Carolina, provided 
in 1950 for the establishment of a school of music at the University. 
It is contemplated that when the income from this endowment is of 
sufficient size, appropriate buildings and other facilities will be pro- 
vided for outstanding instruction in musical theory and appreciation. 
At present, income from the gift maintains a professorship and a num- 
ber of courses and activities in music. 

The Rice University Lectures 

From time to time Rice University invites scholars of distinction to 
lecture for varying periods. In most cases these lectures are open to 
the public as well as to the faculty and students. 



50 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

The Rice Television Series 

For over a decade Rice University has presented a series of pro- 
grams in cooperation with KTRK-TV, Houston. Various aspects of 
research in science, engineering, and the humanities at the University 
are discussed, as well as other topics of interest to the community. 



Part Three 

Information for 
Undergraduates 

Curricula and Degi^ees 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Programs 

Academic Regulations 

Admission of New Students 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 

Academic Honors and Awards 

Student Life 



Curricula and Degrees 

Rice University offers baccalaureate degrees in arts and sciences, 
engineering, architecture, accounting, commerce, and health and 
physical education. Students completing the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree with outstanding records are given recogni- 
tion with a designation of summa cum laude, magna cum, laude, or 
cum laude when the degree is awarded. Majors may be taken in an- 
thropology, architecture, art and history of art, behavioral science, 
biochemistry, biology, chemical physics, chemistry, classics, economics 
and business administration, English, French, geology, German, his- 
tory, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, 
sociology, or Spanish. The Bachelor of Arts degree is also awarded on 
successful completion of four-year curricula in chemical engineering, 
civil engineering, electrical engineering or mechanical engineering, 
which may be followed by a one-year integrated program terminating 
in a professional Master's degree or standard graduate programs 
leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. (See 
pp. 99-104.) The course of study in architecture is of five years' dura- 
tion and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture; the Bache- 
lor of Arts is conferred upon those who have satisfactorily completed 
the first four years in this curriculum. A five-year program in account- 
ing leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in that field; those who 
have completed the first four years in this curriculum receive the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. The degrees of Bachelor of Commerce and 
Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education are awarded 
after four years of study in their respective curricula. A program of 
teacher training within the undergraduate curricula may be followed 
by those interested in teaching in the secondary schools. Similarly, 
programs satisfying requirements for admission to dental, medical, 
and law schools are available. 

Honors Programs are offered for especially qualified students in 
several major fields of study in the academic and science areas. By 
various methods— small classes and seminars in which student partici- 
pation is emphasized, close contact with the faculty in methods of 
research, and extra reading and summer research projects— a student 
who qualifies for an Honors Program will be able to accelerate study 
in his major field and perhaps, in some cases, enter graduate study 
with advanced standing while earning an honors designation on re- 
ceipt of the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

53 



54 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Courses of Study 
Undergraduate Programs 

During their first two years the students are registered in the five 
basic curricula-humanities and social sciences (academic), science-engi- 
neering, architecture, commerce, and health and physical education. 
A considerable part of the work is prescribed during these two years, 
but throughout his four-year course each student pursues a broad 
program in the fundamental sciences and humanities rather than a 
narrow course of specialization. In each of the last two years, how- 
ever, the schedule of every student must be approved by his depart- 
ment of specialization. 

To assure that students will distribute choices of electives over an 
adequate range of subjects, courses are divided into three groups, and 
certain minimum requirements are specified in each group. The 
groups are: 

Group A— architecture, classics, English, fine arts, foreign languages, 

history, humanities, music, and philosophy 
Group B— anthropology, economics and business administration, 

education, linguistics, political science, psychology, and 

sociology 
Group C— biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, 

and physics 

Teacher Certification. Programs of study are offered to fulfill the 
Texas State requirements for teaching certificates on the secondary 
level in biology, chemistry, English, French, general science, German, 
health and physical education, histoi7, Latin, mathematics, physics, 
social studies, and Spanish. See page 151 for details. 

Predmedical and Prelaw Studies. Courses required for admission to 
any accredited American medical or law school can be met by proper 
selection of electives in any curriculum of the University. Interested 
students are encouraged to seek information and advice about courses 
and procedures from the Dean of Undergraduate Affairs. 

Academic Division 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

Majors are offered in Group A courses in art and history of art, 
classics, English, French, German, history, philosophy and Spanish. In 
Group B majors are available in anthropology, behavioral sciences, 
economics and business administration, political science, psychology 
and sociology. A major in biology, geology or mathematics may be 
taken in either the academic division or the science-engineering divi- 
sion. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 55 

Forty courses, each of at least three semester hours, or the equiva- 
lent, must be passed to satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. The specific requirements of both semesters of the first 
two years are detailed below followed by a general statement of the 
requirements of the third and fourth years. 

First Year 

(1) English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading, Thinking 
and Writing 

(2) History 100a, b. Europe since 1500 or History llOa, b. American 
History 

(3) Foreign Language* 

(4) Mathematics lOIa, b. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 
or Mathematics lOOa, b. Elementary Analysis 

(5) Biology lOOa, b. General Biology or Chemistry 120a, b. Intro- 
ductory and Analytical Chemistry, or Geology 200a, 201b. 
Physical and Historical Geology, or Physics 101a, b. Introduc- 
tory Survey of Physics, or Physics 100a. Mechanics and 100b. 
Introductory Relativity and Electricity and Magnetism 

(6) Basic Health and Physical Education 

(7) R.O.T.C, if elected 

note: Either the mathematics or science course may be postponed 
until the second or third year and a general Humanities course sub- 
stituted. 

Second Year 

(1) Science or Mathematics 

(2) Group A Elective 

(3) Group B Elective 

(4) Foreign language or elective* 

(5) Elective 

(6) R.O.T.C, if elected 

note: a second year student may not take more than two courses in 
one department in any semester. 

* Students majoring in a Group A subject must attain a level of competence 
equivalent to completion of a third-year college course in a foreign language. Those 
majoring in a Group B or C subject, who wish to continue a foreign language 
started in high school, must attain third-year level of competence; if the student 
begins a new foreign language in his freshman year, however, he is required to 
attain a second-year level of competence. Students wishing to continue study of a 
foreign language started in high school must take the qualifying examinations 
offered during Freshman Week. 

Third and Fourth Years 

Twenty courses are required of at least three semester hours each, 
including four in Group A and four in Group B. At least fourteen 
of the twenty courses must be advanced (numbered 300 or higher). 
Not less than six nor more than ten of the third- and fourth-year 



56 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

courses and not more than twelve of the total courses offered in ful- 
fillment of the requirements for the degree may fall within a stu- 
dent's major field. 

At the discretion of his major department, a student in R.O.T.C. 
may substitute military science or naval science courses for one of the 
requirements in each semester of the last two years, except that sub- 
stitution may not be made in the same elective group both years. For 
example, a student is not permitted to substitue military science or 
naval science for all Group A electives. 

Fifth Year in Accounting 

The fifth year of the professional accounting program is open to 
all Rice students, including those who major in fields other than eco- 
nomics and business administration, who take the prerequisite under- 
graduate accounting courses and are seeking intensive preparation for 
careers in or related to professional accounting. 

In the fifth year, ten semester-courses are required: six in account- 
ing, two in economics, and Political Science 310a and b (Law and 
Society), if not previously taken. The accounting courses cover man- 
agerial accounting, auditing, federal taxes, quantitative methods, and 
accounting theory. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science in 
Accounting. 

Students planning to enter this program should consult the Depart- 
ment of Economics and Business Administration for further informa- 
tion, including details on the prerequisite undergraduate accounting 
courses. 



Science-Engineering Division 

Science and Mathematics 

Students majoring in science register in the basic science-engineer- 
ing curriculum specified below in the first two years. Before selecting 
electives in the Sophomore year, the student should seek advice from 
the chairman of the department of his intended major. 

In the Junior and Senior years specific requirements in the major 
field and in related subjects are determined in consultation with an 
appointed adviser in the appropriate department. The student's regis- 
tration in each of these years must be approved by his adviser. 

First Year 

(1) Mathematics 100a, b. Analysis or Mathematics 220a, b. Advanced 
Analysis 

(2) Physics 100a. Mechanics, and Physics 100b. Introductory Rela- 
tivity and Beginning Electricity and Magnesium. 

(3) Chemistry 120a. b. Introductory and Analytical Chemistry 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 57 

(4) History 100a, b. Europe since 1500 or History 110a. b. American 
History 

(5) English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading, Thinking 
and Writing 

(6) Basic Health and Physical Education 

(7) R.O.T.C, if elected 

Second Year 

(1) Advanced Analysis 

(2) Second Year Physics 

(3) Group A elective 

(4) Foreign Language, or elective* 

(5) Elective* 

(6) R.O.T.C, if elected 

• Before registering for second year courses each student should consult with an 
advisor in his proposed major department concerning appropriate electives and 
foreign language. Each student is required to attain a level of competence equiva- 
lent to completion of a second year college course in a foreign language. Students 
wishing to continue study of a foreign language started in high school must take 
the qualifying examinations offered during Freshman Week. Students who qualify 
for a second year course on the basis of this examination may postpone History 
until the second year in order to continue study of the language without interrup- 
tion. 

Third and Fourth Years 

Science majors are available in biochemistry, biology, chemical 
physics, chemistry, geology, mathematics, and physics. A major in 
biology, geology, or mathematics may also be taken in the academic 
division. 

Twenty courses (or equivalent) are required of at least three semes- 
ter hours, including at least eight in the major field of study, four in 
Group C outside the major field, and of the remaining courses, four 
must be chosen from Group A or B. Fourteen of these twenty courses 
must be advanced (numbered 300 or higher). Not more than twelve 
of the total courses in fulfillment of the requirements for the Bache- 
lor of Arts degree may fall within the major field. 

At the discretion of his major department, a student in R.O.T.C. 
may substitute military science or naval science courses for one of the 
requirements in each semester of the last two years. 

Engineering 

During the first two years students with an interest in engineering 
register in the basic science-engineering curriculum. They should con- 
sult with the chairman of the department of interest or the Dean of 
Engineering and Science for information and advice about details of 
the program and choice of electives, and about engineering as a 
profession. In each of the third and fourth years every student's regis- 
tration must be approved by an adviser in his major department. 



58 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

On completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of the 
fourth year the student is expected to have a firm foundation in 
basic engineering principles and fundamental sciences and a broad 
understanding of the humanities. All students desiring admission to 
fifth-year studies leading to the professional master's degree must 
apply to the Committee on Professional Master's Degrees. Students 
transferring from other institutions or from other courses of study 
within the University who have not completed work equivalent to 
the first four years of the Rice University engineering curriculum 
must also submit transcripts of all previous work with their applica- 
tion for admission. Acceptance or rejection is determined after con- 
sideration of past academic performance and the recommendation of 
the department concerned. 

First Year 

(1) Mathematics 100a, b. Analysis or Mathematics 220a, b. Advanced 
Analysis 

(2) Physics 100a. Mechanics, and Physics 100b. Introductory Rela- 
tivity and Elementary Electricity and Magnetism. 

(3) Chemistry 120a, b. Introductoi-y and Analytical Chemistry 

(4) History 100a, b. Europe since 1500 or History 110a, b. American 
History 

(5) English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading, Thinking 
and Writing 

(6) Basic Health and Physical Education 

(7) R.O.T.C, if elected 

Second Year 

(1) Mathematics 200a, b., 210a, b., or 220a, b. Advanced Analysis 

(2) Physics 210a., or Physics 200a. Electricity and Magnetism, and 
Elective* 

(3) Elective* 

(4) Elective A or B 

(5) Foreign language or elective** 

(6) R.O.T.C, if elected 

* Departmental recommendations: Civil and Mechanical Engineering (Engr. 200b, 
Engr. 211a, Engr. 212b, Engr. 240a, Engr. 241b); Chemical Engineering (Engr. 211a, 
Engr. 212b., Engr. 240a, Engr. 241b, Phys. 210b); Electrical Engineering (Engr. 
200b, Engr. 240a, Engr. 241b, Phys. 210b) 

** Each student is required to attain a level of competence equivalent to comple- 
tion of a second year course in a foreign language, or of first year competence in two 
foreign languages. Students wishing to continue study of a foreign language started 
in high school must take the qualifying examinations offered during Freshman Week. 
Students who qualify for a second year course on the basis of this examination may 
postpone History until the second year in order to continue study of the language 
without interruption. 

Third and Fourth Years 

Twenty courses are required, each of at least three semester hours, 
for the completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree, fourteen to be in 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 59 

Group C and four chosen from Groups A or B. The others are unde- 
signated. At least fourteen courses must be advanced ( numbered 300 
or higher). 

At the discretion of his major department, a student in R.O.T.C. 
may substitute military science or naval science courses for one of the 
requirements in each semester of the last two years. 

School of Architecture 

Successful completion of the first four years of the curriculum qual- 
ifies the candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the requirements of the fifth year, the degree of Bache- 
lor of Architecture is awarded by the University. 

First Year 

(1) Architecture 101a, 102b. Principles of Architecture 

(2) Mathematics 100a, b. Elementary Analysis or Mathematics 101a, 
b. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 

(3) Physics 101a, b. Introductory Survey of Physics or Physics 100a. 
Mechanics and 100b. Introductory Relativity and Electricity and 
Magnetism* 

(4) English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading, Thinking 
and Writing 

(5) History 100a, b. Europe since 1500 or History 110a, b, American 
History* 

(6) Basic Health and Physical Education 

(7) R.O.T.C, if elected. 

Second Year 

(1) Principles of Architecture II 

(2) Ancient Art 

(3) Drawing I 

(4) Elective, not in Art or History of Art** 

(5) Foreign Language* 

(6) R.O.T.C, if elected 

•Students wishing to continue the study of a foreign language started in high 
school must take the qualifying examinations offered during Freshman Week. Such 
students who qualify for a second year course may postpone either Physics or History 
until the second year in order to continue study of the foreign language without 
interruption. 

All students are required to attain a level of competence equivalent to passing 
a second year college course in a foreign language. 

Third Year 

(1) Principles of Architecture III 

(2) Drawing II 

(3) Elective 

(4) Foreign languages or elective in Group A, B, or C** 

(5) R.O.T.C, if elected** 



60 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Fourth Year 

(1) Principles of Architecture IV 

(2) Sculpture I 

(3) Medieval Art 

(4) Elective in Group A, B, or C** 

(5) R.O.T.C, if elected** 

•* At least two semester-courses of electives chosen must be in Group B. R.O.T.C. 
may be chosen for one of the electives in the third or fourth year. 

Fifth Year 

(1) Principles of Architecture V 

(2) Renaissance and Baroque Art 

(3) Elective in Group A, B, or C 

Program in Commerce 
With the approval of the department chairman appropriate courses 
in the science-engineering and academic curricula may be substituted 
for required commerce courses. Fourteen of the twenty courses of the 
last two years must be numbered 300 or higher. Not less than six nor 
more than twelve of the total courses offered in fulfillment of the 
degree requirements may be in commerce. With the approval of the 
department chairman, students in R.O.T.C. may substitute military 
science or naval science courses for one of the requirements each 
year, but two substitutions may not be made in the same subject or 
group, as, for instance, the foreign language or Group B. 

First Year 

(1) Commerce 110a, b. Business Mathematics, Mathematics, 100a, b. 
Elementary Analysis, or Mathematics 101a, b. Fundamental 
Concepts of Mathematics 

(2) History II Oa, b. American History 

(3) English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading, Thinking 
and Writing 

(4) Foreign language* 

(5) Science elective 

(6) Basic Health and Physical Education 

Second Year 

(1) Commerce 2I0a, b. Introduction to Business 

(2) Group A elective 

(3) Foreign language* 

(4) Group B elective 

(5) Laboratory science or mathematics elective 

• Each student is required to attain a level of competence equivalent to comple- 
tion of a second year college course in a foreign language. Students wishing to con- 
tinue study of a foreign language started in high school must take the qualifying 
examinations offered during Freshman Week. 



CURRICULA AND DEGREES 61 

Third Year 

(1) Commerce 300a, b. Financial Control 

(2) Commerce 310b. Business Statistics; Commerce 315a. Finance 
and Banking 

(3) Group A elective 

(4) Group B elective 

(5) Free elective 

Fourth Year 

(1) Commerce 410a. Marketing; Commerce 415b. Business Finance 

(2) Commerce 420a. Business Organization I; Commerce 425b. 
Business Organization II 

(3) Law and Society 

(4) Group A elective 

(5) Free elective 

Program in Health and Physical Education 

First Year 

(1) History 110a, b. American History 

(2) English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing 

(3) Foreign language* 

(4) Mathematics 

(5) Science 

(6) H.&P.E. 103-4. Basic Health and Physical Education 

Second Year 

(1) Science or Mathematics (Biology 100 required) 

(2) Group A elective 

(3) Group B elective 

(4) Foreign language or Elective* 

(5) H.&P.E. 100a. Foundations of Physical Education and H.&P.E. 
110b. Foundations of Health Education 

(6) H.&P.E. 225a-226b. Laboratory 

* Each student is required to attain a level of competence equivalent to com- 
pletion of a second year college course in a foreign language. Students wishing to 
continue study of a foreign language started in high school must take the qualifying 
examinations offered during Freshman Week. 

Third Year 

(1) H.&P.E. 200a. Principles and Philosophy of Physical Education 
in the United States and H.&P.E. 210b. Intramural Sports, 
School-Community Recreation Programs, and Safety Education 

(2) H.&P.E. 300a. Kinesiology and H.&P.E. 310b. Methods, Ma- 
terials, and Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and 
Interscholastic Athletics, Grades 7-12 



62 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

(3) Political Science 

(4) Elective 

(5) Elective 

(6) H.&P.E. 325a.-326b. Laboratory 

Fourth Year 

(1) H.&P.E. 320a. Tests and Measurements and Adaptive Physical 
Education and H.&P.E. 321b. Physiology of Muscular Activity 

(2) H.&P.E. 400a. Organization and Administration of Health and 
Physical Education, Grades 7-12, and H.&P.E. 410b. Methods, 
Materials, and Curriculum Construction in Health Education, 
Grades 7-12 

(3) Elective 

(4) Elective 

(5) Elective 

(6) H.&P.E. 425a.-426b. Laboratory 

Students planning to enter educational work should consult the 
teacher-training adviser of the department. Certification in Texas at 
the secondary level may be obtained by certain required courses in 
Education and the student's chosen teaching field in the third and 
fourth years. 



Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps Programs 

Rice University offers two Reserve Officers* Training Corps pro- 
grams-the Army and the Navy. The mission of these programs is to 
train college students so that they may qualify upon graduation as 
commissioned officers in a component of the United States Army or 
Navy. Upon successful completion of one of the R.O.T.C. programs 
and graduation with a baccalaureate degree, the student may be 
given a commission in the appropriate service. The Navy has two cat- 
egories of midshipmen, one working toward a reserve commission 
and the other toward a regular commission. The Army normally 
awards reserve commissions; however, certain selected distinguished 
military students may be offered commissions in the Regular Army. 

Any student suspended by the University for academic failure or 
other cause is immediately disenrolled from the R.O.T.C. programs. 
Any student performing unsatisfactory work in military or naval sci- 
ence courses, or possessing unsatisfactory officerlike qualities may be 
disenrolled from R.O.T.C. programs regardless of the quality of his 
academic work. Enrollment in the R.O.T.C. programs at Rice Uni- 
versity is made at the beginning of the fall term only. 



Military Science 

The Department of Military Science was established in the fall of 
1951. A U. S. Army officer, designated the Professor of Military Sci- 
ence, with assistance of officers and men of the U. S. Army, adminis- 
ters the program. Training in military leadership is emphasized, with 
instruction being given in subjects common to all branches of the 
Army. The Army R.O.T.C. course consists of two main subdivisions: 
(1) Basic and (2) Advanced. Students electing the Army R.O.T.C. 
program first elect the Basic Course, which may be completed by ei- 
ther of two methods: on campus during the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years or off campus at a six-week summer camp between the 
Sophomore and Junior years. Upon completion of the Basic Course 
by either of these methods, the student, if recommended for further 
training, may elect the Advanced Course. All on-campus courses 
include one hour of drill per week. 

In the on-campus Basic Course, Freshmen attend class one hour 
per week and Sophomores two hours per week. 

63 



64 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

The Advanced Course includes three classroom hours per week 
during the Junior and Senior years in management and command 
responsibilities and a six-week summer camp, normally between the 
Junior and Senior years, in practical military instruction. 

A flight training program including thirty-five hours of ground in- 
struction and thirty-six hours of flight instruction is available to 
physically qualified Army R.O.T.C. students during the second year 
of their Advanced Course. All textbooks, flight clothing, and equip- 
ment required for the program are provided at no cost to the stu- 
dent. 

Four-year Army R.O.T.C. scholarships are available for award on a 
nationwide competitive basis to students who plan to take the Basic 
Course on campus, and two-year scholarships are available to Ad- 
vanced Course students who have completed the Basic Course on 
campus. 

Each scholarship student receives retainer pay of $50.00 per month 
with all tuition fees, books, and equipment paid for by the Army for 
the period of his scholarship. Nonscholarship students receive $40.00 
per month during the two years of the Advanced Course. 

Graduates of this program are commissioned in the various 
branches of the Army based upon the preference of the individual, 
his academic major, and his demonstrated leadership and technical 
qualification. 

Naval Science 

The Department of Naval Science at Rice University was es- 
tablished in the fall of 1941 and is an integral part of the organiza- 
tion of the University. It is administered by a senior U. S. naval 
officer who is the Professor of Naval Science. He is assisted by officers 
and men of the U. S. Navy and Marine Corps. The purpose of the 
Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps is to train highly select young 
men for either naval service as commissioned officers of the Regular 
Navy and Marine Corps (Regular Program) or as reserve officers. 

Students taking five-year courses are considered eligible for enroll- 
ment at the beginning of their first or second year. In view of the 
heavy academic loads for fifth-year engineering students and schedul- 
ing difficulties, all students are encouraged to enroll in the regular 
manner during Freshman matriculation. 

There are two categories of N.R.O.T.C. students: (1) Regular; (2) 
Contract. 

Regular Students. A regular N.R.O.T.C. student is appointed a 
Midshipman, U. S. Naval Reserve, on a nationwide competitive basis 
and receives retainer pay at the rate of $50.00 per month for a max- 
imum of four years, with all tuition, fees, books, and equipment paid 
for by the government. Required uniforms are furnished. He is re- 



RESERVE officers' TRAINING CORPS PROGRAMS 65 

quired to complete twenty-four semester hours for naval science sub- 
jects (one course per term, including those courses taught by the ci- 
vilian faculty which are a part of the Navy curricula) and other 
training prescribed during the summer months, and upon graduation 
with a baccalaureate degree to accept a commission as Ensign in the 
U. S. Navy or Second Lieutenant in the U. S. Marine Corps. 

Contract Students. Contract students are civilian college students 
who enter into a mutual contract with the Secretary of the Navy in 
which they obligate themselves to take naval science courses and 
drills and one summer training cruise. They must also agree to enlist 
in the Naval or Marine Reserve prior to starting the third year of 
Naval Science. Enlisted time during Junior and Senior years does not 
count in computing length of service. Should the student be dropped 
from the program through no fault of his own, he will be discharged 
from the Naval Reserve if he so desires. In return, the Navy provides 
the required uniforms, pays retainer pay at the rate of not less than 
150.00 per month during the Junior and Senior years, and offers a 
reserve commission in the Navy or Marine Corps upon graduation. 

Contract students are not selected by the competitive procedure in- 
dicated above for Regular students; rather they are selected by the 
Commanding Officer (Professor of Naval Science) from among those 
students who apply who are either selected for admission by Rice 
University or who are already in attendance. 

U. S. Marine Corps. N.R.O.T.C. students, either Regular or Con- 
tract, may apply for transfer to the Marine Corps program during 
the Sophomore year. Such selectees are referred to as Marine Corps 
option students and attend separate classes under a Marine officer in- 
structor during their Junior and Senior years. 

The N.R.O.T.C. course of training consists of courses of instruc- 
tion, laboratory periods, and drill, together with such training duty 
or training cruises as may be prescribed. One of several appropriate 
courses offered by the Department of Psychology is substituted for 
one semester of Naval Service. 

The Navy prescribes certain course requirements for N.R.O.T.C. 
students as follows: 

1. By the end of the Sophomore year each Regular student must 
have satisfactorily completed one year each of college physics 
and mathematics. 

2. Every student must achieve proficiency in written and oral ex- 
pression. 

Rice University will prescribe standards of proficiency and deter- 
mine procedures necessary to achieve them. 



Academic Regulations 

All students seeking a bachelor's degree are subject to the academic 
regulations of the faculty. The Committee on Examinations and 
Standins: administers the rules described below. Under unusual cir- 
cumstances any student may submit a written petition to the commit- 
tee requesting special consideration. 

Registration 

All currently enrolled students register in May for the following 
academic year except for payment of fees. A student who does not 
file a course list, or request a delay by the deadline established by the 
Registrar will be considered withdrawn from the University by de- 
fault. To be readmitted for the following fall term he must pay a 
$25 reinstatement fee. Entering students are sent preliminary registra- 
tion materials during the summer, but course registration is com- 
pleted during Freshman Week. All tuition and fees must be paid by 
August 26, except where a special tuition plan has been elected. 

The course registration card of each student must be approved and 
signed by an adviser. Registrations of Freshman and Sophomore stu- 
dents are approved by faculty advisers appointed in the colleges; oth- 
ers are approved by an adviser appointed by the chairman of the 
department of the student's major field of study. 

No student can be registered in or allowed to enter any course or 
section later than two weeks after the date of opening of courses as 
given in the Academic Calendar (page v). A student who makes a 
change of course or section after the first week of classes of a term is 
charged a fee of $10.00 per course. This fee is not charged when a 
change in student's registration is a result of modification of the 
course offerings or class schedules of the University. 

Course Programs 

A student at Rice is normally expected to enroll in five courses 
each semester and thus, in eight semesters to have completed the 
forty courses required for graduation. During any four semesters, a 
student may request the approval of his advisor for dropping one 
course at any time up to the end of the tenth week of the semester 
and, thereby, reduce his course load to four for that semester. That 
course will be recorded as dropped on his transcript. Extension of 
the option to drop courses beyond these four semesters is possible in 

66 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 67 

unusual circumstances, e.g., poor health, by special permission of the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing. 

When using this option to drop courses, the student must recognize 
that he still has to take the course, or an accejjtable alternate to ful- 
fill the degree requirements, and thus, he should make definite plans 
to make up the credit either in summer school or in a subsequent 
semester. By dropping four courses and not making them up, a stu- 
dent will delay his graduation by at least one semester. 

A student failing to complete a first baccalaureate degree within 
four full years is permitted to register for only those courses actually 
needed for graduation, provided he is not on probation. His tuition 
will be determined as specified on page 77. 

Approval of Majors 

In the second semester of the Sophomore year, each student is re- 
quired to submit his choice of major to the Committee on Examina- 
tions and Standing. The committee's action is guided by (1) aptitude 
shown by the student's record during the first two years; (2) limita- 
tions of departmental capacities for receiving students in the various 
major programs. Until a student's major has been approved he can- 
not enter the Junior courses of that curriculum. 

Change of Curriculum 

Any proposed change of curriculum is subject to the approval of 
the Committee on Examinations and Standing. At its discretion, the 
committee may require any student to change his curriculum when 
his work is unsatisfactory. 

Examinations 

Written three-hour examinations are given in all undergraduate 
courses at the close of each semester. Late semester examinations are 
given only when an examination is missed because of illness or some 
other unavoidable circumstance, and only on approval of the Com- 
mittee on Examinations and Standing. 

Other tests are given from time to time at periods decided by the 
instructors. All tests and examinations are conducted under a student 
honor system (see p. 91). In determining grades, instructors consider 
both performance during the term and the record of examinations. 

Grade Symbols 

Grade symbols have the following meanings: I— Very high stand- 
ing; 2— High standing; 3— Satisfactory standing; 4— Poor standing; 
5— Failure. Many courses require two consecutive semesters for com- 



68 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

pletion. A student who fails the first semester of a two-semester se- 
quence will not be permitted to continue in the second semester, ex- 
cept with the written recommendation of the course instructor. 
Grades are recorded for the first semester in January and for the sec- 
ond semester in May. 

Grades of "Incomplete" are reported to the Registrar when a stu- 
dent does not complete a course because of illness or other circum- 
stances beyond the student's control. The course must be completed 
and a numerical grade reported by the end of the twelfth week of 
the next semester. Otherwise the grade is recorded as "5". 

President's Honor Roll 

Outstanding students are honored each semester through the publi- 
cation of the President's Honor Roll, which includes all students who 
have no grade less than 2 in any course, and also those students who 
have made no grade below 3 and have earned twice as many grades 
of 1 as of 3. This distinction is made a part of the student's perma- 
nent record. A student who carries a reduced schedule is not eligible 
for the President's Honor Roll. 

Probation 

A student who fails to do academic work of high quality is placed 
on probation by the Committee on Examinations and Standing if: 

(1) he does not earn passing grades in at least 75 per cent of his 
approved schedule in any semester. 

(2) he does not earn grades of 3 or higher in at least 50 per cent 
of his course program in any semester. 

The period of probation extends to the end of the next semester 
in which the student is enrolled in the University, A student is not 
placed on probation more than twice during his residence, but in- 
stead of a third probation is placed on academic suspension. 

A student who goes on probation at the end of the year in which 
he is a degree candidate but who is eligible to reregister may com- 
plete his degree requirements by earning grades, in a program of at 
least four additional courses, that remove him from probation. 

A student on probation, either academic or disciplinary, is not per- 
mitted to be a candidate for or to hold any elective or appointive 
office or honor, or to serve as editor, assistant editor, business man- 
ager, or assistant business manager of any University publication. 

Academic Suspension 

Any student whose academic standing is unsatisfactory may be sus- 
pended from the University. A student's standing is considered unsat- 
isfactory: 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 69 

(1) at any time he is failing in one-half or more of the work in 
which he is enrolled. This clause does not apply to an under- 
graduate student at the end of his first semester at the University. 

(2) when, after having been placed on probation twice he fails to 
maintain passing grades in at least 75 per cent and grades of 
3 or higher in at least 50 per cent of the semester hours in which 
he is enrolled. 

(3) if he fails to assume his responsibilities as a student as evidenced 
by excessive absence from classes or laboratory sessions or con- 
tinued failure to perform required assignments. 

A student who has been suspended may re-enter at the beginning 
of the next semester following one year's absence from the Univer- 
sity, unless the Committee on Examinations and Standing stipulates a 
different period of suspension. When a different period is under con- 
sideration, the committee will request reports and recommendations 
from the members of the faculty acquainted with the student and his 
work and the appropriate College Master. In some instances, suspen- 
sion may be permanent. 

Special Probation 

At its discretion, the Committee on Examinations and Standing 
may grant the privilege of special probation to an individual student 
who otherwise would not be permitted to continue at Rice Univer- 
sity in his desired program. Special probation requires that a student 
shall have no grade less than 3 during the period of his special pro- 
bation and, further, that he must remain off probation thereafter. 

Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission 

A student who withdraws voluntarily while not on probation will 
ordinarily be readmitted within three years. Any student desiring to 
withdraw voluntarily from the University must do so in person or by 
letter at the office of the Dean of Undergraduate Affairs to be eligible 
for readmission. If withdrawal occurs within five weeks of the begin- 
ning of any semester examination period, grades as of the date of 
withdrawal may be used to determine eligibility for readmission. 

Removal of Course Deficiencies 

Course deficiencies resulting from failing grades, changes in curric- 
ulum or an approved reduction of course schedule may be removed 
by satisfactory work in summer school. To obtain credit for summer 
school work, prior approval of the Committee on Examinations and 
Standing for specific courses must be obtained, and a transcript show- 
ing the student has satisfied all conditions stipulated by the commit- 
tee must be submitted. Credit is not given for more than four sum- 



70 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

mer school courses taken to remove deficiencies, nor is credit for fu- 
ture courses in a student's program granted for work done in summer 
school. 

Graduation 

To be recommended for any bachelor's degree, a student must 
have earned grades of 3 or better in at least 50 per cent of work 
prescribed for that degree, including grades of 3 or better in at least 
50 per cent of work undertaken in his major field after completion 
of the Sophomore year. He must not go on probation at the end of 
the year in which he is a degree candidate. 

Honors 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews each stu- 
dent's record at the time of graduation and recommends to the fac- 
ulty outstanding students to be granted degrees cum laude, magna 
cum laude, or summa cum laude. 



Admission of New Students 

In selecting members of the Freshman class from the large number 
of well-qualified candidates who apply for admission, Rice University 
undertakes to identify and to admit, irrespective of race or creed, 
those with exceptional ability and potential who appear best pre- 
pared to grow toward intellectual maturity. 

The criteria used in the prediction of such development are of 
three basic types: 1) scholastic record as reflected by courses chosen 
and the quality of performance; 2) scores made on the Scholastic Ap- 
titude and Achievement Tests administered by the College Entrance 
Examination Board; and 3) evaluations made by teachers, counselors, 
and interviewers. Scholastic performance provides a reasonable indica- 
tion of the applicant's study habits and self-discipline. College 
Entrance Examination Board scores furnish a credible basis to com- 
pare one individual with a very large number of other persons of 
similar background (when set to a specific scholastic assignment). In- 
terview reports and ratings obtained from high school teachers and 
counselors give some insight into extracurricular areas of develop- 
ment and such currently unmeasurable factors as motivation, intellec- 
tual curiosity, and emotional stability, which must also be considered. 

The experience of Rice University indicates that those most likely 
to succeed are the applicants who have, in addition to the obvious 
desirable personal traits, high scholastic standing and high College 
Entrance Examination Board scores. Not all students with superior 
scholastic standing and comparable College Entrance Examination 
Board scores become outstanding Rice students; however, nearly all 
well-adjusted, well-motivated students of high intellectual capacity 
and intellectual curiosity have good chances of success. 

Students are selected on a competitive basis in accordance with ad- 
mission quotas in the (1) Architecture, (2) Humanities and Social Sci- 
ences, and (8) Science-Engineering programs of the University. New 
students enter only in September of each year. 

1. The High School Record. The completion of not less than six- 
teen acceptable units is required. The record must include the fol- 
lowing units: 

English 4 Laboratory science 2 

Social studies 2 (Biology, chemistry. 

Algebra 2 physics, etc.) 

Plane geometry 1 Additional credits 

Trigonometry 1/2 in above-listed solid 

A foreign language 2 subjects 2i/^ 



Total 16 



71 



72 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Both physics and chemistry are required of applicants for the Sci- 
ence-Engineering Division. A course in high school chemistry is pre- 
requisite to the first-year course in chemistry. 

2. Entrance Examinations. The required entrance examinations are 
administered by the College Entrance Examination Board. Formal ar- 
rangement for applying to take the C.E.E.B. examinations, as well as 
for paying fees, is a matter between the applicant and the College 
Entrance Examination Board. The bulletins are available on the 
Rice campus, for those who find it convenient to call for them, and 
from hisfh school counselors. 

The following examinations are required according to the curricu- 
lum involved: 

Academic and Architecture Science-Engineering 

(1) Scholastic Aptitude Test (1) Scholastic Aptitude Test 

(2) Three Achievement Tests (2) Three Achievement Tests 
as follows: as follows: 

(a) English composition (a) English composition 

(b) Any two of the (b) Mathematics 
following: (Level I or Level II) 
A foreign language (c) Chemistry or physics 
American History and 

Social Studies 
European History and 

World Affairs 
Mathematics 
A science 

(3) For Architecture candidates only: Architectural School Aptitude 
Test 

A list of the courses of study and majors offered may be found on 
pages 53-62. 

3. Personal Interviews. Interviews are an integral part of the admis- 
sion procedure. They enable the Admissions Committee to reach a 
decision based on nonacademic, as well as academic, aspects of the 
candidate's development. The candidate should arrange for an inter- 
view before the closing date for applications. Campus interviews will 
be held at 109 Lovett Hall between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, and until 11:30 on Saturday mornings. 
(Summer schedule: Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) 
Applicants who cannot visit the University or who are unable to 
meet with a traveling member of the Admissions Committee may be 
interviewed by alumni interviewers located throughout the United 
States and in several foreign countries. If an applicant cannot be inter- 
viewed by one of these methods, the interview will be waived with- 
out prejudice. 

4. Evaluations from High School Counselors and Teachers. Confi- 



ADMISSION OF NEW STUDENTS 73 

dential rating sheets submitted by the applicant's high school teachers 
and counselors are considered in connection with every application. 

Early Decision Plan 

The Early Decision Plan is designed for prospective candidates for 
admission who regard Rice University as their first choice and will 
await the outcome of the application to Rice before applying else- 
where. Early Decision applications will be available July 1 after the 
junior year in high school and must be filed by October 10 of the 
senior year. Therefore, the required College Entrance Examination 
Board tests must be taken no later than July following the junior 
year. The personal interview requirement may be satisfied at any 
time prior to the October 10 deadline. Early Decision applicants will 
be notified of the Admissions Committee's decisions by November 15. 

Action on some candidates may be deferred until the Regular De- 
cision period in April if the Admissions Committee does not have 
adequate grounds for an affirmative decision in November. An addi- 
tional semester of the high school record and additional C.E.E.B. 
scores from the December and January tests may be added for consid- 
eration in the spring. The applicant would, of course, be released 
from his pledge to apply only to Rice. 

Requirements for admission are not altered if a student applies for 
an early decision. Those accepted early will be expected to complete 
the remainder of their high school work with the same superior per- 
formance. 

A non-refundable deposit of $100 is required by December 1 if ad- 
mission is granted in November. An additional deposit of $50 must 
be made before March 1 by one who wishes to reserve a room in one 
of the residential colleges. These deposits are not covered by any 
financial aid that Rice offers. 

An Early Decision candidate who wishes to apply for financial as- 
sistance must file the Parents' Confidential Statement by October 1. 
Offers of financial assistance and notices of admission are sent simul- 
taneously in November. (For further details see page 74.) 

Regular Decision Plan 

The Regular Decision Plan is designed primarily for candidates 
who did not take C.E.E.B. examinations during the junior year or 
those who have more than one college under consideration. The Reg- 
ular Decision candidate may wait as late as December or January to 
complete his C.E.E.B. tests and to file applications for admission and 
financial aid. Interviews should be completed by February. 

Regular Decision candidates are notified of the Admissions Com- 
mittee's decisions during the first week of April. The candidates who 
are offered admission must respond with a $50 registration deposit by 



74 



WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



May 1 to reserve their place in the incoming class. Those who wish 
to reserve a room on campus must make an additional $50 deposit 
when notified of room assignments. 

Admissions Schedule 
(Early Decision and Regular Decision) 

Early Decision Regular Decision 



C.E.E.B. Examinations 


J^iy 


January 


Deadline 






\. 


*Application Forms Available 


July 1 


October 15 


Filing Deadline 




October 10 


February 1 


Financial Aid: 








PCS Available 




September 1 


September 1 


Filing Deadline 




October 1 


February 1 


Interview Deadline 




October 10 


February 1 


Notification Date 




November 15 


Early April 


Candidates Reply Date 


December 1 


May 1 


(with registration 


deposit) 






**Room Deposit 




March 1 


When Notified 



• No application fee is required of candidates for admission to Rice. 
•• Room application forms and detailed information concerning residence in 
the colleges will be sent when admission is granted. 



Financial Assistance Available to New Students 

Rice University recognizes its continuing responsibility to provide 
the highest quality instruction for a limited number of exceptional 
students. To this end the University provides a program of financial 
assistance based on the applicant's need in order that no qualified 
student will be denied admission because of an inability to pay tu- 
ition. The program combines the use of grants with loan funds in an 
attempt to provide students with sufficient aid to meet educational 
expenses beyond the resources of the student and his parents. 

It must be realized, however, that financing higher education is 
primarily the responsibility of the student and parent and, since 
available University grants and loan funds are limited, each appli- 
cant is urged to take advantage of any opportunity to seek other 
scholarship aid. 

Regular decision applicants for financial aid must file the Parents' 
Confidential Statement with the College Scholarship Service before 
February 1. 

The Parents' Confidential Statement forms for regular decision 
may be obtained from high school counselors or directly from the 
College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 



ADMISSION OF NEW STUDENTS 75 

Candidates applying for admission under the Early Decision Plan 
must obtain the Parents' Confidential Statement forms from the Of- 
fice of Admissions or the Financial Aid Office at Rice and must file 
them with the College Scholarship Service by October 1. Parents' 
Confidential Statement forms used by Early Decision Candidates 
must be those applicable to the academic year for which admission is 
being sought. If a prior year form is used it must be returned, thus 
causing a delay in notification. 

Requests for additional information about financial assistance 
should be addressed to the Financial Aid Officer, Rice University, 
Houston, Texas 77001. The Parents' Confidential Statement consti- 
tutes an application for financial assistance. When Rice University 
receives it from the College Scholarship Service, the applicant is then 
considered for all appropriate grants or scholarships administered by 
the University. No other application is needed. 

Notifications of offers of financial aid accompany notices of admis- 
sion to Rice. Financial aid grants or scholarships made on an annual 
basis are payable one-half eacli semester. 

Advanced Placement 

Entering freshman who have done work well beyond the usual 
high school courses in certain subjects and who make superior scores 
on the Advanced Placement examinations offered by the Educational 
Testing Service will be given recognition for their achievements. De- 
giee credit and advanced standing may be given in the following sub- 
ject-matter fields: biology, English, French, German, history, physics, 
and Spanish. Students who make superior scores on the examination 
in chemistry may earn degree credit in chemistry by completing cer- 
tain required laboratory work in quantitative analysis during their 
Freshman year. 

Departmental placement examinations in mathematics and foreign 
languages are given on the campus in the fall. A satisfactory grade 
permits the student to enroll in Mathematics 220 but does not give 
him credit for Mathematics 100. Grades in the foreign language ex- 
aminations are used to determine the student's placement in a lan- 
guage which he has studied in high school and wishes to continue. 

Transfer Students 

Admission to Rice is possible for students with superior records at 
another college. In order to be considered for admission as a transfer 
student, the applicant must have completed a minimum of ten semes- 
ter-length courses which are applicable to the degree he will seek at 
Rice. All new students enroll only in September of each year. A mini- 
mum of two years in residence is required for a Rice degree. 

A candidate should file the Preliminary Application between Feb- 



76 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

ruary 1 and April 1. When requesting the proper forms, the appli- 
cant should indicate clearly the number of years he will have com- 
pleted in his present college by the following September. If the trans- 
fer applicant has never taken C.E.E.B. tests, he should take the Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test in December, January, or March. 

Transfer applicants seeking financial assistance should file the Par- 
ents' Confidential Statement with the College Scholarship Service. 

Decisions regarding transfer applications are usually made during 
May. 

For further information or application forms, prospective candi- 
dates for admission as undergraduates should communicate with the 
Director of Admissions. When requesting application forms, the can- 
didate should clearly indicate whether he is a prospective high school 
graduate or a prospective transfer from another college. 

Student Housing 

A prospective student should indicate on his application for admis- 
sion whether or not, if admitted as a student, he desires to reside on 
the campus. Detailed information about residence in the colleges and 
room application forms will accompany the notice of admission sent 
to each new undergraduate. To reserve rooms it is essential that ap- 
plications be submitted as directed. New undergraduate women stu- 
dents who do not live with their families in metropolitan Houston 
are required to live in one of the women's colleges. 

Correspondence from new students regarding housing in the resi- 
dential colleges should be addressed to the Office of Admissions. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 

The tuition and fees charged to undergraduate students who en- 
tered in September, 1967 are as set forth below. These charges are 
subject to change from time to time as the operating expenses of the 
University increase. It is not anticipated, however, that any major 
change will be required for 1968-69. 

Tuition 

The tuition for all undergraduate students who entered Rice Uni- 
versity in September, 1967, is $1,500 per year, payable $750 at the 
beginning of each semester, 

A student who has not completed the requirements for his bache- 
lor's degree after four full years of study (or after five years if a can- 
didate for a five-year bachelor's degree) will be charged full tuition 
unless a reduced tuition rate has been specifically approved for him 
as the result of a petition submitted to the Committee on Financial 
Aid. The reduced rate is $60.00 per semester hour in which the stu- 
dent is registered, up to but not exceeding the full tuition charge of 
$750 each semester. 

An undergraduate who withdraws from the University and returns 
at a later date will be charged the same tuition as is being paid by 
the members of the class he enters upon his return. 

Fees 

Students who entered in 1967 were charged the following annual 
fees. These fees are paid at the beginning of the term in the fall. 

Subsidies to students' activities $11.50 

Tickets to athletic events 4.00 

College fee 15.00 

Health Service 12.00 

Total fees charged to new undergraduate 

students $42.50 

In addition, each student paid a laboratory fee of $10.00 per semes- 
ter for each of the laboratory courses in which he registered. 

Special Charges 

Freshman Week $20.00 

Late Registration 15.00 

Late Change of Registration, each course 10.00 

Diploma 6.00 

Army R.O.T.C 10.00 

77 



78 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Guaranty Bond 

Every undergraduate student regardless of age is required to pro- 
vide a $300.00 guaranty signed by himself and a parent, guardian, or 
other responsible adult, excluding a spouse or another student. 

Refund of Tuition 

If a student withdraws from the University before the beginning of 
the second week of classes, 90 per cent of the tuition paid will be 
reduced by 10 per cent of the total tuition charge each week that the 
student remains enrolled. There is no refund of fees or special 
charges after a student once attends classes. 

Student Teaching Internship Fees 

Regular students who have just completed a bachelor's degree and 
go immediately into the summer program and internship will be re- 
quired to pay only the present course fee of $62.50 each summer or 
term of internship until the summer of 1969. After that such students 
will be charged tuition at a rate to be determined in relation to the 
costs of the summer program. 

Former students admitted for the purpose of completing teacher 
certification will pay the |50 registration fee in addition to the 
course fee of $62.50 each summer until the summer of 1969, after 
which they will pay the established tuition rate and registration fee. 

Delinquent Accounts 

No student in arrears in any financial obligation to Rice Univer- 
sity as of the date announced for the completion of registration for 
any semester will be registered. No certificate of attendance, diploma 
or transcript of credit will be issued at any time for a student whose 
account is in arrears. 

Students who have not made satisfactory arrangements with the 
Cashier for payment of current charges, and those living on campus 
who have not executed a satisfactory room contract, by the end of 
the second week of classes in any semester may be dropped from the 
rolls of the University. 

Transcripts 

Transcripts are issued on requests made to the Office of the Regis- 
trar. No transcript is issued without consent of the individual whose 
record is concerned. Each student is entitled to two free transcripts. 
There is a charge of $1.00 for each additional copy, payable in ad- 



TUITION, FEES, AND EXPENSES 79 

vance. Those requesting transcripts by mail should include payment 
with the request. 



Living Expenses 



Residence fees to cover costs of dining halls, operation of resi- 
dences, and the Health Service are established from year to year as 
requirements dictate. For 1967-68 the yearly fee for residence in the 
men's colleges was $1,029, in the women's college $1,112. This charge 
provides for room and three meals per day excluding the evening 
meals on Saturdays and Sundays. Meals are not served during the 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, mid-term, and Easter recesses. The women's 
colleges are closed to all residents during the two-week Christmas re- 
cess. When securing room assignments for the academic year to fol- 
low each student is required to make a room deposit of $50. To as- 
sure reservation of space current students must make room deposits 
by the date established in the various colleges, but no later than 
April 1. New students are required to make a similar deposit upon 
notification of room assignments during the summer. These deposits 
are returnable only upon individual application and for good and 
sufficient cause. The balance of the residence fee is payable in two 
approximately equal installments. The exact amounts and due dates 
are stated in the Residential College Agreement which each resident 
is required to sign. 

All items included, the young man or woman entering Rice Uni- 
versity in September, 1968, who will live on campus will need to 
have available about $3,350 for the first year. For a student living at 
home the cost will be about $2,600. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 

Undergraduate Scholarships and Grants 

To encourage students in devotion to learning and in striving to 
develop creative capacity in productive scholarship many friends of 
Rice University have established undergraduate scholarships and 
grants-in-aid. These are reserved principally for students who have 
been in residence at least one year, although a few are designated for 
entering Freshmen with exceptional records. Honorary scholarships 
without stipend are also awarded to students who have demonstrated 
outstanding ability and promise of future development. 

The Board of Governors has established a program of tuition 
grants extensive enough to assure that no student will be denied ad- 
mission because of inability to pay tuition. The total amount of 
these grants is the equivalent of 175 four-year, full-tuition awards 
and 75 four-year, partial-tuition awards. In addition, a number of Ar- 
thur B. Cohn Prize Scholarships are awarded to entering Freshmen 
with excpetional records, without regard to financial need of the re- 
cipients. 

John McKnitt Alexander Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution Scholarship. An endowed undergraduate scholarship for 
a young woman student of Rice University. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers, South Texas Section. Pro- 
vides a scholarship for a student of chemical engineering who is a 
resident of the area served by the Section. 

Amyx Memorial Scholarship. Established in 1964 by the Gulf Coast 
Section, Society of Petroleum Engineers of the American Institute 
of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Inc., as a me- 
morial to James W. Amyx. Awarded annually to a Sophomore in 
an engineering program related to the mineral industry. 

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation Scholarships. 
Established by the Houston chapter in 1965 to assist students of 
science and technology who excel in these fields and who need 
monetary assistance to pursue their educations. 

Samuel S. Asche Scholarship. Awarded annually to the student hav- 
ing highest standing at the end of the Freshman year. 

Associated General Contractors of America Scholarships. Established 
by the Houston chapter in 1965 to assist students in civil engineer- 

80 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 81 

ing and awarded on the basis of scholarship and promise for future 
professional achievement. 

Max Autrey Memorial Scholarships. Established under the will of the 
late Mrs. Nettie S. Autrey in memory of her son. First awarded in 
1942, they are open annually to all current students. 

Axson Club's Axson Wilson Scholarship. Established in 1922 in 
memory of Mrs. Woodrow Wilson for a young woman student of 
Junior or Senior standing. 

Axson Club Katie B. Howard Scholarship. For young women of 
Junior or Senior standing, in memory of Mrs. A. R. Howard; has 
been awarded annually since 1937. 

Graham Baker Studentship. The first undergraduate scholarship es- 
tablished at the Rice Institute. It is awarded annually to the stu- 
dent in the three lower classes earning the highest scholastic stand- 
ing for the academic year. 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Distinguished Scholarship. Es- 
tablished by the will of James A. Baker in 1941 to encourage and 
assist needy and worthy students. 

R. C. Baker Foundation Scholarships. Four scholarships in mechani- 
cal engineering honoring the founder of Baker Oil Tools, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Val T. Billups Scholarship. Established by the named 
donors in 1953 for students of engineering above Freshman stand- 
ing. 

Borden Freshman Prize. Given to the student having the highest 
grades for all work of the Freshman year. 

Brochstein Foundation Scholarships. Established in 1965 to assist and 
encourage worthy undergraduate students. 

Brown College Scholarship. Made available by the Margarett Root 
Brown College Cabinet for a member of the college who has main- 
tained high academic standing and has contributed significantly to 
the college life. 

Clyde and Ethel Butcher Scholarship. Established by the named do- 
nors in 1967 to assist needy and worthy students. 

Chapman-Bryan Memorial Scholarship. Created in 1937 by the be- 
quest of Miss Johnelle Bryan on behalf of her sister, Mrs. Bryan 
Chapman, and the donor. 

The Arthur B. Coh?i Prize Scholarships. Established in 1967 to honor 
Mr. Cohn who served for many years as Assistant Secretary to the 
Board of Trustees. These scholarships are awarded on a merit 
basis, without regard for financial need, to very exceptional stu- 
dents of the entering Freshman class. 



82 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

College Bowl Chaynpions Scholarship. Established from funds awarded 
for successful competition in the College Bowl in 1966. 

College Women's Club Scholarship. Established in 1942 to provide a 
scholarship to assist a young lady in her first year of graduate 
study. The scholarship is awarded annually to a graduating Senior. 

Continental Air Lines Foundation Scholarship. Established in 1964 
to assist and encourage a worthy undergraduate student. 

Continental Oil Compajiy Scholarship. Awarded to a student with 
high standing in chemical engineering. 

Millie Tutt Cook Scholarship. For the benefit of a Junior or Senior 
student preparing for a career in teaching. 

Thomas A. and Pauline M. Dickson Scholarships. Established in 1932 
to assist young men and women students who are largely self-sup- 
porting. 

E.B.L.S.-E.B.L.S. Alumnce Scholarship. Established in 1926 to assist a 
young woman student of the University. 

Engineering Alumni Scholarship. Awarded to a student who is a can- 
didate for a Bachelor of Science degree in one of the four branches 
of engineering. 

Ray C. Fish Foundation Scholarships. Established in 1965 to aid and 
encourage a deserving young man and young woman of the enter- 
ing class. 

Thomas Flaxman Scholarship. Established in 1962 by Mr. Thomas 
Flaxman in honor of Dr. Lindsay Blayney to assist in providing 
educational opportunities for deserving students. 

Walter W. Fondren, Jr., Memorial Scholarship. Established in 1961 
by Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Trammell in memory of Walter W. Fon- 
dren, Jr., to assist men or women students. 

Thomas R. and Julia H. Franklin Scholarships. Established in 1937 
for annual scholarships to well-qualified, necessitous students. 

General Motors Scholarship. A scholarship for an entering Freshman, 
renewable through four years contingent on satisfactory work. 
Awarded in alternate years. 

Gibraltar Savings Association Scholarship. Established in 1959 for a 
male member of the entering Freshman class whose intention is to 
concentrate in the field of economics or business administration. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 83 

Maiy Parker Gieseke Scholarship. Awarded annually to a student 
who has been in residence at least one year. 

Blanche Randall Haden Scholarship. Awarded annually to a deserv- 
ing undergraduate specializing in economics. 

William D. and Lucy L. Haden Travel fund. Founded by Mr. Cecil 
R. Haden for the purpose of providing an opportunity for sopho- 
more architecture students to make a class field trip to visit various 
areas of the United States. 

Haskins and Sells Foundation Scholarship in Accounting. Awarded to 
a Senior student having high academic standing in accounting, and 
planning to enter the fifth year of the accounting program. 

William Clifford Hogg Fund. Established by the will of William Clif- 
ford Hogg in 1936. From this fund two scholarships are awarded 
annually, the Will Hogg Memorial Distinguished Studentship and 
the Will Hogg Memorial Scholarship. 

Hohenthal Scholarships. Awarded to students of high scholastic 
standing who are earning a substantial part of their expenses. 

Houston Engineering and Scientific Society Scholarship. Awarded to 
a Senior or fifth-year engineering student who is recommended to 
the Society by a committee of the University faculty. 

William V. Houston Scholarship. An award to an incoming male 
Freshman student established in 1961 by Dr. George Robert Ko- 
lodny. 

M. M. Feld and J. P. Hamblen Interfaith Charity Scholarship. Pro- 
vided by the Interfaith Charity Bowl, Inc., to assist a student ac- 
tive in interfaith pursuits. 

Louis F. Israel Premedical Scholarship. Donated by Dr. Israel in 1962 
to assist a needy and worthy premedical student. 

Jefferson Chemical Company, Inc., Scholarship. Established in 1967, 
there are two scholarships awarded to students above the Sopho- 
more level, one in Chemistry and one in Chemical Engineering. 

Joint Organization for Business Survival Scholarships. Established in 
1965 to assist students in the general area of marine biology and 
oceanography. 

Jones College Scholarship. Made available by the Mary Gibbs Jones 
College Cabinet for a member of the college who has maintained 
high academic standing and has contributed significantly to the col- 
lege life. 

Jesse H. Jones Naval Scholarships. Given in honor of Fleet Admiral 
William F. Halsey, Jr., and General Alexander Archer Vandegrift. 



84 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

All members of the N.R.O.T.C. unit, including entering students 
are eligible. 

Grant William Jordan and Cora Jordan Memorial Fund. Available 
in trust to assist young men and women in obtaining an education 
at Rice University. 

Louise S. Koehler Scholarship. Established in 1965 by the will of 
Louise S. Koehler for the assistance of young women in securing 
an education at Rice University. 

Lady Washington Texas Centennial Award. Made annually to a 
young woman student from funds donated by the Lady Washing- 
ton Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Patrons of E. L. Lester and Company Scholarship. An annual award 
provided by E. L. Lester and Company in honor of its employees 
and customers, for an entering male student in engineerig, physi- 
cal science, or related fields. 

M. David Lowe's Personnel Services, Inc., Scholarship. Awarded to a 
student majoring in the Behavioral Sciences. 

Lubrizol Scholarship. Provided by the Lubrizol Foundation for a 
third-, fourth-, or fifth-year student in chemical engineering. 

Margaret Brokaw McCann Scholarship. Established by her husband 
the late S. G. McCann, first Rice Registrar, by their son, Dr. S. M. 
(Donald) McCann, and by many friends, it is awarded to a high- 
ranking, deserving young woman of one of the three upper classes, 
who plans advanced work in nursing, medicine, or other welfare 
fields. It was first awarded for the 1963-64 academic year. 

John T. McCants Prize in Accounting. Established by friends in 1965 
in honor of the late Mr. John T. McCants, first Bursar of Rice 
University. Awarded to a deserving Senior planning to enter the 
fifth year of the accounting program. 

Emma S. McGree Scholarships. Established by the will of Mrs. Emma 
S. McGree in 1964 in honor of Miss Katie Scherffius and Mr. John 
T. Scherffius; for entering Freshmen men and women. 

T. S. Martino Scholarship. The will of T. S. (Tony) Martino, long- 
time head gardener of the campus, bequeathed a generous fund 
which will provide scholarship assistance for undergraduate stu- 
dents. 

Leonard S. Meiuhinney Scholarship. Established in 1952 by the 
Brown Foundation, is awarded to a Naval R.O.T.C. engineering 
student enrolled in his fifth year at Rice University who has at- 
tained high academic standing and demonstrated aptitude for the 
naval service. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 85 

Achille and Malline Meyer Memorial Scholarship. Awarded annually 
to a fully or partially self-sustained student of the University. 

Fannie Bess Emery Montgomery Scholarship. Established in 1963 by 
the John McKnitt Alexander Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution to assist a worthy young woman. 

Ida R. and Hanna E. Nussbaum Scholarship. Provides an undergrad- 
uate scholarship in memory of the late Miss Ida R. Nussbaum and 
her sister. 

Rebecca Raphael and Lilly G. Nussbaum Scholarship. Established 
under the will of the late Miss Ida R. Nussbaum in memory of her 
mother and sister. 

Charles Breckenridge Parkhill Scholarship in Political Science. An en- 
dowed scholarship established by J. M. Lykes, Jr., in honor and 
memory of his grandfather, to be awarded annually to a worthy upper- 
classman majoring in political science. 

Price Waterhouse Foundation Scholarship. Awarded to fifth-year Ac- 
counting students. 

Procter and Gamble Scholarships. A four-year scholarship established 
by the Procter and Gamble Company for one or more entering 
Freshmen who plan to study in the field of engineering or science. 
The first award was made in the fall of 1963. 

Eynanucl and Mose Raphael Scholarship. Established by bequest of 
Miss Ida R. Nussbaum in memory of her uncles. 

William Marsh Rice Tuition Grants. Established by the Board of 
Governors of Rice University in 1965 to provide assistance to stu- 
dents from Texas having financial need. 

Richardson Fund. Bequeathed in trust by Mrs. Libbie A. Richardson, 
widow of Alfred S. Richardson, who was a charter member of the 
Board of Trustees of Rice University. 

Daniel Ripley Scholarship. Established in 1927 by the late Mrs. Edith 
Ripley in memory of her husband. Awarded to a self-supporting 
young man or woman completing the Freshman year with out- 
standing scholarship. 

Edith Ripley Scholarships. Established in 1928 by the late Mrs. Edith 
Ripley to be awarded annually to three young women students. 

James M. and Sarah Wade Rockwell Scholarships. Established by a 
fund donated in 1958 in memory of the founders of the Rockwell 
Fund, Inc. 

Catherine Withers Roper and Benjamin E. Roper Memorial Scholar- 
ships. Established through the will of their daughter, Miss Mary 
Withers Roper, to assist worthy students of the University. 



86 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Schlumberger Collegiate Award. Given by the Schlumberger Founda- 
tion for an advanced student with high standing in physics, geol- 
ogy, or electrical or mechanical engineering. 

Sara Stratford Scholarship. For women students of Rice University 
commemorating the late Mrs. Sara Stratford, first Adviser to 
Women. 

Terra Club Scholarship. Awarded to an undergraduate or graduate 
geology student. 

Texaco Scholaships. Made possible by Texaco, Inc. Awaded to Ju- 
nior and Senior students of proven scholastic ability who have dem- 
onstrated qualities of leadership. 

H. Piatt Thompson Scholarship. Established in 1965 to assist a male 
student from the state of Texas who is enrolled in Civil Engineer- 
ing. 

University Tuition Grants. Established by the Board of Governors of 
Rice University in 1965 to assist students having financial need, re- 
gardless of residence. 

University Women's Alliance Scholarship. Awarded to a Junior or Se- 
nior girl, preferably a resident of Texas who is in need of finan- 
cial assistance. 

Vulcan Materials Company Scholarship in Architecture. Established 
in 1956 for students in architecture above Sophomore standing. 
Awards are made annually during the first semester. 

John B. Warren, Jr., Scholarship. Established in 1966 to be awarded 
to a worthy male Pre-Law or Mechanical Engineering student. 

Abe and Rae Weingarten Scholarships. Established by the named do- 
nors in 1963 to assist needy and qualified students to continue 
their education. 

Harris Weingarten Scholarship. Established by Abe and Joe Weingar- 
ten in memory of their father. First awarded in 1957. 

Western Electric Fund Scholarship. Maintained by the Western 
Electric Fund for a student in engineering who has demonstrated 
exceptional promise and ability in his chosen field. 

Blanche White Honor Scholarships. Awarded solely on academic ex- 
cellence to students earning exceptionally high scholastic standing. 

Student Loans 

Students who find themselves in need of financial assistance to help 
defray academic expenses, such as fees, books, and room and board 
charges, should address inquiries to the Financial Aid Officer, Lovett 
Hall. Several types of loan funds are administered by this office, in- 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 87 

eluding the National Defense Student Loans and loans provided 
through the generosity of a number of friends of the University. 

Karl Bailey-William Carroll Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 
1956 by friends of Karl B. Bailey and William Carroll. 

Frank McFadden Caldwell Loan Fund. Established in 1953 by Mr. 
and Mrs. L. C. Caldwell in memory of their son Frank McFadden 
Caldwell. 

Louise Adele Drenkle Loan Fund. Established in 1965 by Mrs. Ca- 
mille W. Brown in memory of Louise Adele Drenkle, widow of 
Colonel James Wood Nichols. 

Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund. Established in 1931 in memory of 
Mary Alice Elliott by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Card G. Elliott. 
Awarded to a fifth-year student or alumnus of the Department of 
Architecture under thirty years of age for foreign travel and study. 

Houston Bridge League Loan Fund. Established in 1962 by the 
Houston Bridge League. 

Leo M. Levy Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 1947 by the Jew- 
ish Family Servdce. 

Lora B. Peck Loan Fund. Established by the College Women's Club 
of Houston in 1951. 

Rice University Students Loan Fund. Established in 1923 by a group 
of friends of the University. 

Students Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 1936 by the will of 
William Clifford Hogg in memory of his father and mother. 

Owen Wister Literary Society Alumnce Loan Fund. Established in 
1940 by the Owen Wister Literary Society Alumnae. 



Student Employment 



It is strongly recommended that students in their first year do not 
plan part-time employment unless absolutely necessary to meet ex- 
penses. A college course of study is a full-time job requiring fifty to 
sixty hours per week to do justice to the educational opportunities 
presented tlirough course work. In addition, every student should 
take advantage of the many other opportunities for giowth and de- 
velopment that come through participation in the social, political, 
and cultural activities of the colleges and the student government. 
New students who must supplement their income are advised to con- 
sult the Financial Aid Officer. 

There are on the campus and in the city opportunities in consider- 
able variety for worthy and deserving students to earn a part of their 
expenses. Interested students should visit the Placement Office in the 
Memorial Center as early as possible. 



Academic Honors and Awards 



Honor Societies 

The Phi Beta Kappa Society. The Senate of the United Chapters 
of Phi Beta Kappa at its meeting in December, 1927, voted to recom- 
mend the establishment of a chapter at the University and at a meet- 
ing of the National Council held in September, 1928, the institution 
of the Rice, or Beta of Texas, chapter was duly authorized. The 
chapter was formally installed on March 1, 1929, by the secretary of 
the United Chapters. 

The Society of the Sigma Xi, for the promotion of research in sci- 
ence, on the occasion of its thirty-eighth annual convention in De- 
cember, 1937, acting upon the recommendation of the Executive 
Committee, duly authorized the establishment of a chapter of the So- 
ciety at the University. The formal installation of the Rice chapter 
by the president of the national organization took place on March 
23, 1938. 

The Tau Beta Pi Association, organized to interest engineering stu- 
dents in competing for high standing in scholarship authorized at 
its annual convention on October, 1940, the establishment of a chap- 
ter of the Association at the University. The Rice chapter, the Gamma 
of Texas, was formally installed on December 18, 1940, by the national 
secretary of the Association. 

Delta Phi Alpha, German national honorary society, was founded 
to promote among university students an interest in the German lan- 
guage and literature. The National Council in April, 1949, author- 
ized the organization of the Gamma Xi Chapter at Rice. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon, an honorary chemical society, has as its pur- 
pose "the promotion of high scholarship and original investigation in 
all branches of pure and applied chemistry." The Alpha Alpha Chap- 
ter was installed at the University in 1927. 

The Pi Delta Phi Society, organized to interest students of French 
in competing for high standing in scholarship, authorized in May, 
1930, the formation of a chapter of the Society at Rice. The Theta 
Chapter was formally installed in that year by a delegate of the na- 
tional organization. 

Sigma Delta Pi, Spanish national honorary society, was founded to 
promote among university students an interest in the Spanish language 
and literature. The chapter at the University was installed on May 14, 
1953. 



ACADEMIC HONORS AND AWARDS 89 

The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sigma Tau, an engineering society de- 
voted to scholarship, practicality, and sociability, was installed at the 
University on May 20, 1953. 

Tau Sigma Delta, a National Honor Society in Architecture and 
Applied Arts. The Tau Chapter was established at the University on 
May 7, 1961. 



Prizes and Awards 

Several prizes and awards are presented annually in recognition of 
accomplishment in various endeavors. They are made possible by in- 
dividuals and organizations who wish to encourage students in cer- 
tain activities and honor the name of a friend or a relative. These 
prizes constitute a signal honor to the recipient. 

The American Institute of Architects Award is presented to a fifth- 
year architectural student on the basis of undergraduate scholastic 
achievement, character, and promise of professional ability. 

The American Institute of Architects Henry Adams Aioard is granted 
to the alternate of the American Institute of Architects Award. 

The Alpha Rho Chi Medal is awarded to a fifth-year architectural 
student on the basis of leadership, service, and sign of promise in the 
profession of architecture. 

The Hubert E. Bray Award is presented to the outstanding Fresh- 
man student of Jones College. 

The James H. ChiUman, Jr., Prize is awarded annually by the Rice 
Architectural Alumni Association for the best pictorial or graphic 
presentation of a building during the year. 

The Engineerijig Alumni Watch Award is presented to the fifth- 
year engineering student adjudged by the faculty to have achieved the 
outstanding scholastic record during his undergraduate work at Rice 
The Featherlite Corporation Axoard is offered by the Featherlite 
Corporation to a fourth-year architectural student on the basis of an 
architectural design competition. 

The Meador Dean Francis Award is offered each year by Tau Beta 
Pi to the outstanding Junior engineering student. 

The Max Freund Prize was established in 1954 by former students 
of Professor Emeritus Max Freund for a student of high academic 
standing who is pursuing a course of study in German language or 
literature. 

The Lady Geddes Prize in Writing is awarded annually on the basis 
of a competition which is open to all Freshman and Sophomore stu- 
dents of Rice University. 

The Hamilton Watch Aioard is provided by the Hamilton Watch 
Company for the fifth-year engineering student who has most success- 
fully combined proficiency in his major field with notable work in 
the humanities. 



90 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

The Claude W. Heaps Prize in Physics has been awarded annually 
since 1960 to an outstanding vmdergraduate student in physics. The 
prize, provided by students and friends of the late Professor Heaps, 
serves to honor his memory. 

The Robert Pilcher Qitinn Award is presented annually to a stu- 
dent who has demonstrated outstanding qualities in athletics, leader- 
ship, scholarship, and sportsmanship. 

The James S. Waters Creativity Prize was established by an anony- 
mous donor in 1965. It is a competitive prize awarded annually to an 
undergraduate student in engineering. 

The Eloise Szabo Witte Studentship in history is awarded to the 
member of the Freshman class who has demonstrated the greatest 
promise in that subject and has indicated a desire for further study of 
history, preferably Biblical or ancient history. 



Student Life 

Student Responsibility 

Each member of the University community is expected to govern 
his conduct by standards of good taste and ethical judgment and to 
exercise his responsibility even when these standards are disregarded 
by others. It is assumed that students, having voluntarily enrolled in 
that community, will be responsible members who will abide by the 
regulations and accepted practices of the University until such time 
as these may be changed by orderly procedure. 

Rice University encourages student self-government and self-disci- 
pline within the framework of its general objectives. It is the respon- 
sibility of the University to examine continuously its presuppositions 
and practices. Students are encouraged to participate in this process 
through appropriate investigation, questioning, discussion, and criti- 
cism. 

While Rice University generally does not attempt to regulate the 
behavior of individuals off campus, it does have a proper concern 
with any behavior on or off campus which may bring discredit or 
harm to an individual or to the University. 

Any individual or collective enterprise using the name of the Uni- 
versity or its Colleges is required to have prior approval of Univer- 
ity officials. 

The University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any 
student who fails to accept his responsibility, as evidenced by conduct 
or scholastic achievement considered detrimental to his own or the 
University's best interests. Such action is required only after careful 
consideration by appropriate agencies of the student government 
and/or officials of the faculty and administration. 



The Honor System 



One of the oldest and proudest of the traditions at Rice is its honor 
system administered by a student Honor Council whose members 
are elected annually by the student body. Adopted by a vote of the 
student body in 1916, the system has remained essentially unchanged, 
except for changes in procedures and membership of the Honor 
Council to reflect changes in the University. One of the most signifi- 
cant of these changes currently under study is the recent development 
of a sizeable graduate student body. 

91 



92 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

All written examinations and certain specifically designated assign- 
ments are conducted under the honor code. The student body, 
through its commitment to the honor system, accepts responsibility 
for assuring the validity of all examinations and assignments con- 
ducted under the system. The Honor Council is responsible for inves- 
tigation of all reported violations and for trial in those cases where 
the facts warrant. The Dean of Students reviews the results of investi- 
gations and trials and acts upon recommendations for penalties. The 
Honor Council conducts a continuing program to orient new stu- 
dents and faculty members to the responsibilities and privileges of 
the system. 



The Residential Colleges 

On entering Rice, every undergraduate student becomes and there- 
after remains a member of one of seven colleges. Baker, Hanszen, 
Wiess, Will Rice and the newly erected Lovett College to be opened 
early in the 1968-69 academic year are men's colleges. Margaret 
Root Brown and Mary Gibbs Jones are the colleges for women. Each 
of the colleges is a self-governing community of students, whose 
elected officers and representatives have powers commensurate with 
their responsibilities for maintaining not only an orderly routine of 
daily life, but also broad social, cultural, and athletic programs. 
Among the colleges, the memberships are approximately equal, with 
all the academic disciplines proportionately represented. While uni- 
formity has not been sought and practices differ from college to col- 
leo^e, all are alike in seeking to foster in their members the intellec- 
tual awareness and the sense of individual honor and group responsi- 
bility that distinguish educated persons. Each college has a Master 
who, with his family, occupies the Master's House adjacent to the 
College. The Masters of the colleges have direct responsibility for all 
aspects of student life in their respective colleges. They are particu- 
larly responsible for stimulating intellectual and cultural interests, 
for encouraging student self-discipline and good behavior, and for 
the development of effective student government within the colleges. 
In the women's colleges, the Associate Dean of Students works closely 
with the Masters in matters of counseling and discipline. Other mem- 
bers of the faculty are selected by the Masters, with the advice of the 
members of the colleges, as resident and nonresident Associates to as- 
sist the Masters in carrying out their responsibilities. 

Upon acceptance by the University, each undergraduate student 
will be designated a member of one or another of the colleges. Two 
students who are entering Rice for the first time may ask to be as- 
signed to the same college, but may not designate which college. A 
new student may request membership in the same college as a close 
relative. No other choice of college can be allowed. 



STUDENT LIFE 



93 



The buildings of each college include a dining hall and common 
rooms, available to resident and nonresident alike, as well as quarters 
for an average of about 215 students of all classes. Rooms in the 
men's colleges are completely furnished except for linens, window 
drapes, and rugs. Rooms in the women's colleges are completely fur- 
nished except for linens and rugs. 



Student Government and Activities 
Student Government 

All undergraduates are members of the Rice Student Association 
This organization of the student body is governed through the Stu- 
dent Senate, made up of the five elected officers of the Student Asso- 
ciation, the president of the Freshman class, two senators from each 
college, and an off-campus senator elected from the student body at 
large. Except for those student functions under the colleges, all stu- 
dent activities are directly or indirectly under the jurisdiction of the 
Student Senate. In addition, each of the five classes— Freshman, Soph- 
omore, Junior, Senior, and Class II Graduate— has its elected officers. 

Most disciplinary offenses are tried in student courts. The Honor 
Council, as noted above, administers the honor system and conducts 
hearings and trials for offenses against it. Each college has a court 
which enforces college and University regulations among its members. 
An Inter-College Court has authority over offenses by student organi- 
zations and may act upon request in matters of an all-school nature 
involving members of more than one college. The University admin- 
istration retains ultimate authority and responsibility in all matters 
of discipline. 

Student Activities 

In addition to the many activities of the residential colleges, there 
is a variety of campus-wide student activities. The official publica- 
tions include the Thresher, the weekly campus newspaper, and the 
Campanile, the University annual. A student literary magazine, 
Janus, is published from two to three times a year. Rice engineering 
students publish the quarterly Rice Engineer. A Student Forum Com- 
mittee sponsors a series of speakers on issues of current interest. 

Student organizations are numerous. Many are associated with spe- 
cial academic and professional disciplines. These include the foreign 
language clubs, the Architectural Society, the student affiliate of the 
American Chemical Society, and student branches of the American 
Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers, the American Institute of Physics, the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engi- 



94 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

neers, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of 
Electrical and Electronic Engineers. The Army and Navy R.O.T.C. 
students have the Chevron and the Sextant, respectively, to represent 
their special interests. A Film Guild, a Forensic Society, and a Sports 
Car Club exist for those interested in these matters. The Rice Players 
is a dramatic group sponsored by members of the faculty. For the 
musically inclined there are the Rice Band and other musical and 
choral groups. Students with active political interests may affiliate 
with the Young Democrats or the Young Republicans. 

Women Students may affiliate with one of the three literary socie- 
ties—the Chaille Rice, the Elizabeth Baldwin, or the Owen Wister. 
The Rally Club is a special service organization for men. 

Rice students are affiliated with a number of denominational reli- 
gious organizations. These include the Baptist Student Union, the 
Canterbury Association, the Christian Science Organization, the Hil- 
lel Society, the Lutheran Student Association, the Newman Club, the 
United Campus Christian Fellowship, and the W^esley Foundation. 
These organizations are represented on the Student Interfaith Coun- 
cil, a group chartered by the Student Association. 

Through the generosity of the late Mrs. James L. Autry, as a me- 
morial to the late James L. Autry of Houston, the Diocese of Texas 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church maintains Autry House in the 
immediate vicinity of Rice University as a social and religious center. 
The cornerstone of Autry House was laid during the commencement 
ceremonies of the Class of 1921. To this community group of the 
Episcopal church, the late Mrs. E. L. Neville of Houston, in memory 
of her brother, contributed the beautiful Edward Albert Palmer Me- 
morial Chapel, which was dedicated November 27, 1927. All the op- 
portunities of these establishments are available to the students of 
Rice Universiy irrespective of religious affiliation. 

Student Association Service Aiuard 

In memory of Hugh Scott Cameron, first Dean of Students at the 
University, the Student Association annually presents the Rice Service 
Award, in the form of a bronze medallion, to those currently en- 
rolled or former students who have been most exemplary in render- 
ing distinguished service to the school and to the student body. This 
coveted honor is sparingly bestowed after careful consideration of 
possible recipients by a committee of faculty and students appointed 
by the Association. 



The Student Health Service 

Rice University operates a Student Health Service to give prompt 
attention to the acute medical needs of its students. Any student, 



STUDENT LIFE 95 

graduate or undergraduate, may avail himself of the services offered 
by presenting himself in the clinic located in Hanszen College or the 
substation located in Jones College, South. A registered nurse is on 
duty during school hours; qualified attendants are available at all 
hours. 

Physicians in the Health Service offer care for the treatment of 
acute illnesses and injuries. All chronic ailments or medical condi- 
tions requiring extensive investigation are referred to nearby practic- 
ing physicians for consultation, as are the more severe illnesses and 
injuries that require hospital treatment. 

Medical care given on campus by the Health Service is covered by 
the annual Health Service fee. Additional medical care, hospitaliza- 
tion, extensive laboratory tests and prescriptions are not covered by 
this agreement. Most medications given to the student from the 
Health Service are free of charge. However, a small charge is made 
for some of the more expensive antibiotics. Immunizations are avail- 
able as needed in the Health Service at no charge to students. 

It is highly recommended that all students avail themselves of the 
group health insurance made available to all students of the Univer- 
sity. Application forms may be obtained from the secretary of the 
Health Service. This insurance covers hospital charges, part of the 
physician's charges when the patient is hospitalized, and also a por- 
tion of laboratory and consultation charges when a student is seen in 
a private physician's office. 

Closely associated with the Student Health Service, the University 
Psychiatric Service seeks to provide help to students or faculty who 
may need its services. Consultation service is provided without 
charge. In some instances, it is also possible to offer brief treatment 
on a no-fee basis. When it is clear that more prolonged work is neces- 
sary, the individual may be referred to a private physician or a low 
cost clinic, as indicated. The services are available on an appoint- 
ment basis in an office located on the campus. In addition, an at- 
tempt is made to have some time available for "drop in" visits dur- 
ing regular office hours. An appointment may be made directly by a 
student, or anyone he delegates, at either the campus office or at the 
doctor's office at Baylor University College of Medicine. Certain pro- 
visions have been made for emergency situations occurring outside of 
office hours. The confidential relationship of the doctor and patient 
is carefully maintained as necessary to the effectiveness of the Service. 



Memorial Center Facilities 

The Rice Memorial Center was built through the generosity of 
friends and alumni. Ground was broken for this building on Novem- 
ber 9, 1957, and it was dedicated on Homecoming weekend in the 
fall of 1958. The center and chapel comprise a memorial to those 



96 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Rice alumni who have died in the service of their country, and pro- 
vision was made in the plans for commemorative inscriptions. 

The center includes a chapel with associated offices. The chapel is 
utilized for regular nondenominational religious services, directed by 
a faculty committee with the assistance of a student chapel commit- 
tee. 

The center provides offices for the Dean of Students, the Associa- 
tion of Rice Alumni, the Student Association, the Honor Council, 
and various student publications. It also contains the Campus Store 
and Sammy's, the snack bar, as well as lounge and ballroom facilities. 

Athletics 

Rice is a charter member of the Southwest Athletic Conference 
and participates in the intercollegiate athletic contests sponsored by 
the conference. Football games are played in the 70,000-seat Rice Sta- 
dium and basketball in the Autry Court in the Rice Gymnasium. 

There is a very active program on intramural athletics in both 
team and individual sports. Facilities include an indoor swimming 
pool, tennis, handball, and squash courts, gymnastic rooms, and play- 
ing fields. 

Student Automobiles 

All students at Rice currently enjoy the privilege of bringing auto- 
mobiles on the campus. All such automobiles, however, must be regis- 
tered with the Office of the Dean of Students at the beginning of the 
school year or whenever first brought on the campus. Desirable park 
ing spaces are at a premium, and any student operating an automo- 
bile on the campus may park only in the areas assigned. Off-campus 
students have two options. They may park without payment of fee in 
the Stadium lot, or they may pay a nominal annual fee entitling 
them to park in special Commuting Student lots. Any automobiles 
parked or operated on the campus are there solely at the owner's 
risk. Failure to abide by the regulations will result in monetaiy fines 
for specific offenses and the withdrawal of driving privileges in the 
case of flagrant abuses. Copies of the University Traffic and Parking 
Regulations may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Stu- 
dents. 



Part Four 

Information for Graduate 
Students 

General Information 

Areas of Study and Degrees 

Requirements for Professional Degrees 

Requirements for Research Degrees 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 

Graduate Student Life 



General Information 



Since the opening of the University in 1912, then the Rice Insti- 
tute, the emphasis has been on scholarship, and graduate study and 
research ha\e been carried on as a principal means of advancing 
knowledge. The first Doctor of Philosophy degree was awarded in 
1918 in Mathematics. Since that time graduate study has been ex- 
panded through the basic sciences, the humanities, engineering and, 
more recently, economics and the behavioral sciences, and the num- 
ber of graduate students steadily increased. Within the next few years 
expansion will continue. The number of graduate students is ex- 
pected to increase from about 700 to around 1,200 and additional 
fields will be open to graduate study, probably in the social sciences 
and in interdepartmental areas. 

Areas of Study and Degrees 

Graduate study is offered in two broad categories. Research ori- 
ented programs in the Graduate Division lead to the Doctor of Philos- 
ophy degree, the Master of Arts degree or the Master of Science de 
gree. Professional degrees beyond the baccalaureate are offered in En- 
gineering. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is awarded in biology, behav- 
ioral science, chemical engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, eco- 
nomics, electrical engineering, English, environmental science and en- 
gineering, French, geology, German, history, mathematics, mechanical 
and aerospace engineering and materials science, philosophy, physics, 
and space science. Various areas of specialization are available within 
these fields of study. 

The degree of Master of Arts is available in the humanities and 
scientific fields of study including the social sciences and the Master 
of Science degree may be obtained in the fields of chemical, civil, 
electrical or mechanical and aerospace engineering and materials sci- 
ence. The Master in Architecture is also offered. Professional degrees 
of Master of Chemical Engineering, Master of Civil Engineering, 
Master of Electrical Engineering, and Master of Mechanical Engi- 
neering are also awarded. 

For specific information refer to the statements of the various de- 
partments in Part Five, pp. 113-242. Additional information is available 
from the Chairman of each of the Departments. Prospective students 
are encouraged to write the Chairman of the Department of interest 
for a pamphlet or bulletin of information or for answers to specific 
questions. 

99 



100 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Requirements for Professional Degrees 
in Engineering 

Candidates for the Master's degree in a specified branch of Engi- 
neering are required to complete ten semester-courses satisfactorily 
and be recommended for the degree by the department of specializa- 
tion. The ten courses submitted must be approved by the student's 
advisor in his major department. Two of the ten courses must be 
Group A or B courses (see p. 54). In addition the student must have 
completed the courses of the first four years of the Rice engineering 
curriculum, or satisfactory equivalents. 

Chemical Engineering. Flexibility in course planning permits spe- 
cialization in such areas as economics, nuclear engineering, reservoir 
engineering, process control, optimization and systems analysis, ap- 
plied mathematics, material science, kinetics and catalysis. Each stu- 
dent is registered in a departmental seminar and laboratory in addi- 
tion to his required ten courses. 

Civil Engineering. The detailed program of each student is formu- 
lated in consultation with his departmental advisor. Flexibility in 
course requirements permits some specialization in structural engi- 
neering and mechanics, soil mechanics and soils engineering, environ- 
mental engineering, or applied mathematics. 

Electrical Engineering. Technical electives permit some specializa- 
tion in the general areas of systems and information theory, solid- 
state and physical electronics, and computer science. 

Mechanical Engineering. For properly qualified students, flexibility 
in course requirements premits specialization in aerospace engineer- 
ing, engineering mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, or materials 
science. 

Requirements for Research Degrees 

Residence 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is awarded after the successful 
completion of a program of advanced study extending to the frontier 
of knowledge and an original investigation reported in an approved 
thesis. Normally, three or more years of study are required after ad- 
mission to graduate study. At least two years of full-time study, or 
the equivalent of 60 semester hours, must be in residence at Rice. As 
final evidence of his preparation for this degree, the candidate must 
pass a public oral examination. 

The Master of Arts, Master in Architecture, or Master of Science 
degree may be obtained after completion of at least 30 semester 
hours of study including the thesis, 24 of which must have been in 
residence at Rice. Programs will generally include a piece of original 
work embodied in a thesis, and the candidate's preparation will be 



GENERAL INFORMATION 101 

evidenced by a public examination. Students whose undergraduate 
preparation has not included sufficient advanced work usually will 
require at least two years to complete the requirements for a Master 
of Arts, Architecture, or Science. 



Language Requirements 

Foreign language requirements for the Master's and Doctor's de- 
grees are established by the individual departments according to the 
need for foreign languages in the conduct of research and scholarship 
in their respective fields. 

Approval of Candidacy 

Students seeking the master's or doctor's degree must submit a peti- 
tion through their departmental chairman to the Graduate Council 
for the approval of candidacy. The chairman will certify that the ap- 
plicant has fulfilled the University requirement of the qualifying ex- 
amination, that he has passed the foreign language tests, and that the 
character of his own work within the department is of high quality. 

The final thesis oral examination can be given only after the can- 
didacy has been approved by the Graduate Council. 

Applications for the approval of candidacy for the Ph.D. degree 
must be filed in the Graduate Office prior to November 1, and for 
the master's degree prior to March 1, of the academic year in which 
graduation is expected. The student must have been approved for 
the candidacy for the Ph.D. before the end of his sixth semester of 
residence at Rice in order to be eligible for continued financial sup- 
port. Appointments and support of graduate study are not continued 
for more than four years except in legitimate cases approved by the 
Graduate Council. 

Oral Examinations 

The committee for the oral examination is appointed by the Grad- 
uate Council at the time the candidacy is approved. The oral com- 
mittee consists of at least three memlaers: the thesis director, one 
other member from the department, and one member in a related 
field outside the department. 

It is the responsibility of the candidate to inform the members of 
his committee of the nature of his research and his progress; before 
March 15 the members of his committee must approve his thesis in 
preliminary form. 

The oral examination may be scheduled at any time prior to the 
first Friday of Examination Week of the academic year in which the 
degree is expected, provided that the examination is announced in 
the Rice weekly Calendar of Events the previous week. In appropri- 
ate circumstances an oral examination may be scheduled during the 
summer. The posting of notice of the time and place of the exami- 



102 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

nation on the bulletin board of Fondren Library the preceding week 
will be acceptable as the public announcement. 

The length of the examination and the character of the subject 
matter on which the candidate will be examined is left to the judg- 
ment of the committee. In the event of the failure of the candidate, 
the chairman may reschedule the examination a second time. In the 
event of a second failure, the student will be required to withdraw 
from the University. 

Thesis Regulations and Procedure 

The thesis is the principal record of work for an advanced degree. 
It will be bound in buckram and permanently preserved in the li- 
brary, and it is important that the standard form indicated in the 
directions provided upon approval of candidacy be followed. Copies 
of these instructions may be obtained from the Graduate Office. 

More specific information about requirements for advanced degrees 
in each field of study is given under department headings in the sec- 
tion of this catalog describing course offerings, which begins on page 
113. 

By special arrangment with the head of the department in which 
he is specializing, a graduate student who is already a candidate for 
an advanced degree may enroll in an approved research course dur- 
ing the summer. Such enrollment will be for a twelve-week period 
starting with the end of the regular academic year. The registration 
fee and appropriate laboratory fees will be charged. 



Achnission to Graduate Study 

Graduate study is open to well-qualified students who possess ade- 
quate background in the field of study the candidate wishes to pur- 
sue. Normally, but not always, the equivalent of an undergraduate 
major in the field is required, but the final judgment of preparation 
rests with the department concerned; the emphasis is on the quality 
of the applicant's preparation rather than on the academic program 
pursued or credits earned in achieving it. A bachelor's degree is not a 
necessary prerequisite to admission to graduate study. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering 

Applicants who are in the fourth year of the engineering cuitIcu- 
lum at Rice make application to the Chairman of the department in 
which professional study is to be pursued. A prospective applicant 
who has not obtained undergraduate engineering training at Rice 
should write to the Dean of Engineering and Science for application 
forms and information. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 103 



Research Degrees 

An applicant for admission to graduate study for research degrees 
should address all communications to the chairman of the depart- 
ment in which he wishes to study. The chairman will provide the 
relevant information about the graduate program and the appropri- 
ate application form. The completed form, with the transcript and 
photograph, should be returned to the chairman of tlie department. 
After the members of the staff have made a preliminary evaluation, 
the application form with the letters of recommendation will be 
transmitted by the chairman to the Graduate Council for final ac- 
tion. Candidates are evaluated on their previous academic records, 
test scores available and their qualifications to pursue ad^'anced 
study. Their capability for research is primarily determined through 
references from scholars under whom they have studied. 

In addition to any specific requirements of the department, the ap- 
plicant will be expected to have at least a "B" average in his under- 
graduate work. Preference will be given to applicants who earn high 
scores on the Graduate Record Examination. Arrangements to take 
this examination may be made directly with the Educational Testing 
Service, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey. Applicants in the 
Houston area may also apply in person to the Graduate Office at 
Rice for the necessary forms. 

Normally, departments will provide all graduate students with a 
limited amount of teaching experience as part of their training for 
advanced degrees. 

Interdisciplinary programs in systems theory leading to the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy are open to students with backgrounds in 
mathematics, applied mathematics, engineering, physical science, or 
social sciences. Programs of instruction utilize common courses in sys- 
tems theory and applied mathematics, as well as specialized courses in 
the areas of principal research interest. A student working in systems 
theory is enrolled in one of the participating departments offering 
an advanced degree program in systems theory. Currently, these pro- 
grams are available in the departments of Chemical Engineering, 
Economics and Business Administration, Electrical Engineering, and 
Mathematical Sciences. These programs are highly interdisciplinary in 
nature and do not necessarily require an undergraduate major in the 
area of primary interest to the department. Supporting courses and 
research activities are available in a number of cooperating depart- 
ments, includinsf mathematics and the behavioral sciences. Courses 
and research interests include: Algorithm Theory, Artificial Intelli- 
gence, Biological Systems, Chemical Systems, Economic Development, 
Information Theory, Mathematical Programming, Modelling, Modern 
Control Theory, Network Theory, Operations Research and Eco- 
nomics, Optimization, Stability Theory, and Statistical Communica- 



104 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

tion Theory. For applications or additional information, contact the 
chairman of one of the following departments: Chemical Engineering, 
Economics and Business Administration, Electrical Engineering, and 
Mathematical Sciences. 

An interdisciplinary program in solid-state electronics and mate- 
rials science leading to the degrees of Master of Science or Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy is open to students with backgrounds in engi- 
neering or physical science. The course program consists of a com- 
mon group of courses taught jointly by the participating depart- 
ments. These basic courses are followed by more specialized courses 
and seminars given by the individual departments. Interdepartmental 
seminars are also offered. The research leading to the degrees is nor- 
mally supervised by an interdepartmental research committee. The 
student is enrolled in one of the participating departments, currently 
Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and 
Physics. However, the program is sufficiently flexible to accommodate 
students who do not necessarily have the corresponding undergraduate 
major. Current courses and research interests include the areas of 
Anelasticity, Electrical Conductivity, Electron Microscopy, Fermi Sur- 
faces, Ferroelectrics, Ferromagnetism, Lasers and Masers, Lattice 
Theory, Microwave Devices, Nuclear Detectors, Semiconductor De- 
vices, Solid Solutions, Thin Films, and Transport Phenomena. For 
applications or additional information contact the Chairman of one 
of the following departments: Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering, or Physics. 

The degree of Master of Arts is available in the humanities and 
scientific fields of study, and the degrees of Master in Architecture or 
Master of Science may also be obtained, the latter being awarded in 
chemical, civil, electrical, or mechanical engineering. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 

Tuition for full-time students enrolled in the Graduate Division is 
|1,700 per year, payable $850 at the beginning of each semester. In 
addition, each graduate student pays an annual Health Service fee of 
$17. 

The graduate programs at Rice University are designed for full- 
time study, but, in special circumstances, students are admitted to 
graduate study on a part-time basis. For students who have been ad- 
mitted to graduate study on a part-time basis, tuition is $90.00 per 
semester hour plus $50.00 registration fee each semester or summer 
period. The application of each such student must be clearly marked 
"Part-time" and initialed by the Department Chairman or a mem- 
ber of the faculty designated by him. Otherwise the student will be 
charged the full tuition rate of $1700 per year. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 105 

On the registration card of a part-time graduate student enrolled 
in "Research" or "Thesis" the adviser should designate the number of 
semester hours for which the student is to be charged. When this is 
not done, it will be assumed that the number of hours of "Research" 
or "Thesis" is sufficient to bring his total load to six semester hours 
each semester, and tuition charged accordingly. 

Students who have completed all work for an advanced degree ex- 
cept certain examinations and/or completion of a dissertation and are 
not on campus must be registered for the spring semester of the year 
in which the degree is to be awarded Such students will be required 
to pay only the $50.00 registration fee. The Registrar will accept reg- 
istration and fees in advance, prior to the student's leaving the cam- 
pus, if desired. 

Any student who is pursuing any phase of his graduate study on 
campus must be registered and pay appropriate tuition and fees, even 
though he is not engaged in course work. 

All foreign students are required to carry health insurance; the an- 
nual cost is approximately $26 for an individual, $65 for a couple, or 
$95 for a family. This expense is not included in the tuition or fees. 

A graduate student may purchase a Student Athletic Card, at a 
cost of four dollars, which will entitle him to admittance to all regu- 
larly scheduled athletic events. If married, he may purchase a season 
ticket for his wife at a reduced rate of one half the regular price, 
provided the season ticket is purchased at the beginning of the fall 
term. 



Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 
Fellowships 

Provision is made for a variety of fellowships available to gradu- 
ates of this and other universities. There are several memorial fellow- 
ships that have been founded and endowed by gift or bequest on the 
part of friends of Rice University. These provide a stipend designed 
to enable the holder to devote his time to study and research in his 
chosen field. There are also several industrial fellowships maintained 
by companies interested in the development of technical fields and 
the training of competent scientists and engineers. 

Persons desiring to be considered for appointment as fellows 
should consult with the department in which they desire to work. 

M. D. Anderson Fellowships in physics. 

Ora N. Arnold Fellowship Fund. Graduates of Rice University or of 
Mexico may be appointed. An incumbent from Rice may study in 
Mexico, the South American states, the West Indies, or the Philip- 



106 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

pine Islands; an incumbent from the University of Mexico is ex- 
pected to study at Rice University. 

Atlantic Refining Company Fellowship in Chemical engineering. 

Eleanor and Mills Bennett Fellowships in hydrology. 

Samuel Fain Carter Fellowship for graduate study in economics. 

Celanese Corporation Fellowship in chemical engineering. 

Continental Oil Company Fellowship in chemical engineering. 

M. N. Davidson Fellowship in architecture. Awarded to a fifth-year 
student. 

Camille-Henry Dreyjuss Fellowship in chemical engineering. 

Dow Chemical Company Fellowship in chemical engineering. 

Eastman Kodak Research Grant in chemistry. 

Ethyl Corporation Fellowship in chemical or mechanical engineering. 

Ideal CemeJit Company Fellowship in civil engineering. 

Edgar Odell Lovett Fellowship in mathematics. 

Mrs. L. F. McCollum Fellowship. 

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Traineeships. 

National Defense Education Act Fellowships. 

National Institute of Health Traineeships. 

National Science Foundation Traineeships. 

Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society. Fellow- 
ship in chemistry 

Phillips Petroleum Company Fellowship in mathematics. 

Schlumberger Foundation Fellowship in mathematics. 

Shell Oil Company Fellowships. One fellowship is available for study 
in physics and another for study in mechanical engineering. 

Suit Graduate Fellowship in Architecture. Awarded to a Latin Amer- 
ican student. 

Sun Oil Company Fellowship in chemical engineering. 

Texas Company Fellowship in electrical engineering. 

Unio?i Carbide Fellowship in Chemistry. 

United States Public Health Service Traineeship Awards in environ- 
mental engineering and biology. 

Robert A. Welch Foundation Fellowships. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 107 



Rice Graduate Fellowships 

Graduate students with high academic records and outstanding 
quahfications may receive assistance through awards of Rice Univer- 
sity Fellowships. The stipend for these appointments range up to 
|3,200 for a twelve-month tenure or three-fourths of the stated 
amount for nine-month tenures. Rice University Fellowships provide 
an additional grant of |1700 for the tuition. 

In some departments, Rice Teaching Assistants may be awarded to 
advanced (third- or fourth-year) students. If exceptional teaching abil- 
ity has been demonstrated, appointments known as Teaching Associ- 
ates are available. 



Graduate Tuition Scholarships 

Students whose previous records show marked promise but for 
whom no graduate fellowships are available may, especially in their 
first year of graduate study for a research degree, be awarded gradu- 
ate tuition scholarships without stipend. Graduate scholars may carry 
a full schedule of graduate work. 

Tuition grants based on need for financial assistance are available 
to students in the professional master's degree program. Normally 
Rice students who have received tuition grants from the University 
during their undergiaduate years may anticipate continuation of as- 
sistance as needed for the year of professional study. Others must file 
the P.C.S., which is the usual application for financial assistance 
through the College Scholarship Service. Information is available 
from the Financial Aid Office, the Dean of Engineering and Science, 
and the chairman of the engineering departments. 



Other Graduate Fellowships 

In addition to the above fellowships students may also pursue ad- 
vanced studies through Woodrow Wilson Fellowships and National 
Science Foundation Fellowships as well as by awards made from 
grants to the University through such agencies as the Atomic Energy 
Commission, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Aer- 
onautics and Space Administration. 

The Committee on Graduate Instruction processes applications for 
fellowships submitted by graduate students of Rice University for re- 
search in other institutions and in other countries. Among available 
fellowships of this nature are the Rotary Inteinational Fellowship, 
the Rhodes Scholarships, the Frank B. Jewett Fellowships awarded by 
the Bell Telephone Laboratories, and the National Science Founda- 
tion Fellowships. 



108 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Honors and Prizes 

The RalpJi Budd Award is a medal given for the best thesis in 
engineering. 

The Williarn Diinlap Darden Memorial Award is granted on the 
basis of achievements and contributions as demonstrated by the mas- 
ter's thesis in architecture. 

The John W. Gardner Award is a medal given to a student present- 
ing outstanding achievement in research in the humanities or social 
sciences. 

The Sigma Xi Awards are given annually by the Rice University 
Chapter of the Society of the Sigma Xi for proficiency in research. 
Candidates for degrees at both the master's and doctor's level are eli- 
gible. 

The H. A. Wilson Memorial Award provides a substantial prize 
for the best research in physics by a graduate student. 



Graduate Student Life 



Rice University encourages student self-discipline within the frame- 
work of its general objectives. It is the responsibility of the Univer- 
sity to examine continuously its presuppositions and practices. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to participate through appropriate examination, 
questioning, and criticism. Each member of the community, however, 
is expected to govern his conduct by standards of good taste and ethi- 
cal judgment and to exercise his responsibility even when these stan- 
dards are disregarded by others. It is assumed that students, having 
voluntarily enrolled, are in accord with the objectives and philosophy 
of the University and will abide by its regulations and accepted prac- 
tices. 

An individual or collective enterprise using the name of the Uni- 
versity or its colleges is required to have the approval of University 
authorities. While Rice University generally does not attempt to reg- 
ulate the behavior of individuals off campus, it does have a proper 
concern with any behavior on or off campus which may bring dis- 
credit or harm to an individual or to the University. 

The University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any 
student who fails to accept his responsibility, as evidenced by conduct 
or scholastic achievement considered detrimental to his own or the 
University's best interests. 

The Honor System 

Graduate students are expected to observe the provisions of the 
honor code. The provisions of the honor system are summarized on 
p. 91. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 109 

Housing 

At present the University has no housing on the campus for gradu- 
ate students. However, within walking distance of the campus there 
are many rooms and apartments for rent at reasonable prices. For the 
convenience of new students, the Dean of Students keeps a record of 
rooms and apartments about which he has been notified, and the 
daily newspapers list still others. Incoming graduate students are ad- 
vised to arrive in Houston a day or two early in order to find lodg- 
ing. 

Occasionally room and board for a graduate student may be avail- 
able in one of the undergraduate residential colleges. A graduate stu- 
dent wishing to be considered for such a room may write to the 
Dean of Students asking to be put on the waiting list. It will be 
advisable, however, to assume that lodging must be found off cam- 
pus, since obtaining an accommodation on the campus is unlikely 
and since the dean may not know before the term begins about va- 
cancies in the colleges. 



The Student Health Service 

A Health Service is maintained on campus to provide immediate 
medical attention as needed and assistance in treating minor ail- 
ments. Limited psychiatric consultation is also available. For more in- 
formation about the services provided refer to page 94. 



Part Five 

Courses of Instruction 



Courses of Instruction 

Course descriptions are listed alphabetically by departments of in- 
struction. For most of the departments these descriptions are 
preceded by statements of specific requirements for students majoring 
in the department both at the undergraduate and the graduate levels. 
These statements are supplemental to the general degree require- 
ments described on pages 53-62, 99-104. 

Courses numbers below 200 designate courses designed primarily 
for Freshmen; courses numbered from 200 to 299 are considered sec- 
ond-year courses and are open to Freshmen only with permission. 
Numbers from 300-499 are designated as advanced courses. They are 
open to students of the lower classes with permission and to graduate 
students on approval of the individual student's adviser. 

Courses designed for graduate students are numbered 500 and 
above. The methods of presentation and quality of work expected 
make them generally unsuited to undergraduate participation. Hence 
an undergraduate is permitted to enroll in a graduate-level course 
only after consultation with his adviser and with the instructor of 
the course. 

The letters "a" and "b" followinsr the course numbers indicate 
first-semester and second-semester courses respectively. Thus, Histoi7 
200a is taught only the first semester and History 201b only the sec- 
ond semester. Courses for which the number is not followed by a 
letter "a" or "b" may be taught either semester. When consecutive 
courses are shown with a single listing, as Biology 100a, b or Anthro- 
pology 370a, 371b, the first-semester course is prerequisite to the sec- 
ond. 

Figures entered in parentheses following the title of each course 
signify the number of class hours per week, the number of laboratory 
hours per week, and the semester-hours credit for the completed 
course, in that order. Thus, the entry (3-3-4) in Biology 360a means 
that the course meets three hours per week, has three hours of labo- 
ratory work per week and is evaluated at four semester-hours credit 
upon completion of the semester's work. 

HS 



114 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Architecture 

Professors Caudill, Director^ Evans, Morehead, Ransom, Todd 

Associate Professors Mitchell, Associate Director, Krahl, 

AND Newton 

Assistant Professors Leifeste, Mabe, Papademetriou, Schorre, 

AND Wong 

Lecturer Dyess 

Visiting Lecturer Kennon 

Preceptors, Plan A 

Richard L. Aeck, F.A.LA., of Aeck Associates, 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Harris Armstrong, F.A.LA., 

KiRKWooD, Missouri 

O'Neil Ford, F.A.LA., of O'Neil Ford and Associates, 

San Antonio, Texas 

E. G. Hamilton, A.LA., Harrell and Hamilton 

Dallas, Texas 

George S. Hellmuth, A.LA., Hellmuth, Obata, and Kassabaum 

St. Louis, Missouri 

John Lyon Reid, F.A.LA. 

San Francisco, California 

E. Davis Wilcox, A.LA. 

Tyler, Texas 

Gordon G. Wittenberg, F.A.LA., 

Wittenberg, Delony, and Davidson, Inc. 

Little Rock, Arkansas 

Preceptors, Plan B 

E. C. Bassett, A.LA., Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill 

San Francisco, California 

Thomas A. Bullock, A.LA., Caudill, Rowlett, Scott 

Houston, Texas 

William J. Geddis, A.LA., The Architects Collaborative 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Walter A. Netsch, Jr., A.LA., Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill 

Chicago, Illinois 

I. M. Pet, F.A.LA., I. M. Pei and Partners 

New York, New York 

Kevin Roche, A.LA., Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo, 

and Associates 

Hamden, Connecticut 

The profession of architecture is concerned with the physical envi- 
ronment of man. Each civilization, by its buildings and spaces, leaves 
a tangible record of its aims and beliefs through the expression of 
architecture. As contemporary society becomes increasingly urban, the 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 115 

architect's role in society is also becoming oriented toward urban 
problems in addition to the more traditional practice. The School of 
Architecture is fortunate to be located in metropolitan Houston, the 
South's largest city. The city offers students a wide range of profes- 
sional associations and cultural activities. The Houston area is char- 
acterized by rapidly expanding population and accelerated building 
activity. The school uses the city as a teaching laboratoi7 and its 
great variety of architectural examples— past, present, and under con- 
struction—as case studies. 

Three degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Architec- 
ture, and Master in Architecture. The undergraduate curriculum for 
the study of architecture is an accredited five-year program. After suc- 
cessful completion of the first four years of this program, the Bache- 
lor of Arts degree is awarded. At this time the candidate's work is 
evaluated before he is admitted to the fifth year, which leads to the 
professional degree of Bachelor of Architecture. The Master in Archi- 
tecture degree is offered for graduate study by candidates already 
holding a professional degree in architecture. 

All work at each class level is offered in a single course dealing 
with the three areas of knowledge requisite to the practice of archi- 
tecture: Design, Technology, and Management. At each level a pro- 
fessor of architecture directs the integrated program for the year and 
coordinates the instruction of a team of specialists in these tliree 
areas. The student body, selected on a highly competitive basis, is 
small. Because of this, it is possible to give special attention to each 
student in small studio groups. Through the flexibility inherent in 
an integrated program, each student is allowed the freedom to de- 
velop his own capabilities and talents. Special programs are devised 
to encourage the student to progress at a rate commensurate with his 
abilities and interests. 

In addition to the basic requirements of the University, students 
supplement their work in architectural studies through required and 
elective courses in various departments of the Division of Humani- 
ties, particularly in Fine Arts, for the history of art and for studio 
art courses in drawing, painting, and sculpture. 

Supplementing the regular academic instruction are several auxil- 
iary programs designed to span the gap between school and practice: 
the Rice Design Fetes, the Preceptorship Programs, the visiting lec- 
turer and visiting critic series. The Rice Design Fete is a research 
program in which outstanding practicing architects retuiTi to a uni- 
versity atmosphere and students are involved in professional design 
responsibilities during a two-week work session on the campus with 
the purpose of completing program analyses and architectural solu- 
tions for a specific building type selected by a research sponsor. In 
addition, outstanding students of the school are selected to partici- 
pate in the Preceptorship programs designed to span the gap between 
classroom studio learning and professional practice. Under the pro- 



116 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

gram, students work and study with noted professional architects des- 
ignated by the school as preceptors. There are two Preceptorship pro- 
grams now in effect. Plan A places students with preceptors for two- 
to-three-week periods during the academic year. Plan B allows stu- 
dents to work and study with their preceptors for an entire year, 
scheduled between the fourth and fifth years of study on the Rice 
campus. The school also publishes a series of reports on investiga- 
tions and thoughts from the School of Architecture titled Architec- 
ture at Rice. It is published in the belief that the education of ar- 
chitects can best be advanced if teachers, students, practitioners, and 
interested laymen share in what they are thinking and doing. Twice 
annually, ending the fall and spring semesters, outstanding practicing 
architects of local ond national significance are invited to participate 
in Jury Week during which each student's work— from the sophomore 
through the graduate class— is evaluated by a jury consisting of fac- 
ulty and visitors. In essence, the school offers a broad course in archi- 
tecture tied closely to the profession and based on an intense liberal 
arts background. 

Graduate Program in Architecture. The program leading to the 
Master in Architecture degree is concerned with the design of the 
total physical environment. The scope of investigation, study, and de- 
sign involves the broadest aspects of regional and urban design as 
well as the more particular design of specialized building types, tech- 
nology, artifacts, and furniture. The emphasis is upon the develop- 
ment of the individual with each candidate's program specifically 
geared to his background and abilities, his rate of progress, and his 
professional orientation. The method is by guidance through compar- 
ative analysis of different architectural solutions to develop in the 
candidate self-criticism and self-direction. The graduate program is 
carried as Architecture 601a, 602b and consists of three phases: 

1. An educational program to clarify architectural ideas and to 
achieve an assimilation of architectural principles by means of a se- 
ries of problems on a class basis. 

2. The selection of an area for research toward a thesis. 

3. The clarification of the thesis and the development of a demon- 
stration in the nature of a creative design. 

Each candidate for the master's degree must take Architecture 601a, 
602b and one advanced course outside the School of Architecture. 
Each candidate is assigned a faculty member as a thesis director, and 
the final presentation is made before a jury of faculty and visiting 
specialists. 

Courses 

Architecture 101a, 1 02b. Principles of Architecture (2-6-4, each sem.). 

a. Design: Communicative skill in various media; introduction to principles of 

design and their application to architecture; elementary architectural prob- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 1 1 7 

lem-solving; selected readings and essay composition; tours of museums and 
galleries. 

b. Technology: Introduction to the characteristics of materials; principles of ele- 
mentary structures; field trips to buildings under construction; awareness of 
mechanical equipment in buildings; architectural nomenclature. 

c. Management: Introduction to the profession and the place of the professional 
in society; introduction to allied professions; visits to architectural offices; re- 
view of current office organization and operation of professional practice. 

Laboratory fee recjuired. Staff 

Architecture 201a, 202b. Principles of Architecture (2-16-7, each 
sem.). 

a. Design: Application of basic architectural principles to single buildings— one- 
and two-story; short problems in interior design, landscape planning, and 
product design; house and neighborhood planning; study of environmental 
design determinants— physical and social. 

b. Technology: Design of simple structures in wood and masonry; basic prin- 
ciples in applications of plumbing, electrical, and mechanical systems; strength 
of materials; introduction to structural and design potential of basic building 

materials. 
c. Management: Organization of time; client relations; study of cost controls; 

professional responsibilities. 
Laboratory fee required. Staff 

Architecture 301a, 302b. Principles of Architecture (6-18-12, each sem.). 

a. Design: Variety of architectural design problems with one project completely 
developed in detail; housing and community planning. 

b. Technology: Structural theory in wood, steel and concrete; application of 
plumbing, electrical, and mechanical systems to design problems; perform- 
ance, standards and selection of materials; strength of materials; inspection 
trips of illustrative construction. 

c. Management: Study of professional ethics; visits to architectural offices; dis- 
cussions with prime consultants in architectural practice. 

Laboratory fee required. Staff 

Architecture 401a, 402b. Principles of Architecture (6-18-12, each sem). 

a. Design: Advanced design problems of complex nature— multistory buildings 
and groups of buildings; philosophy and theory of design; development of 
personal technique and expression in communicative media. 

b. Technology: Further study of capabilities and limitations of building ma 
terials; shop testing of experimental structures; principles of special-purpose 
structural shapes; full integration of construction methods, systems, and ser- 
vices; principles of specifications. 

c. Management: Legal aspects of practice; management and supervision of con- 
struction; client interviews and programming; project presentation techniques; 
professional internships. 

Laboratory fee required. Staff 

Architecture 499a, 499b. Preceptorship B Program 

Selected students spend the entire year working and studying in the offices of their 
Preceptors. 

Architecture 501a, 502b. Principles of Architecture (6-21-13, each sem.). 

a. Design: Institutional and urban planning problems, high-rise buildings, land- 
scape planning; design-theory seminars; basic design studies. 

b. Technology: Comparative structural systems; basic methods of research; in- 
dependent experimentation in materials and structures; seminars with allied 
consultants— estimators appraisers, contractors, insurance specialists, special 
equipment consultants. 

c. Management: Office management and operation; purpose of professional or- 
ganizations; registration laws and procedures; professional ethics; place of ad- 
vanced study and travel in the development of the architect. 

Laboratory fee required. Staff 



118 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Architecture 601a, 602b. (8-15-13, each sem.). 

Independent investigations in architecture culminating in preparation and pres- 
entation of a master's thesis. Laboratory fee required. 

Staff Specialists, University Staff 



Art 

{See pages 189-190) 

Behavioral Sciences 

Undergraduate Program. The major in behavioral science centers 
on a nucleus of courses in anthropology, psychology, and sociology. 
The student will ordinarily emphasize one of these three nuclear 
fields. Instruction in related fields such as political science, economics, 
biology, and history may be substituted with the approval of the ad- 
viser. 

Students majoring in behavioral science will be required to take a 
total of ten semester-courses in anthropology, psychology, and sociol- 
ogy, of which eight must ordinarily be on the Junior and Senior 
level, courses numbered 300 or higher. With the approval of the 
major adviser, a maximum of two semester-courses numbered 300 or 
higher in related fields outside the nuclear fields may be included in 
the major. 

Graduate Program. The Department of Psychology and the Depart- 
ment of Anthropology and Sociology have combined for an interdisci- 
plinary giaduate program in behavioral science. This program is de- 
signed to lead to the doctorate. One foreign language is required, 
and a second language may be required, in accord with the student's 
area of specialization. The doctorate will allow the student to special- 
ize in either anthropology or sociology. In addition to the major em- 
phasis on one of these disciplines, students will be expected to meet 
certain requirements in the other of these two disciplines and in psy- 
chology. The alternatives are therefore: (1) emphasis on anthropol- 
ogy, with minimal requirements in psychology and sociology, or (2) 
emphasis on sociology, with minimal requirements in anthropology 
and psychology. The minimum duration of the program is three 
years. Qualifying examinations testing ability to meet minimal re- 
quirements in all three disciplines must be passed not later than the 
end of the second year. Comprehensive examinations in the discipline 
being emphasized (either anthropology or sociology) must be passed 
before the student undertakes work on the doctoral dissertation. An 
important part of the student's training is involvement in ongoing 
research by members of the faculty. The master's degree will be 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 119 

awarded only in unusual cases. The master's degree will require se- 
lected courses in major and related fields, as approved by an advisor, 
totaling 30 hours. One foreign language is required, a second foreign 
language is optional. A thesis is necessary, 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE COURSES 

Behavioral Science 500a, b. Social Thought and Social Theory (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Critique and analysis of theories of social organization developed by several major 
social scientists (first semester). Consideration of logical and methodological prob- 
lems of theory construction; discussion of differences between evaluative and ex- 
planatory models of society and an investigation of the different levels of theoretical 
generalization possible in social science (second semester). Staff 

Behavioral Science 505. Independent Study and Tutorial (0-0-3 to 9). 

staff 

Behavioral Science 515b. Ethnological Theory (3-0-3). 

A seminar presenting a survey and appraisal of major developments and trends 
of ethnological theory since the beginnings of anthropology as a systematic branch 
of study. Staff 

Behavioral Science 520a. Theory and Problems of Underdeveloped So- 
cieties (3-0-3). 
A study of the characteristics of traditional societies Staff 

Behavioral Science 525b. Theory and Problems of Developing Societies 
(3-0-3). 

A study of characteristics of developing societies. Staff 

Behavioral Science 530a. Behavioral Science Research Methods and 
Techniques (3-0-3). 

Introduction to research strategies of anthropology, sociology and social psy- 
chology. Staff 

Behavioral Science 540b. Behavioral Science Research Methods and 

Techniques (3-0-3). 

Specialized research techniques: interviews, questionnaires, projective techniques, 
tests, etc. Staff 

Behavioral Science 550b. Seminar in Urban Affairs (3-0-3). 

Seminar devoted to research concerned with ecological and cultural influences in 
urban areas. Staff 

Certain undergraduate courses in psychology, anthropology, sociol- 
ogy, and linguistics will be recommended, depending on the back- 
ground of individual students. 

Inter-University African Studies Program 

By arrangement with the University of Houston, Texas Southern 
University, and St. Thomas University in the field of African studies, 
graduate students interested in Africa, may attend courses and obtain 
credit at these other universities. Information of the courses offered 
can be obtained from the chairman of the Psychology Department at 
Rice. 



120 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Anthropology and Sociology 

Professors Goodman, Hole, Norbeck, Chairman 

Assistant Professors Gamst, Harwood, and Martin 

Visiting Assistant Professor Sheldon 

Instructors Hembree and Ingham 

Lecturers Giles and Davidson 

The Undergraduate Major in Anthropology. Students majoring in 
anthropology are required to take a total of ten semester-courses of 
anthropology, eight of v»'hich must be on the Junior and Senior level, 
courses numbered 300 or higher. Anthropology 200a and 201b are 
ordinarily required for all majors. Not more than t^velve semester- 
courses in the major, including courses in the 200 series, are permit- 
ted. With the approval of the departmental adviser, a maximum of 
two semester-courses numbered 300 or higher in related subjects, in- 
cluding certain courses in biology, history, psychology, and sociology, 
may be substituted for courses in anthropology. Linguistics 401a and 
402b are acceptable for credit toward the major in anthropology. 

Graduate Work in Anthropology and Sociology. The Master of 
Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy in Behavioral Science are offered 
under an interdisciplinary program that combines instruction in an- 
thropology, sociology, and psychology. See Behavioral Science, page 
118. 

ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES 

Anthropology 200a. Physical Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Human evolution, fossil man, human genetics, races of man and problems of 
race; the beginnings of culture. Mr. Norbeck 

Anthropology 201b. Introductory Cultural Anthropology (3-0-3). 

Major aspects of culture (social organization, economics, religion); cultural pat- 
terns and sociocultural change; late prehistory of man and the evolution of culture. 

Mr. Gamst 

Anthropology 300a. The Evolution of Culture (3-0-3). 

A consideration of theories and supporting data concerning the evolution of 
culture. Special attention is given to the manner of growth and change of tech 
nology, economic systems, social structure, and religion, and to interrelationships 
of these elements of culture. Mr. Gavisl 

Anthropology 301b. Primitive Religion (3-0-3). 

Comparative survey of religion and magic; the relation of religion and magic to 
other aspects of culture, and their roles with respect to society and the individual. 

Mr. Norbeck 

Antliropology 310a. World Ethnology (3-0-3). 

A survey of selected non-Western societies which illustrate varying modes of 
adaptation to geographical and cultural environments. Not offered in 1968-69. 

Air. Ingham 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 121 

Anthropology 311b. North American Ethnology (3-0-3). 

A general survey of native cultures north of Mexico. Intensive study of selected 
peoples in light of the processes of culture. Not ollered in 1969. Mr. Hole 

Anthropology 320a. Old World Prehistory (3-0-3). 

The origin and development of human culture during the Pleistocene period; 
man's achievement of food production and the beginnings of literate civilizations in 
the Near East. Staff 

Anthropology 321b. New World Prehistory (3-0-3). 

Man's entry into the Americas; his dispersal with varied ecological adaptations 
over the continent; the attainment of civilized societies in Meso-America and 
Peru. Not offered in 1969. Mr. Hole 

Anthropology 325a. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3-0-3). 

A survey of native and European derived cultures of Mexico, Central America, 
and South America, including historical backgrounds and modern problems. 

Mr. Ingham 

Anthropology 330a. Early Civilizations (3-0-3). 

The growth and characteristics of civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, 
Meso-America, and Peru are examined historically and comparatively. Not offered 
in 1968-69. Mr. Hole 

Anthropology 331b. Culture Contact (3-0-3). 

Descriptions of intercultural contact are examined to determine conditions under 
which cultural change, assimilation, integration, interdependence, or exclusion may 
occur. Not offered in 1969. Sta[] 

Anthropology 345b. Peasant Societies and Cultures (3-0-3). 

Ethnological survey of origins and distribution of Old Word peasantries and 
study of representative modern groups emphasizing rural urban relations and cul- 
tural dynamics. Mr. Ingham 

Anthropology 350a. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3-0-3). 

Ethnological study of peoples and cultures of the Middle East, emphasizing 
Arabic-speaking societies and including Turkey, Iran, and minority groups of the 
Arabic world. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Gamut 

Antluropology 351b. Peoples and Cultures of Africa (3-0-3). 

Ethnology of Africa, emphasizing the peoples and cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. 

Mr. Gamst 

Anthropology 360a. Culture and Personality (3-0-3). 

A consideration of theories, methods, and findings in the cross-cultural study of 
the relationships between personality and culture; mental health in cross-cultural 
perspective. Mrs. Goodman 

Anthropology 380a. Peoples and Cultures of Asia (3-0-3). 

Survey of the Far East, emphasizing traditional cultures of Siberia, China, Japan, 
Tibet, and Southeast Asia, and their relationships. Mrs. Goodman 

Anthropology 381b. The Study of Cities (3-0-3). 

Comparative study of cities in widely separated areas of the world, identifying 
constants and major variables of urban culture, ancient, recent, and modern. 

Mrs. Goodman 

Anthropology 385b. History and Culture of Japan (3-0-3). 

A general survey of Japanese culture from its beginnings that emphasizes social 
and other major cultural changes of modern times. Interpretations of the processes 



122 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

of sociocultural change involved are presented in a context of anthropological 
theory that makes use of camparisons with circumstances in other societies and 
nations of the world. Offered in alternate years. To be taught in 1969. 

Anthropology 390b. Value Systems (3-0-3), 

Study of value categories; comparative study of systems of values, and their im- 
plications for behavior, in selected folk and sophisticated cultures. Mrs. Goodman 

Anthropology 400a. Ethnological Theory (3-0-3). 

A seminar presenting a survey and appraisal of major developments and trends 
of ethnological theory since the beginnings of anthropology as a systematic branch 
of study. Approval of instructor required for enrollment. StaQ 

Anthropology 401b. Kinship and Social Structure (3-0-3). 

A seminar presenting an historical, analytic, and interpretive treatment of eth- 
nological data and concepts concerned with kinship and the social structure of 
human societies. Approval of instructor required for enrollment. Not offered in 
1969. Mr. Nor beck 

Anthropology 404a, 405b. Independent Study (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Directed reading and preparation of written papers on anthropological subjects 
not offered in the curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses are 
offered. Conducted for graduate students as tutorial courses with no formal class 
meetings. Students seeking admission must secure approval of the department. 

Staff 

Anthropology 599b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science. 

Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Master of Arts in 
Behavioral Science. 

Anthropology 699b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science. 

Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in Behavioral Science. 

The Undergraduate Major in Sociology. The goals in sociology are 
to acquaint the student with the nature of group behavior, social re- 
lations, and in the broadest sense, the structure of society. Students 
majoring in sociology are required to take a total of ten semester- 
courses in sociology, including Sociology 200a, 201b, and 420b. In the 
summer between the Junior and Senior year, each student is encour- 
aged to gain experience in a foreign culture, particularly a non-West- 
ern society. In the Senior year, each student will write a thesis repre- 
senting a piece of original research. 

SOCIOLOGY COURSES 

Sociology 200a. Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the scientific study of society. The course will examine basic 
theories concerning the nature of society and the individual's relationship to his 
social world. Mr. McCord 

Sociology 201b. American Social Problems (3-0-3). 

An examination of the causes and treatment of certain American social problems: 
crime, alcoholism, mental disorder, and ethnic conflict. Mr. McCord 

Sociology 300a. Social Stratification (3-0-3). 

A study of the division of societies into classes, estates, and castes. Social mobility, 
the distribution of social power, and the relation of ethnic groups to class structure 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 123 

prestige and esteem. The method of research into stratification. Analysis of studies 
of the American class system. StafJ 

Sociology 301b. American Ethnic Groups (3-0-3). 

Survey of major ethnic groups of which the population of the U.S. is composed. 
Social, cultural, and religious factors. The processes of cooperation, conflict, and as- 
similation as they relate to nationality groups. Immigration as a factor in American 
society. Staff 

Sociology 304a, 305b. Independent Study (0-0-3, each sem.) 

Directed reading and preparation of written papers on sociological subjects not 
offered in the regular curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses 
are offered. Conducted as tutorial courses with no formal class meetings. Students 
seeking admission must secure approval of the department. Staff 

Sociology 310a. Social Change (3-0-3). 

A study of the processes of social change from the perspectives of leading theorists. 
Patterns and differential rates of change. Human motivations, political factors, policy 
making and planning in social development. Social change as a local and world 
phenomenon. Staff 

Sociology 311b. Collective Behavior (3-0-3). 

A study of the nature, origin, and development of social groups: crowds, mobs, 
publics, cults and sects; conditions of social unrest, collective excitement, and panic; 
public opinion, reform movements, fashions and fads; the origin and reorganization 
of institutions, values, and societies. Staff 

Sociology 315a. Social Thought and Social theory, I (3-0-3). 

Emphasis will be placed on the critique and analysis of theories of social organi- 
zation developed by several major social scientists. Mr. Harwood 

Sociology 316b. Social Thought and Social Theory, II (3-0-3). 

Consideration of the logical and methodological problems of theory construction; 
discussion of differences between evaluative and explanatory models of society and 
an investigation of the different levels of theoretical generalization possible in social 
science. Mr. Harwood 

Sociology 325a. Urban Social and Political Change (3-0-3). 

This course will explore historical changes in the political organizations of 
American cities and the relationship of these changes to alterations in the ethnic, 
racial, and class composition of cities. Mr. Harwood 

Sociology 330b. Social Philosophy (3-0-3). 

A seminar devoted to an examination of issues in contemporary sociology, in- 
cluding those concerned with physologism, behaviorism, positivism, and historicism. 

Staff 

Sociology 400b. Seminar on the Foundations of Social Thinking (3-0-3). 

The development of sociological thought through the integration of contribu- 
tions from biology, philosphy, anthropology, and other social sciences. Special em- 
phasis is given to the culture concept, social values and social institutions, and the 
social process in relation to problems of social disorganization and adjustment. 

Mr. Giles 

Sociology 404a, 405b. Independent Study (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Directed reading and preparation of written papers on sociological subjects not 
offered in the regular curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses 
are offered. Conducted for graduate students as tutorial courses with no formal class 
meetings. Students seeking admission must secure approval of the department. 

Staff 



124 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Sociology 410a. Social Change in Developing Areas (3-0-3). 

A seminar devoted to a consideration of the relation between social, political, 
and economic change in such nations as India, Egypt, Nigeria, and Indonesia. A 
critical review of basic theories. Approval of instructor required for enrollment. 

Mr. McCord 

Sociology 415b. Industrial Social Structure and Culture (3-0-3). 

This course will focus attention on the economic and political preconditions of 
Western industrial societies and attempt to give some understanding of the unique 
characteristics of modern industrial social organization and culture. Mr. Harwood 

Sociology 419a. Communities (3-0-3). 

An analysis of the structure, processes, and organization of contemporary towns 
and cities. The nature and varieties of community. Consideration is given to the 
phenomena of urbanism and of community cohesion. Methods and cases of com- 
munity research. Staff 

Sociology 420b. Field Methods (3-0-3). 

Research projects in sociology undertaken by advanced students, singly or in 
teams, will serve as a focus for discussion of research methods. Approval of in- 
structor required for enrollment. Staj] 

Sociology 425b. Political Sociology (3-0-3). 

A seminar devoted to an examination of the social basis of political behavior. 

Mr. Harwood 

Sociology 498a, 499b. Research and Thesis in Sociology (0-0-3, each 

sem.). 

Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
Sociology. Staff 

Sociology 599b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science. 

Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
Behavioral Science. 

Sociology 699b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science. 

Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
Behavioral Science. 



Psychology 



Professors Howell, Hudson, Price-Williams, Chairman, and Wann 

Associate Professor Schum 

Assistant Professors DuCharme, McGinnis, and Ramirez 

Students planning to major in psychology should take two courses 
during the Sophomore year, Psychology 200a, 205b. Majors are ex- 
pected to take ten semester-courses in addition. Psychology 325a, b 
and Psychology 340a, b are obligatory for majors. Psychology 200a 
and 305b are open to nonmajors. 

COURSES 

Psychology 200a. Survey of Psychology (3-0-3). 

A survey of the fields of psychology and an introduction to its main theoretical 
issues. Mr. Price-Williams 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 125 

Psychology 205b. Social Aspects of General Psychology (3-0-3), 

An advanced extension of the work covered in the introductory course. Individ- 
ual and social aspects of psychological processes in motivation, learning, perception, 
thought, and language. Staff 

Psychology 305b. An Introduction to the Concepts and Techniques of 

Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

Social processes and relations between individuals and groups. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 200a and 205b. Staff 

Psychology 325a. Statistics and Research Design (3-0-3). 

The primary purpose of this course is to provide the background in probability 
theory necessary for an understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics. Among 
the topics discussed are: the language of sets as applied to probability theory, 
probability as a measure, discrete and continuous random variables, some common 
probability distributions, mathematical expectation, and descriptive indices of 
central tendency, variability, and association. Also discussed are research design and 
measurement problems peculiar to the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: Psychology 
200a and 205b. Mr. Schum 

Psychology 325b. Advanced Statistics and Research Design (3-0-3). 

This course provides an introduction to the inferential techniques of hypothesis 
testing and point and interval estimation. Special empliasis is placed upon analysis 
of variance techniques. Also discussed are problems in regression and correlation. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 200a and 205b, 325a. Mr. Schum 

Psychology 330a. Differential Psychology (3-0-3). 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the techniques for 
measuring individual differences. Critical reviews will be made of various thories 
of individual differences in intelligence and personality. Prerequisite: Psychology 
200a and 205b. Mr. Wann 

Psychology 330b. Personality Theory (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the concepts and techniques of personality study. A con- 
tinuation of Psychology 330a, which is a prerequisite. Mr. Wann 

Psychology 340a. Experimental Psychology (3-4-4). 

An introduction to laboratory methods of research in the areas o£ sensation, 
perception, and learning. Prerequisite; Psychology 200a and 201b. Mr. McGinnis 

Psychology 340b. Advanced Experimental Psychology (3-4-4). 

An advanced course in psychological research using humans and animals with 
particular reference to psychological theory. Emphasis is placed upon the design 
and execution by the student of exploratory studies. Prerequisite: Psychology 200a 
and 205b, 340a. Mr. McGinnis 

Psychology 351a. Sensory Psychology (3-0-3). 

Phenomena, methods, and theory in sensory psychology. Special emphasis on 
vision and audition. Prerequisite: Psychology 200a and 205b. Mr. Schum 

Psychology 361a. Contemporary Issues in Psychological Research 
(3-0-3). 

A survey of (a) major viewpoints concerning the planning, design, and execution 
of psychological research, (b) major substantive areas of research, and (c) ethics and 
values in research. Prerequisite: Psychology 200a and 205b. Mr. Willems 

Psychology 400a. Learning (3-0-3). 

Selected topics in learning theory and supporting data. Emphasis on newer 
mathematical models and related attempts to account for human and animal learn- 
ing phenomena in a quantitative manner. Approval of instructor required for en- 
rollment. Mr. McGinnis 



126 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY' 

Psychology 400b. Advanced General Psychology (3-0-3). 

An atlempt to derive a set of basic principles of psychology as a unified discipline. 
Emphasis will be on the reconciliation of conflicting theoretical orientations. Ap- 
proval of instructor required for enrollment. Messrs. Hudson and Price-Williams 

Psychology 410a. Development Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

The course presents three major topics: adolescence, comparative social psychol- 
ogy, and theories and problems of social psychology. The first semester is designed 
to acquaint the student, from the point of view of adolescence, with the physical, 
social, and emotional processes that go into the making of an adult. Approval of 
instructor required for enrollment. Mr. Wann 

Psychology 410b. Developmental Social Psychology (3-0-3). 

The second semester is a continuation of the above topics, giving greater em- 
phasis to social processes. These are viewed from the vantage point of comparative 
social psychology and the wide varieties of behaviors possible for human beings 
and from the points of view provided by alternative theories. Approval of instructor 
required for enrollment. Mr. Wann 

Psychology 415a. History and Theories of Psychology (3-0-3). 

A review of the development of Western scientific psychology and the emergence 
of theoretical systems. Approval of instructor required for enrollment. Mr. Hudson 

Psychology 452b. Engineering Psychology (3-0-3). 

A survey of research on those aspects of human behavior which are relevant to the 
design of man machine systems. The course includes discussions of the capabilities 
and limitations of man as a sensor and interpreter of information-carrying signals, as 
a processor of discrete and continuous information, and as a decision-maker. Also 
discussed are applications of statistical decision theory, information theory, and 
servo-mechanism theory in the study of human behavior. Approval of instructor 
required for enrollment. Mr. Schum 

Psychology 462b. Psychological Ecology (3-0-3). 

A complement to Experimental Psychology and supplement to Contemporary 
Issues in Psychological Research, this course will survey the rationale, research prob- 
lems, and methods for studying behavior in its natural, everyday habitat. Approval 
of instructor required for enrollment. Mr. Willems 

Psychology 490a, b. Independent Study and Research (3-0-3, each sem.). 
Approval of instructor required for enrollment. StaQ 

Psychology 599a, b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science (Vari- 
able credit.) 
Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 

Behavioral Science. Sta^ 

Psychology 699a, b. Research and Thesis in Behavioral Science (Vari- 
able credit). 
Research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 

Behavioral Science. StaQ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 127 



Biology 



Professors Awapara, Read, Chairman, Storck, Subtelny, Talmage, 

AND J. B. Walker 

Associate Professors Campbell, Elbein, F. Fisher, Karakashian, 

Philpott, and Ward 

Assistant Professors Ansevin, Eisenberg, and J. Palka 

Lecturer Pulley 

Undergraduate Program. A major in biology may be taken in the 
humanities (academic) or the science-engineering program (see pages 
53-59). The science-engineering program is strongly recommended. All 
majors are required to take introductory courses in physics and math- 
ematics, Chemistry 120a, Biology 201a,b, and organic chemistry. It is 
recommended that majors who plan to enter graduate school take at 
least two years of German. In addition to Biology 201a,b, the depart- 
ment requires satisfactory completion of Biology 301a,b, Biology 
303a, 304a, 305b, and at least four semesters of additional advanced 
work in biology. 

Biochemistry Major. An interdepartmental major in biochemistry 
is offered in conjunction with the Department of Chemistry. The 
program of students wishing to elect this major must be approved by 
both departments. 

Special Projects in Biology: Qualified biology majors are encour- 
aged to undertake a research problem under the supervision of a fac- 
ulty adviser. Such students may substitute Biology 400a,b for two ad- 
vanced semester-courses during the Senior year. Funds are also avail- 
able to support summer research by qualified undergraduate students. 
For more complete information concerning these programs, consult 
with members of the department staff. 

Graduate Program. Open to qualified applicants who hold a bache- 
lor's degree or equivalent in one of the natural sciences or engineer- 
ing. Prospective graduate students are advised to take the Graduate 
Record Examination before applying, or as soon thereafter as practi- 
cable. 

The following areas of specialization are currently offered in biol- 
ogy: biochemistry, cell biology, general physiology, genetics, inverte- 
brate and vertebrate physiology, microbiology, symbiosis and parasit- 
ism, and environmental biology. 

Program for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

(a) Usually four or more years of graduate study with at least the 
last two years at Rice University. 

(b) At least thirty-six semester-hours of graduate courses in biologi- 



128 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

cal and related sciences other than thesis work, of which at least 
three must be taken at Rice University. 

(c) Completion of an original investigation worthy of publication in 
a recognized scientific journal, and the submission of a doctoral 
thesis as described on page 102. 

(d) Satisfactory evidence of competence in a foreign language to be 
specified by the department. 

(e) Satisfactory performance in a written and/or oral examination 
administered by the department. 

(f) An oral examination in defense of the thesis during the last year 
of residence. 

The Degree of Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may 
be obtained after two years of graduate study upon the successful 
completion of the language requirement, twenty-four semester-hours 
of graduate courses, satisfactory work in a written examination, and 
the acceptance of a thesis embodying the results of original investiga- 
tion, in defense of which an oral examination is taken. The taking of 
this degree is not required as a prerequisite for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy and may be omitted with the approval of the depart- 
mental staff. 

Assistantships. Financial assistance in the form of graduate fellow- 
ships, predoctoral fellowships, research assistantships, and scholarships 
is available. All graduate students in biology are expected to engage 
in laboratory instruction regardless of appointment. Graduate stu- 
dents are assigned to different courses from year to year to obtain the 
maximum benefit from this phase of training. 

COURSES 

A. Courses for Students Not Concentrating in Biology 
The following course is offered for those students needing a prelimi- 
nary course in the field. This course is not applicable to a major in 
biology. 

Biology 100a, b. General Biology (3-3-4, each sem.). 

In this terminal course emphasis will be placed on the methods of science, the 
mechanisms of growth, metaliolism, and heredity, and the concept of organic evolu- 
tion. The laboratory work will include demonstrations and selected experimentation. 

Staff 



B. Biology Courses for Those Concentrating in Biology 

Biology 201a, b. Introduction to Biology (3-3-4, each sem.). 

A general introductory cotirse dealing with the basic principles of biology. The 
first semester will be devoted mainly to subcellular plienomena, followed by con- 
sideration of cell organization, differentiation, organ and organismal function, popu- 
lation phenomena, and evolution. This course is a prerequisite for advanced courses 
in biology. Concurrent registration in Chemistry 200a,b is recommended. Prere- 
quisite: Chemistry 120a,b or equivalent. Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 129 

Biology 301a, b. Organismal Biology (3-3-4, each sem.). 

The evolution, systematics, and zoogeography of the invertebrates and verte- 
brates, with a consideration of their comparative morphology, physiology, and be- 
havior as related to adaptation for aquatic, terrestrial, and aerial habitats. This 
course is required for biology majors. Prerequisite: Biology 201a,b. Laboratory fee 
required. Staff 

Biology 303a. Introduction to Biological Chemistry (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the chemistry, biodegradation and biosynthesis of cell con- 
stituents. Mechanisms of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and energy yielding reactions 
in the cell are discussed. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry (Chem. 200). Mr.Awapara 

Biology 304a. Laboratory in Biological Chemistry (0-3-1). 

This laboratory introduces the student to some simple procedures used in the 
extraction of proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides from biological materials. 
Also introduces the student to the analysis of enzyme catalyzed reactions and their 
kinetics. Required for biology majors. Mr. Awapara 

Biology 305b. Cell Physiology (3-34). 

The detailed analysis of cell function. Required for biology majors. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 200a,b.; Biology 303a, and general physics. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. Palka 

Biology 360a. Marine Biology (3-3-4). 

A study of the marine and estuarine environments with particular attention to 
the local fauna. Laboratory will include weekend field trips. Class is limited to 
fifteen students. Prerequisite: A course in invertebrate zoology or invertebrate 
paleontology. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Pulley 

Biology 400a, b. Special Problems and Honors Work (2-6-4, each sem.). 

Open only to Senior biology majors and with permission of the chairman of the 
department. For use primarily in honors programs. Staff 

Biology 405b. Plant Physiology (3-3-4). 

The cellular and organismal physiology of selected plant types. Attention will be 
given to nutrition, metabolism, growth, and physiological interactions with environ- 
ment. Prerequisite: Biology 201, 301a,b, 303a, 305b. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. Ward 

Biology 410b. Genetics (3-3-4). 

Topics considered include the composition and organization of the genetic 
material, recombination and mutation, function of the gene, and the role of genetic 
variability in evolving populations. The complementary roles of genetic and bio- 
chemical methodologies are stressed. Air. Karakashian 

Biology 415a. Botany (3-3-4). 

A comparative study of plants as viewed through physiology and evolution. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 201a,b. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Pulley 

Biology 420a. Parasitism and Symbiosis (3-34). 

An introduction to the biology of symbiosis, with special emphasis on the physi- 
cochemical relationships between organisms. Illustrative examples demonstrating 
principles are drawn from the plant or animal kingdoms. Prerequisite: Biology 
301a,b and 303a, 305b. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Read 

Biology 425a. Concepts of Nervous System Functions (3-3-4). 

A variety of approaches to the study of nervous systems is developed, ranging from 
studies of single neurons to the behavior of whole animals. There is strong emphasis 
on laboratory work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; understanding of resting 
and action potentials at the level presented in Biology 305b is assumed. Limited 
to 12 students; may be taken for graduate credit. Mr. Palka 



130 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Biology 430b. Population Ecology (3-3-4). 

A theoretical and experimental approach to the study of populations. Stress will 
be placed on quantitative approaches to current concepts and problems. Topics to 
be considered include intra- and interspecific relationships and community struc- 
ture. Prerequisites: Biology 301a,b, 303a, 305b. Mr. Eisenberg 

Biology 440a. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology (3-3-4). 

A consideration of the concept of biochemical unity as it relates to the origin 
of life and the establishment of metabolism and information transfer. Subsequent 
evolution and biological diversity are considered as logical extensions of this con- 
cept. Weekly student seminars are held on current and/or pertinent literature. 
Laboratory consists of special projects designed to illustrate techniques used in the 
study of invertebrate biochemistry. Prerequisite: Biology 303a, 305b. Laboratory fee 
required. Afr. Campbell 

Biology 445a. Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (3-3-4). 

Studies of the physiology of organ systems. Homeostatic capacities of individual 
organ systems with their comparative function in various vertebrate groups will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite: Biology 301a,b and 303a. Permission of instructor. Labora- 
tory fee required. Staf) 

Biology 450b. Developmental Biology (3-3-4). 

An analysis of developmental processes in the animal organism from fertilization 
to the elaboration of its final form. Emphasis will be placed on induction and cell 
differentiation. Organogenesis, metamorphosis, regeneration, and other develop- 
mental phenomena will be discussed. The laboratory work will concern observation 
and experimental analysis of development in amphibian and avian embryos. Labora- 
tory fee required. Mrs. Ansevin 

Biology 460b. Advanced Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

A detailed study of the integrated networks of enzymatic reactions characteristic 
of living cells of man and microbes. Emphasis is placed on the nature and 
characteristics of enzymatic catalysis, pathways involved in the biosynthesis of cell 
constituents, and mechanisms responsible for coordinating the rates of hundreds 
of simultaneous enzymatic reactions. Prerequisite: Biology 303a or consent of 
instructor. Mr. Walker 

Biology 465b. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (1-8-3). 

A laboratory course emphasizing procedures involved in answering specific bio- 
chemical questions. Students are assigned research projects after they have become 
acquainted with general characteristics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Laboratory 
fee required. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Walker 

Biology 470a. General Microbiology (3-34). 

A study of microorganisms, including Protozoa, algae, fungi, bacteria, and viruses. 
Special attention will be given to the bacteria. Lectures will be concerned with 
evolution, classification, growth, nutrition, and metabolism. Prerequisites: Biology 
301a,b and 3U3a, 305b. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Elbein 

Biology 475a. Cells and Tissues (3-3-4). 

Study of the morphology and function of cell components, cells, and tissues, as 
revealed by light and electron microscopy and associated histo- and cytochemical 
methods. Laboratory work in histology and histochemistry. Prerequisite: Biology 
303a, 305b, or its equivalent. Laboratory fee is required. Mr. Philpott 

Biology 480a. Endocrinology (3-3-4). 

Study of the primary endocrine glands of mammals and their relationships to 
the physiological homeostasis of the mammal. While emphasis is placed on the 
function, morphology, and interrelationships of the glands of internal secretion of 
mammals, the comparative anatomy and evolution of these glands in the verte- 
brates is discussed. Laboratory work is restricted primarily to histological study of 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 131 

the glands, surgical procedures, and simple experiments demonstrating hyposecre- 
tion. Prerequisite: Biology 303a. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Talmage 

Biology 500. Biology Seminar (1-0-2). 

Held weekly to hear papers on current research by members of the staff, visiting 
investigators, and advanced graduate students. Attendance by graduate students in 
biology is required. Visitors and undergraduates are invited. Stafj 

Biology 509. Biology of Macromolecules (3-3-4). 

Study of structure, metabolism and function of the nucleic acids and certain 
other cell molecular components. Mr. Storck 

Biology 510a, b. Topics in Biochemistry (3-0-3). 

Messrs. Awapara and Walker 

Biology 514a. Biosynthesis of Natural Products (3-0-3). 

A study of mechanisms of biosynthesis of complex substances of current interest 
in biology. Prerequisite: Biology 460b or consent of instructor. Mr. Walker 

Biology 516b. Proteins and Amino Acids (3-0-3). 

A study of the metabolism of proteins and amino acids. Some attention will be 
given to methods of protein isolation and characterization. Prerequisite: Biology 
460b. Mr. Awapara 

Biology 520. Advanced Cell Physiology (3-0-3). 

A seminar on current literature and research in cell physiology. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. Mr. Campbell 

Biology 521. Advanced Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 
(3-0-3). 

Offered in 1967-68 and in alternate years thereafter. A seminar on current litera- 
ture and research in comparative biochemistry and biochemical evolution. Prerequi- 
site: Biology 440b and graduate standing. Mr. Campbell 

Biology 540. Cell Biology (2-6-4). 

Instruction in methods for studying cells and cell phenomena and in interpreta- 
tion of observations. Laboratory work will involve the practice and application of 
techniques to cell biology. Seminar work will focus on recent work on morphology, 
function, and biochemistry of cells. Prerequisite: Biology 303a, 305b (or equivalent) 
and Biology 475a. Mr. Philpott 

Biology 541. Topics in Cell Biology (3-0-3). 
Biology 545a. Seminar in Tissue Culture (2-0-2). 

Review of significant applications of tissue culture methods in biological re- 
search. Mrs. Ansevin 

Biology 546a. Tissue Culture Techniques (0-6-2). 

The laboratory course will offer practical experience with several basic tissue 
culture techniques and work on a special project of special interest to the student. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and concurrent registration in Biology 545. 

Mrs. Ansevin 

Biology 550. Topics in Microbiology (3-0-3). 

Mr. Elbein 

Biology 560. Physiology of Parasitism (3-0-3). 

Conferences, student reports, and laboratory work on the physiology of parasites 
and the functional relationships of hosts and parasites. Attention will be given to 



Mr. Philpott 



132 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

growth, metabolism, nutrition, and physiological evolution of parasites, with em- 
phasis on comparative aspects. The basis of pathology and disease will be treated 
as a series of physiochemical problems, with examples drawn from the animal or 
plant kingdom. Mr. Read 

Biology 561. Topics in Symbiology (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years with Biology 560. Mr. Read 

Biology 570. Arthropod Physiology (3-0-3). 

Readings, conferences, and student reports on current literature concerned with 
the physiology of arthropods. Special emphasis will be placed on the insects. 

Mr. Fisher 

Biology 571. Invertebrate Endocrinology (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years with Biology 570. Consideration of current literature 
dealing with endocrine mechanisms in invertebrates. Mr. Fisher 

Biology 580. Seminar in Endocrinology I (3-0-3). 

The thyroid, pancreas, adrenals, and the relationships of hormones to carbohy- 
drate metabolism are studied. Reading seminar on current literature in endo- 
CTinology. Mr. Talmage 

Biology 581. Seminar in Endocrinology II (3-0-3). 

The parathyroids, the pituitary, and the physiology of reproduction. Readings, 
conferences, and laboratory work. Includes also a weekly seminar on current litera- 
ture in endocrinology. Mr. Talmage 

Biology 590b. Instrumental Methods in Biology (34-4). 

The basic theory and operation of modem instruments used in the quantitative 
study of living matter at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Emphasis 
will be placed on methods having wide application, such as use of radioactive and 
stable isotopes, spectrophotometry, sedimentation, diffusion, viscosity, bioelectrical 
measurement, and electrophoresis. Attention will be given to limitations of metlioas 
and signihcance of the results obtainable. Prerequisites: At least one previous course 
in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. Storck and Mr. Talmage 

Biology 599. Topics in Genetics (3-0-3). 

Study of current literature in the broad areas of chemical genetics, microbial 
genetics, protein synthesis, differentiation, and mutation. It is held in collaboration 
with geneticists from other universities in Houston. Mr. Karakashian 

Biology 600. Graduate Research. 

stag 



Business Administration 

{See pages 144-151) 



Chemical Engineering 

{See pages 157-161) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 133 

Chemistry 

Professors Curl, Franklin, Kilpatrick, E. S. Lewis, Margrave, 

Chairman, Pitzer, Richter, Salsburg, Sass, and Turner 

Assistant Professors Brooks, Cantrell, Gansow, Glass, 

Haug, Hayes, Magid, and Stevens 

The Undergraduate Program. Undergraduates electing chemistry as 
a major are expected to satisfy the requirements of the science-engi- 
neering program set forth on pages 56-59, In general they will take 
Chemistry 200a,b in the Sophomore year in place of one of the speci- 
fied electives. It is desirable for chemistry majors who seek admission 
to graduate school, but who do not possess advanced high school lan- 
guage credits, to take two years of German and one year of either 
French or Russian. The department further requires satisfactory com- 
pletion of the following courses: 

Junior Year 

Chemistry 310a,b 

Chemistry 400a and Chemistry 401a 

Chemistry 470b 

Mathematics 300a,b 

Senior Year 
Chemistry 460 

Three semesters of approved advanced course work in chemistry. 
Superior students may substitute undergraduate research (Chem- 
istry 490a, b) for one or two semesters of classroom instruction. 

Interdepartmental Majors. Interdepartmental majors are offered in 
biochemistry and chemical physics by the Department of Chemistry 
in conjunction with the Department of Biology and the Department 
of Physics, respectively. Students wishing to elect either of these ma- 
jors must be approved both by the Department of Chemistry and the 
other department concerned. 

The Graduate Program. A student who has completed work equiv- 
alent to that required for the bachelor's degree in chemistry offered 
at Rice University may be admitted to graduate standing. Preference 
is normally given to applicants who earn high scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination, including the advanced test in chemistry (see 
page 101). A minimum of one year of graduate study is required for 
the degree of Master of Arts and at least two years for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts is required to demon- 
strate a reading knowledge of scientific German, French, or Russian. 
He must complete six semesters of course work, present in a thesis 
the results of a program of research approved by the department, and 
pass a final oral examination. 



134 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

To be recommended for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the 
student must complete for publication a thesis which represents a dis- 
tinctly original and significant contribution to the field of chemistry. 
He must possess a reading knowledge of scientific German and of 
scientific French or Russian as a second language. The candidate 
must further have acquired through course work and independent 
study a broad fundamental knowledge of chemistry in addition to 
those areas of the subject encompassed by his own research interests. 
Cumulative examinations for the Ph.D. degree are given periodically 
and a final oral examination on the thesis is required for all candi- 
dates. 

COURSES 

Chemistry 120a, b. Introductory and Analytical Chemistry (3-3-4, each 

sem.). 

A general introductory course dealing with the basic phenomena and principles 
of chemistry. The laboratory work in the first semester includes volumetric and 
gravimetric methods of quantitative analysis. The second deals with the funda- 
mentals and methods of qualitative analysis. The course is required of science 
engineering students, and is also open to academic majors. Prerequisite: High 
school chemistry. Laboratory fee required. 

Chemistry 200a, b. Organic Chemistry 3-4-4, each sem.). 

The course is designed to give a thorough survey of aliphatic and aromatic 
chemistry with an introduction to the heterocyclic compounds, and to present the 
theories relating to their structure and reactions. The course is divided into two 
sections. One section is intended primarily for chemistry majors and those who plan 
further organic chemistry courses, the other is especially appropriate for premedical 
students. 

Chemistry 310a, b. Physical Chemistry (3-4-4, each sem.). 

A quantitative study of theoretical and physical chemistry with emphasis on the 
principles of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics. 
Among the topics included are atomic and molecular structure, equilibria, electro- 
chemistry, kinetics, and theory of solutions. The laboratory work consists of one 
four-hour period a week. Prerequisites: Mathematics 200a,b and Physics 210a,b. 

Chemistry 400a. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The course develops, in detail, the concepts of modern organic chemistry. A 
major portion is devoted to reactions of synthetic importance. Chemistry majors 
normally take this course in the Junior year. Prerequisite: Chemistry 200a,b. 

Chemistry 401a. Advanced Organic Laboratory (0-8-2). 

A laboratory course covering the techniques of modern organic chemistry. This 
course is designed to accompany Chemistry 400a. Prerequisite: Chemistry 200a,b. 
Laboratory fee required. 

Chemistry 420b. Statistical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A development of the equilibrium theory of statistical mechanics. Applications 
to imperfect gas theory and the calculation of thermodynamic properties of mole- 
cules are given special attention. Prerequisites: Chemistry 450a, Mathematics 300a,b, 
and Physics 210a,b. 

Chemistry 430a. Quantum Chemistry (3-0-3). 

This course is devoted to a discussion of valence theory and to a consideration 
of structure and reactivity basea upon simple quantum mechanical considerations. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 135 

Chemistry 445b. Physical-Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

In this course, the student develops an understanding of the process by which 
the detailed mechanisms of organic reactions are elucidated. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
310a,b, Chemistry 400a. 

Chemistry 450a. Advanced Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

Relation of heat and work to chemical and physical systems. A consideration of 
free energy, entropy, and other thermodynamic functions as applied to equilibria. 
Special attention to the treatment of solutions. 

Chemistry 460. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

This course will normally be taken by chemistry majors in the Senior year. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 310a. 

Chemistry 470b. Instrumental Methods (3-8-5). 

A required course for Junior chemistry majors. Special emphasis is given to tlie 
principles and applications of modern instrumental methods in the areas of 
inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Laboratory fee required. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 310a. 

Chemistry 480. Chemistry of Natural Products (3-0-3). 

A study of important types of naturally occurring substances of current interest 
in chemistry and biology. Prerequisite: Chemistry 400a. 

Chemistry 490a, b. Special Study and Research for Undergraduates 
(Credit to be determined). 

Open only to chemistry majors with superior records, and with the permission of 
the chairman of the department. Laboratory fee required. 

Chemistry 500a, b. Graduate Research (Credit to be determined). 

Chemistry 505a, b. Advanced Physical Chemistry (4-0-4, each sem.). 

An intensive review of general physical chemistry with emphasis on independent 
work by the student. A course designed primarily for first-yar graduate students. 

Chemistry 510a, b. Chemistry of the Steroids (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A consideration of the reactions and stereochemistry of the steroids, including a 
discussion of the physiological importance of these compounds. Not offered in 
1967-68. 

Chemistry 520a, b. Kinetics of Reactions of Gases (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A treatment from both theoretical and empirical considerations of chemical 
reactions in gases, including some studies of fast reactions catalyzed by solids. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 505a,b or equivalent. Not offered in 1967-68. 

Chemistry 530a. Chemistry of Gaseous Ions (2-0-2). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 505a,b. 

Chemistry 540-544a, b. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Chemistry 550a. Reaction Kinetics and Mechanisms in Solutions 

(3-0-3). 

A consideration of the rates of reactions with emphasis on homogeneous kinetics 
as a tool in the study of reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 400a. Not 
offered in 1967-68. 

Chemistry 560a, b. Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-0-3, each sem.). 
The course deals with organic reaction mechanisms, modern structure theory 



136 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

and synthetically important reactions. It is designed primarily for first-year graduate 
students. 

Chemistry 563. Introduction to the Solid State (3-0-3). 

This course will provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts about 
crystalline solids, and provide the basic preparation for further courses in the 
sec]uence Chemistry 564-567. It will consist of the following: a brief review of 
Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics, a discussion of crystal structure, 
a study of the diffraction of waves by lattices and an introduction to the concept 
of the reciprocal lattice, classical and quantum-mechanical descriptions of lattice 
vibrations and the thermal properties of insulators, and the properties of electrons 
in solids including free-electron and band-theoretical approaches. Prerequisites: 
An introductory background in wave mechanics and statistical mechanics, and con- 
current enrollment in a graduate level quantum mechanics course is assumed. Also 
listed under same number in Departments of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering and Physics. 

Chemistry 564. Electron Transport and Superconductivity (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Chemistry 563. It will consider various aspects of electron transport, 
primarily from a microscopic viewpoint. Among topics to be covered will be various 
contributions to electron scattering and some techniques for measuring the Fermi 
Surface. In addition, an introduction to superconductivity will be presented. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 563 or equivalent. Also listed under same number in 
Departments of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Chemistry 565. Dielectric and Optical Properties of Matter (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Chemistry 563. Topics included are: polarization and the static model 
of a dielectric medium in an electric field; extension of the above model to the 
dynamic case and dielectric dispersion in solids; Raman and Brillouin scattering; 
Optical spectra of solids; stimulated effects with applications to lasers; the dynamics 
of the nonlinear interaction between radiation and matter. Prerequisites: Chemistry 
563 or equivalent. Also listed under same number in Departments of Electrical 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Chemistry 566. Imperfections and Mechanical Properties (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Chemistry 563. Point defects in crystals, geometrical description of 
dislocations and the mathematical theory of lattice imperfections will be discussed. 
Non-thermal generation of point defects, physical observation of defects in crystals 
and special properties of lattice imperfections in metallic, ionic and homopolar 
crystals will be covered. How lattice imperfections in ionic, metallic and homopolar 
crystals affect certain physical properties of these crystals will be developed. The 
effects of lattice defects, particularly dislocations, upon the mechanical properties 
of crystals will be discussed. Prerequisites: Chemistry 563, or equivalent. Also listed 
under same number in Departments of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing and Physics. 

Chemistry 567. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Chemistry 563. The basis of the magnetic properties of solids will be 
discussed. This will include diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, anti- 
ferromagnetism, and ferrimagnetism. The phenomenon of magnetic resonance will 
be studied. This will include nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic 
resonance, and ferromagnetic resonance. The emphasis will be on the atomic origin 
of magnetism and on a description of the elementary excitations of ordered magnetic 
materials. Prerequisite: Chemistry 563 or equivalent. Also listed under same number 
in Departments of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Chemistry 570a. Spectral Methods in Organic Chemistry (3-0-3). 

The application of infrared, ultraviolet, and nuclear magnetic resonance spec- 
troscopy to organic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 400a. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 137 

Chemistry 580a. Special Topics in Alkaloid Chemistry (3-0-3). 

A consideration of the chemistry of selected groups of alkaloids. Not offered in 
1966-67. 

Chemistry 590a, b. Advanced Topics in Physical and Theoretical Chem- 
istry (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Chemistry 610a. High Temperature Chemistry (3-0-3). 

A study of the techniques for generation and measurement of high temperatures 
and of the nature of high-temperature phenomena utilizing the principles of 
thermodynamics and quantum mechanics and modern experimental tools. Special 
attention is devoted to the characterization of high-temperature vapors, to gas-solid 
interactions, and to plasma phenomena. 

Chemistry 640a. Chemistry of the Terpenes (3-0-3). 
Not offered in 1967-68. 

Chemistry 650a, b. Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of simple mechanical systems from the point of view of wave mechanics 
with application of these concepts to the chemical bond. Consideration of the 
energy states of polyatomic molecules. Prerequisite: Mathematics 300a,b or 310a,b. 

Chemistry 660a. X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis (3-0-3). 

A course in X-ray analysis including experimental methods, symmetry and space 
groups, dynamic theory of X-ray diffraction, Fourier and Patterson methods, 
modification functions, and order-disorder phenomena. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
505a.b. Not offered in 1967-68. 

Chemistry 700. Summer Graduate Research 



Civil Engineering 

(See pages 161-167) 

Classics, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, 
and Spanish 

Professor Levin 

Associate Professors Castaneda, Chairman, Jitkoff and 

Leal de Martinez 

Assistant Professors Lendinez, Skarginsky, and Urrutibeheity 

Instructors Charles and Green 

Lecturer Moore 

Work is offered in Greek, Latin, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and 
Spanish. Undergraduate majors are presently offered in Classical 
Studies and Spanish. 

A fully equipped language laboratory is now in operation, and lab- 
oratory work is required of students in the beginning classes in all 
the modern languages. 



138 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Qualified upperclassmen may engage in independent work at the 
discretion of the department. 



CLASSICS 

Professor Levin 

Instructor Charles 

Lecturer Moore 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in Classical Studies. A 
major in Classical Studies is presently offered with the cooperation of 
the Departments of History and Fine Arts. The overall major re- 
quirement is distributed between classical languages and literature (at 
least thirty semester-hours, equal to five year-courses, of which twen- 
ty-four hours, equal to four year-courses, must be at the 300 level or 
above) and relevant courses in fine arts, history, humanities, and phi- 
losophy. Preparation to insure an adequate reading and speaking 
knowledge of at least one modern foreign language is very strongly 
urged. All prospective programs for individuals majoring in Classical 
Studies are to be drawm up in consultation with the members of the 
Classics staff. 

COURSES 

Greek 100a, b. First-Year Greek (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A course designed to develop as rapidly as possible an ability to read simple 
Greek prose: study of grammar, forms, and vocabulary is combined with practice 
in reading. Mr. Charles 

Greek 200a, b. Intermediate Greek (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The course is designed to broaden the skills acquired in Greek 100 through a 
close study of readings which may include a dialogue of Plato, a tragedy, or 
selections from Homer. Mr. Levin 

Greek 300a. Greek poetry (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A selection will be made from the writings of two or more Greek poets, exclusive 
of Homer. Prerequisite: Greek 200a,b or equivalent. Staff 

Greek 300b. Greek Prose (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Readings will be selected from the work of prose authors not already encountered 
in lower-level courses. Prerequisite: same as for Greek 300a. Staff 

Latin 100a, b. First- Year Latin (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Desip^ed for students who have had no previous acquaintance with the Latin 
language. The first semester will be given over to grammatical and syntactic study. 
Selections from several Roman authors will be read during the second semester. 

Mrs. Moore 

Latin 200a, b. Intennediate Latin (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A course designed for students who enter with two or three years of high school 
Latin as well as for those who have successfully completed Latin lOOa.b. Rapid 
review of forms and syntax will be followed by reading of representative selections 
from Latin prose and poetry. Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 139 

Latin 300a. Cicero (3-0-3). 

Several works of Cicero will be read. There will be discussion also of related 
literary and historical topics. Prerequisite: Latin 200a,b or three or four years of 
high school Latin. Mr. Charles 

Latin 300b. Catullus and Horace (3-0-3). 

A study of the development of Latin lyric poetry in Catullus and the Odes and 
Epoclcs of Horace. Consideration will be given to their Greek predecessors, to the 
Roman age that they mirror, and to the standards by which their work may be 
criticized. Mr. Levin 

Latin 410a. Tacitus (3-0-3). 

Readings in the Annals of Tacitus and discussion of some of the historical 
problems of the region of Tiberius. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 
1967-68. Prerequisite: Latin 300 a and b or equivalent. Mr. Levin 

Latin 410b. Lucretius (3-0-3). 

Readings in the De Rerum Natura and discussion of literary and philosophical 
topics. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 1969-70. Prerequisite: Latin 300 
a and b or equivalent. Mr. Charles 

Latin 420a. Elegiac Poetry (3-0-3). 

Readings and discussion of a representative selection of poems by Catullus, 
TibuUus, Propertius, and Ovid. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 1968-69. 
Prerequisite: Latin 300 a and b or equivalent. Mr. Levin 

Latin 420b. Satire (3-0-3). 

Readings and discussion of a representative selection of the work of the Roman 
satirists, both in prose and in verse. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 
1968-69. Prerequisite: Latin 300 a and b or equivalent. Mr. Charles 

Latin 490a, b. Special Topics in Roman Literature (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Independent work for qualified upperclassmen in genres or authors not presented 
in other upper-level courses: may be repeated for credit. Staff 

Classics 315a. Greek Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

A study of the Greek creative achievement in epic and lyric poetry and in drama. 
Open to Sophomores with permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years: 
will be given in 1969-70. Mr. Levin 

Classics 315b. Greek Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

A continuation of the foregoing: Greek historians, orators, philosophers. Open to 
Sophomores with permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years: will be 
given in 1969-70. Mr. Charles 

Classics 316a. Roman Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

Major achievements in dramatic, lyric, and epic poetry will be studied, with due 
attention given both to Greek influence and to Roman originality. No prerequisite, 
although the sequence of 315a, b and 316a, b is strongly recommended. Open to 
Sophomores with permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years: will be 
given in 1968-69. Mr. Charles 

Classics 316b. Roman Literature in Translation (3-0-3). 

A continuation of the foregoing: readings in Roman oratory, historical writing, 
and philosophy. No prerequisite; but note the recommendation made above regard- 
ing Classics 316a. Open to Sophomores with permission of the instructor. Offered in 
alternate years: will be given in 1968-69. Mr. Levin 



140 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Classics 320a, b. Trends in European Culture during Antiquity and 

the Middle Ages (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course traces selected aspects of European thought from Periclean Athens 
to the later Middle Ages, with special reference to Hellenistic and Greco-Roman 
influences. Religious, philosophical, and scientific implications are examined in some 
detail. Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Prerequisite: History 200a. 201 b. 
Also offered as History 320a,b. Mr. Lear 

Classics 430a, b. Topics in Ancient and Medieval Intellectual History 

(3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course deals with selective phases of classical and medieval thought based 
on the cultural monuments of antiquity and the Middle Ages. Intensive reading 
and reports on special aspects of the field. Offered in alternate years: given in 
1969-70. Prerequisite: History 200a, 201b. Also offered as History 430a, b. Mr. Lear 

ITALIAN 

Italian 100a, b. Elementary Italian (3-2-4, each sem.). 

Introduction to the study of the Italian language, with emphasis on the develop- 
ment of audio-lingual skills. Graded readings will be used to introduce the student 
to the basic elements of Italian culture and civilization. Language laboratory work 
required. 5<a^ 

Italian 200a, b. Intermediate Italian (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Emphasis on intensified oral and written practice. Review of grammar. An 
introduction to the culture and civilization of Italy. Readings of contemporary short 
stories and plays. ^^o-d 

PORTUGUESE 
Associate Professor Leal de Martinez 
Portuguese 100a, b. First-Year Portuguese (3-2-4, each sem.). 

Introduction to the study of the Portuguese language, with emphasis on the 
development of audio-lingual skills. Language laboratory work required. 

Mrs. Leal de Martinez 

Portuguese 200a, b. Second-Year Portuguese (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The first part of this course is devoted to a comprehensive review of grammar 
which will gradually lead the student to engage in natural conversation. Con- 
temporary short stories will provide current linguistic models and serve as the 
point of departure for class conversation and discussion. The second part of the 
course is intended to introduce the student to the main currents of Portuguese 
literature, ^^''•s- Lea/ de Martinez 

RUSSIAN 

Associate Professor Jitkoff 
Assistant Professor Skarginsky 

Russian 100a, b. Elementary Russian (3-2-4, each sem.). 

Pronunciation, grammar, introduction to conversation, graded reading, and 
practice in translation. Language laboratory work required. Staf] 

Russian 110a. Russian for Graduate Students (3-0-0). 

A noncredit course in Russian, restricted to graduate students preparing for the 
graduate language examination. Mr. Jitkoff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 141 

Russian 200a. Intermediate Russian 3-0-3). 

Designed to provide practice in reading, composition, and comprehension. 
Prerequisite: Russian 100b. Staff 

Russian 200b. Intermediate Russian: Literary (3-0-3). 

Introduction to Russian literature with emphasis on composition. Outside reading 
required. Prerequisite: Russian 200a. Staff 

Russian 20Ib. Intermediate Russian: Scientific (3-0-3). 

Reading and translation in field of major study. Prerequisite: Russian 200a. 

Mr. Jitkoff 

Russian 300a. Russian Culture and Civilization (3-0-3). 

Reading and discussion on topics related to the development of Russian civiliza- 
tion. Oral and written reports on assigned topics. The course will be conducted 
in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 200b or 201b. Offered in alternate years: will be 
given in 1967-68. Mr. Jitkoff 

Russian 300b. Reading in Russian Classics (3-0-3). 

Reading in Russian literature. Oral and written reports on assigned topics. The 
course will be conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 300a. Offered in 
alternate years: will be given in 1967-68. Mr. Jitkoff 

Russian 330a, b. History of Russian Literature (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A comprehensive survey of Russian literature from its beginning to the twentieth 
century. Prerequisite: Russian 200b. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 
1968-69. Staff 

Russian 450a, b. Independent Work: Special Topics in Russian Litera- 
ture. (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Research for qualified upperclassmen. Mr. Jitkoff 



SPANISH 

Associate Professors Castaneda, Leal de Martinez 

Assistant Professors Lendinez and Urrutibeheity 

Instructor Green 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in Spanish. Ten of the 
semester-courses offered in fulfillment of major requirements must be 
Spanish courses numbered 300 or higher. Qualified upperclassmen are 
offered an opportunity to earn up to six hours of credit in independen- 
ent work. All departmental majors must have their programs approved 
by the department. 

COURSES 

Spanish 100a, b. First-Year Spanish (3-2-4, each sem.). 

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language, with emphasis on the 
development of audio-lingual skills. Graded readings will be used to introduce the 
student to Hispanic culture and civilization. Language laboratory work required. 

Staff 



142 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNHERSITY 

Spanish UOb. First-Year Spanish (3-2-3). 

A presentation of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. Language laboratory 
work required. Miss Lauderdale 

Spanish 200a, b. Second- Year Spanish (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The first part of this course is devoted to a comprehensive revie^v of grammar 
which will gradually lead the student to engage in natural conversation. Contempo- 
rary short stories will provide current linguistic models and serve as the point of 
departure for class conversation and discussion. The second part of the course is 
intended to introduce the student to the main currents of Hispanic literature. 

Staff 

Spanish 210a, b. Second- Year Spanish (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 110. Review of 
grammatical patterns and selected readings of cultural interest. Miss Lauderdale 

Spanish 300a, b. Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Topics relating to the development of social, political, and economic institutions 
of Spain will form the basis for extensive conversation, discussion, and composition. 
Thus, while further developing his language skills, the student will also be intro- 
duced to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world. Will be given in 1967-68. 

Mr. Leiidinez 

Spanish 320a, b. Survey of Spanish- American Literature (3-0-3, each 

sem.). 

A study of the main trends and outstanding writers of Spanish America. Offered 
in alternate years: will be given in 1968-69. Mrs. Leal de Martinez 

Spanish 340a, b. Spanish Literature from 1800 to the Present (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Particular emphasis on Romantic drama, Gald6s, the generation of '98, Garcia 
Lorca, and contemporary novel and theater. Offered in alternate years: will be given 
in 1967-68. Mrs. Lead de Martinez 

Spanish 350a, b. History of the Spanish Language (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The development of Spanish from the Romanization of Spain to our times. 
Linguistic, cultural, social, and regional factors which have led to modern Spanish. 
Required for students majoring in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 200a,b or its 
equivalent. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 1967-68. Staff 

Spanish 360a, b. Golden Age Drama 3-0-3, each sem.). 

The development of the "comedia" as illustrated by selected works of Lope de 
Vega, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarc6n, Calder6n de la Barca, and other 
seventeenth-century playwrights. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 1967-68. 

Mr. Castaneda 

Spanish 380a, b. Prose and Lyric Poetry of the Golden Age (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

Intensive and detailed analysis of selected texts in poetry and prose, emphasizing 
mysticism, the development of lyric poetry from Garcilaso to G6ngora, the picaresque 
novel, and Cervantes. Offered in alternate years: will be given in 1968-69. 

Mr. Castaneda 

Spanish 400a, b. Survey of Spanish Literature (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Representative readings from the medieval period to the present, while providing 
a panoramic view of the history of Spanish literature, will also be used to develop 
the student's ability in literary study and stylistic analysis. Offered in alternate 
years: will be given in 1968-69. Mr. Lendinez 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 143 

Spanish 420a, b. Independent Work: Special Topics in Spanish Litera- 
ture (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Reserved for qualified upperclassmen who are particularly interested in an author 
or period not covered in other courses. Permission of the department required. 

Staff 



Commerce 

Associate Professor Hale, Chairman 
AND Staff 

COURSES 

Commerce 110a, b. Business Mathematics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Linear equations; exponents and radicals; quadratic equations; binomial 
theorem; logarithms; curve plotting. Compound interest and annuities; sinking 
funds; permutations and combinations; introduction to probability. 

Commerce 210a, b. Introduction to Business (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Historical, economic, and social setting of business enterprise; descriptive analysis 
of business activity. 

Commerce 300a, b. Financial Control (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Introduction to the methods of accounting for partnerships and corporations; 
concepts of costs, income, and profit; financial analysis; problems in valuation, 
depreciation, and surplus accounting. 

Commerce 310a. Business Statistics (3-0-3). 

Collection, classification, and presentation of data; use of graphic methods; 
frequency distributions; sampling; time series; index numbers; correlation. 

Commerce 315b. Finance and Banking (3-0-3). 

Functions and theory of money and credit; principles of commercial banking; 
the Federal Reserve System. 

Commerce 410a. Marketing (3-0-3). 

Marketing functions and institutions; role of commodity characteristics and the 
choice of distribution channels; financing marketing activities; management and 
control of marketing risks. 

Commerce 415b. Business Finance (3-0-3). 

Short- and long-term financing of assets; investment banking; tools of financial 
analysis; budgets and financial planning. 

Commerce 420a. Business Organization I (3-0-3). 

Personnel management and employee relations; personnel policies; job evaluation; 
wage and salary administration; employee services; labor legislation. 

Commerce 425b. Business Organization II (3-0-3). 

Principles of internal organization and control; selected topics in business policy. 



144 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Economics and Business Administration 

Professors Edwards, Krzyzaniak, Levy, Rimlinger, Chairman 
Associate Professors Besen, Huddle 

Simons, Soligo, Wiest, and Young 

Adjunct Associate Professor Land 

Assistant Professors Davis, McLure, Nissen, 

Seagrave, and Smith 
Lecturers Cruikshank, Fare, Giles and Viebig 

The Undergraduate Program in Economics. Undergraduate majors 
are required to take ten semesters of approved departmental courses. 
These must include Economics 200a and b, Business Administration 
200b, Economics 350a, and two additional 300 numbered courses. At 
least two courses for the major must be drawn from Economics 420a, 
430a, 435a, 440a, 450b, and 475a. Students intending to major in eco- 
nomics are urged to take Economics 350a in their sophomore year. 
Mathematics 360a may be substituted for Economics 350a. Mathe- 
matics 360a and b is recommended for students intending to do grad- 
uate work in Economics. Furthermore, in lieu of one or two semes- 
ters of course work, the department offers an independent work pro- 
gram, admission to which is granted on a selective basis. 

The Five-Year Program in Accounting. Students primarily inter- 
ested in accounting may, with departmental approval, extend their 
training into a fifth year. To be eligible for this program students 
must have successfully completed a Bachelor's degree, whether with a 
major in economics or some other field. Students who are interested 
in the five-year program are advised to enroll in Business Administra- 
tion 200b in their Sophomore year, Business Administration 300a, b in 
their Junior year, and Business Administration 400a in their Senior 
year. In the fifth year, students are required to enroll in three full- 
year advanced accounting courses and two additional upperclass- 
courses outside the department. Upon the successful completion of 
these requirements a student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Accounting. This program is designed for those who wish 
to prepare themselves for careers in public accounting as well as for 
positions of managerial responsibility in business. 

The Graduate Program in Economics. Admission to graduate study 
in economics is granted each year to a limited number of students 
who hold an undergraduate degree (or the equivalent), whether in 
economics or another field. The graduate program is designed pri- 
marily for students qualified to pursue a course of study leading to 
the Ph.D. degree. Some training in mathematics at the undergraduate 
level is advisable but is not a prerequisite of admission. The Eco- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 145 

nomics Department also offers graduate work leading to the M.A. de- 
gree. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who have good undergraduate 
preparation in economics should expect to devote two years to full- 
time study (or the equivalent) before taking the general examination 
which must be passed before the submission of the doctoral disserta- 
tion. A minimum of one additional year is usually necessary for com- 
pletion of the dissertation. Applicants are required to take the Grad- 
uate Record Examination. 

The aim of the graduate program is to provide thorough training 
in economic theory and in the use of quantitative methods of analy- 
sis, and also to afford an understanding of modern economic institu- 
tions and policy problems. Those successfully completing the Ph.D. 
program will be prepared for careers as professional economists in 
teaching, business, and government. 

Instruction is carried on in small classes, seminars, and tutorials in 
which student participation is emphasized. Close contact with the fac- 
ulty is encouraged as a means of stimulating and sustaining student 
interest in research problems. 

Supplemental facilities and opportunities include: 

(1) Participation in the Economics Seminar which meets at least 
once a month to hear visiting economists, departmental faculty, 
and graduate students present results of current research, 

(2) Use of a large-scale digital computer in connection with ad- 
vanced research and courses. 

(3) Enrollment in graduate courses in such related subject areas as 
history, mathematics, philosophy, and engineering. 

Candidates for the doctor's degree will be expected to: 

(1) Pass a reading examination in either French or German by the 
end of the first year of residence. Another language may be sub- 
stituted for one of these with permission of the Graduate Com- 
mittee. 

(2) Demonstrate proficiency in statistics, elementary mathematical 
economics, and economic history or history of economic 
thought. 

(3) Complete an approved program of graduate courses. 

(4) Pass a written set of general examinations consisting of: 

a. Economic Theory 

b. A major field examination covering one of the following five 
areas: 

I 

Industrial Organization 
Labor Economics 
Managerial Economics 



146 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

li 

Mathematical Economics 
Systems Theory or Econometrics 

111 

PubHc Finance 
Monetary Theory 
Monetary and Fiscal Policy 

IV 

International Trade 

International Finance 

Economic Growth and Development 

V 

History of Economic Thought 
American Economic History 
European Economic History 
c. Two approved minor field examinations covering two areas 
outside of the major field. A minor field is defined as one of 
the specific subject areas listed in the above major fields. In 
addition, the following may be offered as minor areas: 

Comparative Economic Systems 

Non-Market Decision Making 

An Outside Field, e.g. Social Psychology, American Govern- 
ment, etc. 

Theory of Accounts 

(5) Upon satisfatory completion of the written examinations, pass 
an oral examination emphasizing economic theory and the 
major area. 

(6) Submit (with the approval of the advisory committee) and suc- 
cessfully defend in an oral examinaion a doctoral dissertation 
setting forth in publishable form the results of original research. 

Candidates for the master's degree in economics are expected to 
fulfill the following requirements: 

(1) Complete successfully an approved program of graduate courses. 

(2) Demonstrate proficiency in the use of statistics. 

(3) Make a successful oral defense of a thesis presenting in pre- 
scribed form the results of original research. 

ECONOMICS COURSES 

Econoniics 200a, b. Principles of Economics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The principles of modern eronomics and the history of economic thought and 
controversy. The first part of the course is concerned with the theory of national 
income determination, price and distribution theory, and the theory of trade. In 
the second part of the course the great economic ideas and issues of the past and 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 147 

present are studied, with emphasis on those ideas and policy issues of continuing 
influence in national and international economic affairs. 

Economics 350a. Elements of Statistical Method (3-2-3). 

Basic concepts and techniques in probability theory and statistical inference. 

Economics 355a. Money and Banking (3-0-3). 

Determinants of the demand for money; the relationship between money and 
national income; American financial institutions; instability of prices and income 
and the role of monetary policy; conflicts lietween internal and external stability. 
Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 370a. Economic Analysis I (3-0-3). 

A course in intermediate theory devoted to the study of economic equilibrium 
and market relationships; the theories of the firm and the household, of income 
distribution, and of general equilibrium. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 375b. Economic Analysis II (3-0-3). 

The theory of national income determination and economic growth; a critical 
consideration of selected theories of income fluctuations; some application of theory 
to policy questions. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 403a or b. Senior Independent Research (0-0-3). 

A one semester independent research project for Seniors on an approved topic 
of their own choosing, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Requires the 
preparation of a paper embodying the findings of the research. Enrollment is by 
special permission and on the basis of an approved research topic. 

Economics 404a, b. Senior Honors Thesis (0-0-6). 

A two semester sequence in which each student is required to undertake intensive 
research on a topic approved at the end of his Junior year. The results of this 
research are to be incorporated in a thesis submitted in the spring of the Senior 
year. Enrollment by special permission and on the basis of an approved research 
topic. 

Economics 410b. Economics of Labor Relations (3-0-3). 

A survey of the history and current status of the labor movement in the United 
States; organization and structure of labor unions; trends in labor legislation; 
collective bargaining and the settlement of labor disputes; wage and employment 
theory; social insurance; current labor problems and issues. Prerequisite: Economics 
200a or approval of the instructor. 

Economics 420a. International Economics (3-0-3). 

A study of the economic relationships between separate countries in the inter- 
national economy; trade theory; balance of payments analysis; international finance; 
tariffs and other trade restrictions; current policy issues. Prerequisite: Economics 
200a. 

Economics 430b. Comparative Economic Systems (3-0-3). 

Theoretical models of various economic systems are presented as a basis for 
analyzing the operation and the institutional characteristics of several economies, 
including the U.S., the U.S.S.R., Great Britain, India, and China. Prerequisite: 
Economics 200a. 

Economics 435a. Industrial Organization (3-0-3). 

An analysis of market structure, behavioi, and performance, including the static 
case for competition as qualified by dynamic considerations, especially innovation. 
Also case studies of industries and the interpretation of American anti-trust laws. 
Prerequisite: Economics 200a or approval of instructor. 



148 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Economics 440a. Non-Market Decision Making (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the use of abstract logical models in political and non-market 
decision making. Existing models, closely resembling those used in economics, will 
be explored in detail and their application to specific problems examined. The 
emphasis will be on simpler political models, but extensions to more complex 
models will be discussed. (Also offered as Political Science 440a.) 

Economics 445a. Linear Programming (3-0-3). 

An introduction to analytical and mathematical methods useful in managerial 
decisions. Primary emphasis is placed on linear programming formulations and 
solutions of management problems. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 446b. Managerial Economics (3-0-3). 

The application of economics to decision making within the firm. Topics include 
organization theory, cost and pricing policies, capital budgeting, and problems of 
control. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 450b. Economic Growth and Development (3-0-3). 

An analysis of the mechanics of economic growth in general and specific investi- 
gations of economic development of underdeveloped areas, including problems of 
capital formation, manpower mobilization, population pressures, and economic and 
social organizations. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 475a. Taxation and Fiscal Policy (3-0-3). 

An analysis of taxation and expenditure policies at the federal, state, and local 
levels and their contribution to efficient resource allocation, equitable income 
distribution, full employment, and economic growth. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. 

Economics 480a, b. Operations Research (3-0-3, each semester may be 
taken separately). 

An analysis of economic systems and relevant decision models, including interest 
formulas, present value analysis, capital investment decisions, depreciation and 
tax problems. A study of elementary stochastic processes, including Markov chains, 
queuing models, inventory theory, stochastic replacement problems, reliability and 
other selected topics. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. (Also offered as Engineering 
480a,b.) 

Economics 490a. Development of Economic Institutions (3-0-3). 

A seminar devoted to analysis of the impact of technological change and 
political and social developments upon the evolution of economic institutions. 
Economic forces which lie beyond supply-and-demand factors in the market economy 
are investigated. The course surveys the works of leading institutional economists 
and social anthropologists as a point of departure for research and discussion. 

Economics 495a. Senior Seminar (3-0-3). 

Reading and discussion of selected topics in advanced economics. Open to Seniors 
with special approval. 

Economics 500. Economic Research. 

Research on an approved topic in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
master's degree. 

Economics 501. Price Theory (3-6-5). 

Microeconomic theory Topics studied include the theory of the firm, the theory 
of consumer behavior, duopoly, bilateral monopoly, imperfect competition, capital 
theory, and the theory of income distribution. 

Economics 502. Income and Employment Theory (3-6-5). 

Macroeconomic theory of employment, interest, and income. Considers the work 
of Keynes and subsequent developments. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 149 

Economics 503. Topics in Economic Theory (3-6-5). 

Selected theoretical issues in the areas of capital, welfare economics, uncertainty, 
growth, and income. 

Economics 504. Theory of Public Finance (3-6-5). 

An analysis of governmental revenue and expenditures. Topics include welfare 
economics and market failure, government expenditures and budgeting, principles 
of taxation, the United States tax system and its incidence and other economic 
effects, debt burden, fiscal federalism, and international aspects of taxation. 

Economics 505. Monetary Theory (3-6-5). 

Modern monetary theory. The economics of money, banking, and finance. 

Economics 506. Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3-6-5). 

Selected theories of monetary and fiscal policy and their application. Analysis of 
contemporary policy issues. 

Economics 507. Elementary Mathematical Economics (3-6-5). 

Introduction to mathematical theories of economics. Theory of choice, preference 
and utility. Survey of simple models of exchange, production and consumption, and 
market equilibrium. Elements of programming, games, operational analysis. 

Economics 508. Advanced Mathematical Economics (3-6-5). 

The mathematical framework and the analytical investigation of fundamental 
models in economics. 

Economics 509. Advanced Statistics (3-6-5). 

Statistical inference and the testing of hypotheses; multiple and partial correlation 
analysis; selected topics in time-series analysis and index-number construction. 

Economics 510. Econometrics (3-6-5). 

Mathematical models of economic behavior and their numerical evaluation by 
statistical methods. 

Economics 511. Topics in Policy and Applied Economics (3-6-5). 

Selected research problems in economic development, economic planning, national 
income accounting, and industrial organization. 

Economics 512. International Trade Theory (3-6-5). 

Classical, neoclassical, and modern trade theory; balance of payments equilibrium; 
some welfare aspects of trade. Offered in alternate years. 

Economics 513. Topics in Managerial Economics (3-6-5). 

Theory of investment of the firm; organization theory; problems in applying 
theory in decision-making. 

Economics 514. Industrial Organizations and Control (3-6-5). 

Industrial markets and public policy. Examines the determinants and implications 
of price and production policies and also considers the adequacy of the antitrust 
laws in relation to the problems of industrial organization. 

Economics 515. Labor Economics (3-6-5). 

The economics of the labor market and the economic implication of trade unions. 
Attention is given to major public policy issues. 

Economics 516. Economic History and Development (3-6-5). 

An historical analysis of the economic growth and industrialization of the U.S., 
Western Europe, and Russia in the last 150 years. Stresses the conditions which 
favored or retarded growth in different times and places. 



150 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY' 

Economics 517. History of Economic Thought and Methodology 

(3-6-5). 

The development of economic thought and methodology from the seventeenth 
century to the present. Emphasis is given to classical and neoclassical doctrines 
reflected in modern economic theory and analytical techniques. 

Economics 518. International Finance (3-6-5). 

Analysis of international monetary problems; foreign-exchange theory; inter- 
national investment. Offered in alternate years. 

Economics 519. Economic Growth and Development (3-6-5). 

A analysis of theory and policy questions relating to the level and rate of 
economic development. An examination of development problems, plans, and 
planning techniques in selected countries. 

Economics 527. Fundamentals of Nonlinear Systems (3-0-3). 

Intrinsic properties of nonlinear deterministic and random systems including 
stability, observability and controllability. An introduction to approximation theory 
and its application to nonlinear estimation. Also offered as Chemical Engineering 

517 and Electrical Engineering 517. 

Economics 528. Fundamentals of Optimization Theory (3-0-3). 

A discussion of the mathematical problems encountered when searching for 
the best element in a given set. Existence and nonexistence of extrema. Introduction 
to linear, nonlinear, and dynamic programming, combinatorial problems, varia- 
tional calculus, and optimal control theory. Also ofl^ered as Chemical Engineering 

518 and Electrical Engineering 518. 

Economics 529. Advanced Mathematical Programming (3-0-3). 

Theory, computational methods, and applications of various advanced pro- 
gramming models are discussed. Topics include: nonlinear programming; Kuhn- 
Tucker theory; integer programming; network models; programming models 
subject to stochastic influences. Understanding of the simplex method is assumed. 
Prerequisites: Economics 528 or Economics 445 or equivalent. Also offered as 
Chemical Engineering 519 and Electrical Engineering 519. 

Economics 600. Economic Research. 

Research on an approved topic in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
doctor's degree. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

Business Administration 200a, b. Introduction to Business Administra- 
tion (3-0-3). 

Basic accounting principles; financial statements; interpretation of financial and 
operating reports. 

Business Administration 300a. Principles of Accounting I (3-0-3). 

Study of accounting procedures and principles at the intermediate level; financial 
statements; net income concepts; capital stock, retained earnings, and dividends; 
generally accepted accounting principles; accounting for current assets and invest- 
ments. Prerequisite: Business Administration 200a or 200b. 

Business Administration 300b. Principles of Accounting II (3-0-3). 

Study of accounting for fixed assets, liabilities, and reserves; analysis and inter- 
pretation of statements and operations; combination and reorganizations; fund 
flows; allocation of income taxes; price-level impact on financial statements. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 3G0a or permission of the instructor. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 151 

Business Administration 430. Quantitative Methods (3-0-3). 

An introduction to quantitative methods of data analysis and problem solving 
useful for managerial decision making, including inventory and waiting line models, 
simulation, linear programming, and network models. The computer as a tool 
for quantitative analysis. 

Business Administration 500a. Managerial Accounting (3-0-3). 

An intensive study of the accumulation, analysis, reporting, and use of accounting 
data for business planning, control, and operations. 

Business Administration 501a. Advanced Accounting (3-0-3). 

Partnership; statement of affairs; receiverships; actuarial science; estates and 
trusts; parent and subsidiary accounting; consolidated statements; foreign exchange 
and public accounts. Prerequisite: Business Administration 300a and 300b or 
permission of instructor. 

Business Administration 510a, b. Federal Taxes (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of Federal taxation of individuals, trusts, estates, partnerships, and 
corporations, with required research and writing on tax problems. 

Business Administration 515b. Auditing (3-0-3). 

An intensive study of financial examination theory, organizational control, and 
operations auditing. 

Business Administration 520a. Theory of Accounting (3-0-3). 

Topics of current interest arising from the search for generally acceptable account- 
ing principles. Study of inconsistencies between current theory and practice. 
Applications of economic analysis to accounting concepts. 



Education 

Professor Wood, Chairman 
Assistant Professor Duke 
Lecturers Baum and Buse 

Teacher Education and Certification. Rice University seeks to con- 
tribute graduates to society able to think and to question, educated 
to comprehend and to cope with a rapidly changing world. Although 
professional instruction is not the primary ingredient of undergradu- 
ate education, the University's role in preparing students for their 
future life work cannot be ignored. While maintaining complete in- 
stitutional integrity. Rice University supports the intention as well as 
the letter of regulations promulgated by the state governing the de- 
velopment and presentation of teacher preparation and certification 
programs. 

To this end Rice University has a Department of Education which 
closely cooperates with departments offering work in subject-matter 
fields. It is the function of this department to provide rigorous 
professional courses and to administer the established teacher educa- 
tion programs. 

The Rice University teacher education progiam strives to fit the 



152 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

prospective teacher to perform all the roles which may be expected of 
him. To accomplish this objective, it gives sustained close attention 
to the following vitally interrelated components: 

A. a sound liberal or general education 

B. an extended knowledge of the subject(s) or area(s) to be taught 

C. professional knowledge, as distinguished from professional skills 
(i.e., relevant historical, philosophical, social, and psychological 
material) 

D. skills in managing a classroom, in working with children and 
people, and in the supervision of the learning process. 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Students who have 
satisfied the following requirements may apply to the Education 
Council for admission to the teacher education program: 

1. Junior standing at Rice University 

2. Satisfactory completion of History llOa.b: American History 

3. A grade average of 3 or better in at least 75 per cent of all semester 
hours attempted in teaching field offered for approval 

4. Passing grades in Freshman and Sophomore English courses 

5. Given evidence of satisfactory speech patterns 

6. Provided evidence of adequate physical vigor and strength and 
absence of obvious physical conditions which might interfere 
materially with performance in a classroom as a teacher 

7. Approval of a completed Teacher Certification Program form by 
the appropriate departmental representatives and the Education 
Council prior to registration for the Junior year 

8. Approval of the completed form "Application for Admission to 
the Teacher Education Program" by the Education Council 
prior to registration for the Junior year 

Texas State Requirements for 

Secondary Provisional Certificate 

(Grades 7-12) 

A Provisional Teacher's Certificate is based upon a bachelor's de- 
gree, satisfactory completion of an approved teacher-preparatory pro- 
gram, and the recommendation of the University. Rice University is 
approved to offer the following teacher-preparatory programs: biol- 
ogy, chemistry, English, French, German, health and physical educa- 
tion, history, Latin, mathematics, physics, Spanish, general science, 
and social studies. 

The approved program shall consist of the following: 

1, Foundations in Arts and Sciences: Approximately two years in- 
cluding: 

A. English 12 semester hours 

American History 6 semester hours 

Government 6 semester hours 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 153 

From two of the following: 12 semester hours 

Science 
Mathematics 
Foreign Language 
B. Other institutional degree requirements 

2. Academic Specialization: 

Plan I. Preparation to Teach Two Fields: 

24 semester hours in each area including 12 semester hours 
of advanced work in each, with approval of the Rice 
Education Council. 

Plan II. Preparation to Teach Related Fields: 

48 semester hours in a composite field (general science 
or social studies) with at least 18 semester hours of ad- 
vanced work and with approval of the Rice Education 
Council. 

3. Professional Education: 18 semester hours of which 6 semester hours 
shall be in student teaching. 

4. Elective courses. 

Requirements for Completion of the Teacher Education Program 

To be recommended to the Texas Education Agency for certifica- 
tion, a student must satisfy all institutional requirements for a bache- 
lor's degree which will include: 

1. Completion of History 110a,b and Political Science 210a,b be- 
fore the Junior year 

2. Twenty-four semester hours of credit in each of two teaching 
fields or forty-eight semester hours of credit in a composite field. 

3. Completion of the required professional education courses. Edu- 
cation 310a,b is to be taken in the Junior year and Education 
410a,b in the Senior year 

4. Satisfaction of the supervised student teaching requirement (Ed- 
ucation 420) as outlined below. 

COURSES 

Education 310a. The Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Ed- 
ucation (3-0-3). 

A study of secondary education's historic function in the United States; in- 
tellectual foundations of modern educational thought and practice; philosophic 
analysis of contemporary and recent theories useful in planning the educative 
activities of the secondary school. Prerequisite: History 110 or consent of the 
instructor and filing of Teacher Certification Plan. 

Education 310b. Human Development: The Psychology of Human 

Learning (3-0-3). 

Introductory survey of theoretical systems in the field of human learning together 
with a consideration of their implications for education; motivation; personality 
development in adolescence; statistics; tests and measurement; evaluation. 



154 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Education 410a. Fundamentals of Secondary Education (3-0-3). 

Background and purposes of the secondary school; trends in modern secondary 
education; curriculum of the secondary school; current trends in school administra- 
tion; essentials of educational research. 

Education 410b. Seminar in Teaching (3-0-3). 

Problems that face the beginning teacher; current trends in effective teaching 
materials and procedures; comprehensive study of materials and procedures for 
teaching the student's subject-matter field of specialization in preparation for actual 
teaching; observation of, and orientation to, public school teaching. 

Education 420. Principles of Teaching: Introduction to Teaching in 
the Secondary School and Supervised Teaching. (Credit: 6 semester 
hours.) 

NOTE: Either of two distinct plans may be followed by teacher edu- 
cation candidates. The main difference is the type of supervised 
teaching experience provided. 

The Apprenticeship Plan (Plan A): 

Prerequisite: Education 310a,b. 

Apprenticeship is designed for students who wish to complete prep- 
aration for their teaching careers in four years and two six-week sum- 
mer sessions. Candidates will enroll for the summer session following 
their Junior year. The Apprentice will observe teaching, act as a 
helping teacher, and perhaps teach as may be appropriate in the Rice 
Summer School for High School Students. 

Education 410a,b is to be completed during the Senior year. 

Following graduation from Rice the Apprentice will attend the 
summer session for full-time teaching in the Rice Summer School for 
High School Students under the supervision and guidance of a Mas- 
ter Teacher and the University staff. While the Apprentice spends 
somewhat less time in student teaching than under the Internship 
Plan, he is not remunerated for his teaching service. The Apprentice 
is to be recommended for a Texas Provisional Teacher's Certificate 
following successful completion of his second summer session. 

The Internship Plan (Plan B): 
Prerequisites: Education 310a,b and Education 410a,b 
Under this plan students are expected to attend a six-week summer 
session immediately following their graduation from Rice. Each In- 
tern will observe and teach classes under the supervision of a Master 
Teacher and a University staff member in the Rice Summer School 
for High School Students. During the following fall semester Interns 
will be assigned to classrooms in neighboring school systems for full- 
time duty. Two Interns will be employed as a pair to take the place 
of a normally employed teacher. Each Intern is to teach three periods 
per day under supervision and guidance of a teacher at his assigned 
school and a staff member from the University. During the half-year 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 155 

of their service Interns will be paid a salary commensurate with the 
salary being paid to substitute teachers by cooperating school systems 
for their employment as classroom teachers. Interns successfully com- 
pleting their teaching assignment will be offered a regular contract to 
teach the spring semester and will be recommended for a Texas Pro- 
visional Teacher's Certificate. 



Electrical Engineering 

{See pages 168-174) 

Engineering and Applied Science 

General Undergraduate Information. Curricula in engineering at 
Rice University lead to degrees in the fields of chemical engineering, 
civil engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. 

The first two years of the science-engineering program taken by all 
engineers are described generally on pages 56-59. Sophomore students 
contemplating a major in engineering should pay particular attention 
to the electives recommended under the special engineering depart- 
ments. 

The following undergraduate courses listed as "Engineering" are 
offered for the preparation of students majoring in all branches. For 
requirements of each department, reference should be made to the 
appropriate section. 

COURSES 

Engineering 200. Classical Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A fundamental exposition of the laws of classical thermodynamics and the 
deductions that may be made therefrom. Applications of these principles are illu- 
strated for systems of significance in various disciplines with particular attention 
to pure substances. Prerequisite: Physics lOOa.b. 

Engineering 201. Engineering Graphics I (1-5-3). 

An engineering course which develops graphics as a method of exchanging ideas. 
Included are orthogonal projection, sketching, dimensioning, ASA and SAE 
standards, pictorial projection, and lettering. Staff approval of all drawing instru- 
ments is required. Laboratory fee required. 

Engineering 202. Engineering Graphics II (1-5-3). 

Emphasis on the graphical method of solving technical problems. Included are 
graphical arithmetic, graphical calculus, nomography, and relationships of algebraic 
and graphical solutions of problems in space. Prerequisites: Engineering 201 and 
completion of or registration in Mathematics 200a,b or 210a,b. 

Engineering 211. Engineering Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Equilibrium of static systems, dynamics of a particle, vibrating systems. Pre 
requisites: Physics 100a,b, Mathematics 100a,b. 



156 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Engineering 212. Engineering Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Dynamics of systems of particles, moments and products of inertia, dynamics of 
rigid bodies, Lagrange's equations. Prerequisite: Engineering 211. 

Engineering 240. Introduction to Computer Science (2-3-3). 

The nature of the digital computer. Programming; algorithms and flow charts; 
languages. Data structure and representation. Numeric and non-numeric computing 
techniques. Introduction to numerical analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 100. 

Engineering 241. Systems, Signals, and Electronic Devices (3-4-4). 

A survey of modern electrical engineering stressing the fundamental concepts 
of systems, signals, circuits and electronic devices including an introduction to 
instrumentation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 100a,b, or equivalent. 

Engineering 471. Applied Mathematics I: Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Discussion of elementary properties of finite dimensional real vector spaces. Topics 
included are inner product spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, 
eigenvalue problems, and applications. 

Engineering 472. Applied Mathematics II: Complex Variables (3-0-3). 

Discussion of the elementary concepts of complex variable theory. Topics included 
are complex numbers, complex functions, differentiation, analytic functions, contour 
integration, complex series, analytic continuation, residue theory, conformal mapping, 
and transform theory. 

Engineering 475. Probability Theory (3-0-3). 

Sets and events. Fundamental probability model, random variables, mathematical 
expectation, and limit theorems. Introduction to random processes. Attention is 
given to the role of fundamental concepts in both the development of the mathe- 
matical theory and in the application of this theory to a variety of practical 
problems. 

Engineering 476. Mathematical Statistics; Random Processes (3-0-3). 

Fundamental piobability theory applied to problems of statistical inference. 
Some selected topics in random processes. Continuation of Engineering 475. 

Engineering 480a, b. Operations Research (3-0-3, each semester may be 
taken separately). 

An analysis of economic systems and relevant decision models, including interest 
formulas, present value analysis, capital investment decisions, depreciation and 
tax problems. A study of elementary stochastic processes, including Markov chains, 
queing models, inventory theory, stochastic replacement problems, reliability and 
other selected topics. Prerequisite: Economics 200a. (Also ollered as Economics 
480a,b). 

Engineering 571. Applied Mathematics III: Distributed-Parameter 
Problems; Perturbation Theory (3-0-3). 

Distributed-parameter problems will be discussed with physical examples from 
fluid flow, electromagnetic field theory, elasticity, heat conduction, transport 
phenomena, etc. Mathematical methods for solution will include separation of 
variables, transform techniques, and the method of characteristics. The course 
will also contain an introduction to perturbation theory in ordinary differential 
equations and variational methods. 

Engineering 572b. Numerical Methods (3-0-3). 

Numerical methods and applications including interpolation, solution of systems 
of equations, numerical integration and diflierentiation, and solution of ordinary 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 157 

and partial differential equations by finite difference metfiods. A digital computer 
is used in exercises. 

Engineering 671. Applied Mathematics IV: Approximation Methods; 
Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3). 

Approximation methods in ordinary and partial differential equations will be 
discussed including saddle-point integration, boundary-layer theory, and general 
asymptotic methods. 

Engineering 672. Applied Mathematics V: Advanced Topics (3-0-3). 

Mathematical topics will include integral equations, the Wiener-Hopf method 
in integral and partial differential equations, and variational methods. 

Engineering 673b. Applied Mathematics VI: Applied Functional Anal- 
ysis (3-0-3). 

Topological vector spaces. Functionals and operators in Banach and Hilbert 
spaces. Minimum effort and estimation problems. Applications to adaptive and 
learning systems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 410b or consent of instructor. 



Chemical Engineering 

Professors Akers, Deans, Hellums, Horn, Jackson, Kobayashi, 

AND Leland, Chairman 

Associate Professors S. Davis and Hightower 

Assistant Professors Dyson and G. Fisher 

Undergraduate Program. A general outline of the undergraduate 
engineering program is given on pages 57-59. Chemistry 200a,b is re- 
quired for chemical engineering majors and is normally taken during 
the Sophomore year. 

The undergraduate curriculum in chemical engineering is designed 
to provide a sound scientific and technical basis for further profes- 
sional development. At the same time, the curriculum affords each 
student an opportunity to specialize in one of a number of technical 
areas. At the beginning of his fourth year, the student selects an inte- 
grated sequence of technical electives for his last two years. This 
group of courses, chosen with the counsel of a faculty adviser, is in- 
tended to give the student greater depth in an area of particular 
interest to him. Examples of such areas are applied mathematics, nu- 
clear technology, environmental science and engineering, chemical 
process kinetics, engineering economics, process dynamics and molecu- 
lar or continuum mechanics. 

After completing four years of his curriculum, the student receives 
a Bachelor of Arts degree, with a chemical engineering major. If his 
achievement is satisfactory, he then qualifies for a fifth year of study 
leading to the professional degree. Master of Chemical Engineering. 

Students with special interest in research may, upon recommenda- 



158 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

tion of the department and approval of the Graduate Council, enter 
a program leading directly to the Master of Science degree after com- 
pleting the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Graduate Program. Graduate study in chemical engineering can 
lead to either the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy de- 
gree. University requirements for these degrees are outlined on pages 
99-104. 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree is required to com- 
plete a minimum of eight approved one-semester courses with high 
standing. He must also submit, and defend in an oral examination, a 
thesis indicating his research ability. 

A candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must demonstrate 
his competence in the areas of applied mathematics, thermodynamics, 
and transport processes, as well as in his chosen field of interest. He 
must also pass a qualifying examination, normally during his second 
year of residence. His thesis must be defensible evidence of his ability 
to carry out meaningful research in a specialized area of chemical 
engineering. 

In addition to the normal program in chemical engineering, the 
department participates in two interdisciplinary graduate programs. 
These programs are particularly designed for students who received 
their previous degree(s) in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or biol- 
ogy, but who have become interested in the engineering applications 
appropriate to a particular field of interest. In these programs, a 
graduate student is not expected to be responsible for the broad 
background in chemical engineering expected in a regular program 
but, instead, substitutes his background in his own particular field 
and is responsible for only that part of chemical engineering ap- 
propriate to his program. The two programs are: 

1. Nuclear Engineering, in cooperation with the Physics Depart- 
ment; 

2. Systems Theory, Information Theory, and Process Control, iii 
cooperation with the Electrical Engineering Department. 



COURSES 

Chemical Engineering 30Ia. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals 
(3-0-3). 

A first course in the application of chemical engineering principles; the use of 
basic mathematical concepts, physical laws, stoichiometry, and the thermodynamic 
properties of matter to obtain material and energy balances for systems undergoing 
both steady and unsteady state changes. 

Chemical Engineering 302b. Separation Processes I (3-0-3). 

A systematic treatment of single and multistage contacting operations involving 
binary and mulicomponenl systems. The systems are studied using finite difference 
calculus when appropriate. The operations discussed include distillation, absorption, 
leaching, and extraction. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 159 

Chemical Engineering 401a. Introduction to Transport Phenomena 

(3-0-3). 

The fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport applied to 
the continuum; the analysis of macroscopic physical systems based on the continuum 
equations. 

Chemical Engineering 402b. Special Topics in Transport Phenomena 
(3-0-3). 

A detailed treatment of special topics in transport phenomena. Topics include 
flow of ideal fluids, boundary-layer theory, conduction and convection of heat, and 
mass transfer. 

Chemical Engineering 443a, b. Chemical Engineering Laboratory 

(0-3-1, each sem.). 

Principles of staged processes and transport phenomena are illustrated through 
experiment. A report is required on each experiment. 

Chemical Engineering 501a. Rate Processes (3-0-3). 

The derivation of the equations of change for a continuum fluid. Analysis of 
mass, momentum and heat transport problems using the general transport equations. 

Chemical Engineering 502b. Advanced Rate Processes (3-0-3). 

A study of recent advances in the theory of transport processes; the application 
of current techniques to the solution of engineering transport problems. 

Chemical Engineering 503a, b. Simulation and Design of Chemical En- 
gineering Processes (3-0-3)a, (3-3-4)b. 

A synthesis course applying the principles of staged processes, transport phe- 
nomena and chemical kinetics to the simulation, optimal design, and optimal 
operation of equipment and processes. The second semester includes a computation 
laboratory. 

Chemical Engineering 511a. Thermodynamics I (3-0-3). 

An advanced treatment of the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic behavior 
of pure and multicomponent fluids. Chemical and physical equilibrium in multi- 
component systems. 

Chemical Engineering 5I2b. Thermodynamics II (3-0-3). 

Special applications of the equilibrium concept to systems involving gravitational, 
surface, or electrical effects. A detailed study of nonideal solutions. Selected problems 
and topics in thermodynamics. 

Chemical Engineering 517. Fundamentals of Nonlinear Systems (3-0-3). 

Intrinsic properties of nonlinear deterministic and random systems including 
stability, observability and controllability. An introduction to approximation theory 
and its application to nonlinear estimation. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 

517 and Economics 527. 

Chemical Engineering 518. Fundamentals of Optimization Theory 
(3-0-3). 

A discussion of the mathematical problems encountered when searching for the 
best element in a given set. Existence and nonexistence of extrema. Introduction 
to linear, nonlinear, and dynamic programming, combinatorial problems, varia- 
tional calculus, and optimal control theory. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 

518 and Economics 528. 

Chemical Engineering 519. Advanced Mathematical Programming 
(3-0-3). 

Theory, computational methods, and applications of various advanced pro- 



160 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

gramraing models are discussed. Topics include: nonlinear programming; Kuhn- 
Tucker theory; integer programming; network models; programming models subject 
to stochastic influences. Understanding of the simplex method is assumed. Pre- 
requisites: E.E. 518 or Economics 445 or equivalent. Also offered as Economics 529 
and Electrical Engineering 519. 

Chemical Engineering 531a. Nuclear Engineering (3-0-3). 

An introductory course in nuclear properties, nuclear reactions, radioactive 
decay, and fission reactions; theory and design of nuclear reactions using the one 
group model, the Fermi age treatment, and neutron diffusion; nuclear processing, 
waste disposal, and health physics. 

Chemical Engineering 532b. Nuclear Engineering (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Chemical Engineering 531 with a more advanced treatment 
of nuclear reactor theory using the two-group and multigroup methods and 
neutron transport theory; calculations for time-dependent reactor operations, 
temperature and heat transfer effects in a reactor, reactors with reflectors and 
breeder reactors; a more detailed consideration of the related topics of fuel cycles, 
isotope separation, and shielding. 

Chemical Engineering 543a, b. Advanced Projects Laboratory (0-3-1, 

each sem.). 

Individual and group projects under the direction of various members of the 
staff. A comprehensive report is required at the end of each semester. 

Chemical Engineering 551a or b. Separation Process II (3-0-3). 

A quantitative study of multistage calculations for multicomponent systems; 
analog and digital computer solutions of separation problems; the development of 
mathematical models for real stages. 

Chemical Engineering 560a or b. Heterogeneous Equilibrium and the 
Phase Rule (3-0-3). 

Heterogeneous equilibrium in pure, binary, and multicomponent systems is 
studied from the standpoint of the phase rule of Gibbs over extreme ranges of 
pressures and temperatures. General thermodynamic principles are introduced 

whenever possible. 

Chemical Engineering 575a or b. Process Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Development of dynamic equations for discrete and continuous models of chemical 
systems. Linearization techniques applied to control problems in chemical processes. 
Simulation techniques using analog and digital computers. Stability and phase plane 
analysis of nonlinear systems. 

Chemical Engineering 590a or b. Chemical Reaction Kinetics (3-0-3). 
Study of rates of elementary reactions; the kinetics of complex reaction systems; 
interactions between chemical rates and transport phenomena; theory of chemical 
reactors. 

Chemical Engineering 610. Models in Systems Theory (3-0-3). 

The art of developing appropriate mathematical models for systems is introduced 
by the study of examples selected from a wide variety of fields. Both deterministic 
and stochastic models are considered. The special assumptions, parameters, and 
empirical data required for each model are discussed. Factors influencing the choice 
of a model for any specific problem are identified and illustrated. Some attention is 
given to the types of mathematical problems posed by various models, but primary 
attention is directed to the formulation of problems tlirough the development of 
suitable models. 

Chemical Engineering 662a, b. Graduate Seminar (1-0-1, each sem.). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 161 

Chemical Engineering 670a, b. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics 
(3-0-3, each sem.). 

Special topics in applied mathematics applied to chemical engineering problems. 
Chemical Engineering 683a, b. M.S. Research and Thesis. 

Chemical Engineering 685a or b. Molecular Theory of Fluids (3-0-3). 

The application of the molecular theory of fluids to calculation of fluid proper- 
ties. Discussions include the kinetic theory of gases and the statistical mechanics 
of fluids. 

Chemical Engineering 690a or b. Kinetics and Catalysis (3-0-3). 

Chemical reaction rates, reaction mechanisms, theories of catalysis, diffusion in 
porous solids. 

Chemical Engineering 691a or b. Chemical Reaction Engineering 

(3-0-3). 

Application of transport theory to chemically reactive multicomponent fluids. Em- 
phasis is on transient behavior of two-phase flowing systems, as in chromatography. 

Chemical Engineering 720a or b. Advanced Topics in Chemical Engi- 
neering. (3-0-3). 

Chemical Engineering 783a, b. Ph.D. Research and Thesis. 



Civil Engineering 



Professors W. J. Austin, Krahl, Sims, and Veletsos, Chairman 

Associate Professors Holt, McDonald, and Merwin 

Assistant Professors Jirsa, Lutes, and Vann 

The profession of civil engineering is concerned with the develop- 
ment, planning, design, construction, and operation of the large facil- 
ities and systems which help improve man's environment and contrib- 
ute to his safer and more enjoyable living. These facilities include: 

a) structures of various forms, such as bridges, buildings, industrial 
plants, stadiums, towers, dams, docks, marine platforms, oil 
drilling rigs, missile bases, launching platforms for space vehicles, 
the great antennas that have been constructed for space com- 
munication and space research, and the space platforms that may 
be expected in the future; 

b) transportation systems, such as highways, railroads, airfields, 
canals, harbors, and pipelines; 

c) systems for water supply, hydropower, irrigation, drainage, flood 
control, and navigation; and 

d) systems for waste disposal, and for air and water pollution control. 

The planning of new communities and the redevelopment of existing 
cities are also within the spectrum of civil engineering activities. 



162 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Undergraduate Program. The general requirements for Civil Engi- 
neering degrees are described on pages 00-00. Students contemplating 
a major in civil engineering should take Engineering 200, 211, 212, 
240 and 241 as part of their electives in the Sophomore year. How- 
ever, schedule adjustments may be made in following years to permit 
those students who do not take all of these courses as Sophomores to 
major in civil engineering without the need of taking additional 
courses. 

The undergraduate curriculum is designed to provide a sound 
basis for future professional growth. The emphasis during the first 
four years is on mathematics and the engineering sciences, especially 
solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, and materials. After successful com- 
pletion of four years of study, a student receives a Bachelor of Arts 
degree with a civil engineering major. He may then qualify for a 
fifth year of study leading to the professional degree of Master of 
Civil Engineering. The fifth year of study is devoted primarily to 
civil engineering subjects. Through the provision of numerous elec- 
tives in the fourth and fifth years, the student may obtain some de- 
gree of specialization in one of the following technical areas: struc- 
tural engineering and mechanics, soil mechanics and soils engineer- 
ing, or environmental engineering. The course requirements for each 
year of study may be obtained from the departmental office. The de- 
tailed program of each student is formulated in consultation with his 
advisor. 

Students with special interest in research may, upon recommenda- 
tion of the Department and approval of the Graduate Council, enter 
a program leading to the Master of Science degree directly after com- 
pleting the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Graduate Program. The primary strength of the graduate program 
in civil engineering is in the fields of structural engineering and ap- 
plied mechanics although graduate work is also offered in soil me- 
chanics and soils engineering. The program emphasizes the scientific 
fundamentals of these disciplines; it is designed to develop strength 
in depth and the ability to keep abreast of the technical develop- 
ments that may be expected in the years ahead. Special attention is 
given to promoting the student's interest in and ability for indepen- 
dent study and research. The programs of study offered can lead to 
the degrees of Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy. University requirements for these degiees are 
outlined on pages 99-104. 

A candidate for the Master of Civil Engineering degree is required 
to complete ten semester-courses, of which two must be in the social 
sciences or humanities. A candidate for the Master of Science degree 
is required to complete the equivalent of seven semester-courses and 
an acceptable thesis. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy must satisfy the following requirements: complete the equivalent 
of sixteen semester-courses with high standing; pass a comprehensive 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 163 

qualifying examination designed to test the candidate's knowledge of 
his field and his ability to think in a creative manner; complete a 
thesis which shall constitute an original contribution to knowledge; 
and pass a final oral examination on the thesis and related topics. In 
addition, he must demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign 
language, usually French, German, or Russian. 

The research interests of the members of the civil engineering fac- 
ulty are in the areas of structural dynamics, plate and shell struc- 
tures, numerical analysis and computer utilization, plasticity, concrete 
technology, and soil mechanics and soils engineering. 

The recently completed Ryon Engineering Laboratory provides a 
modem facility for research in the above areas. The computer facili- 
ties are ample for undergraduate and graduate instruction and re- 
search. They include an IBM 1620, the Rice computer, and an IBM 
7040. 

COURSES 

Civil Engineering 300. Introduction to Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3). 

Stresses and deformations due to tensile, compressive, and shearing forces, bending 
moments, and torque. Consideration of beams, columns, shafts, pressure vessels, 
axially-loaded members, members with combined loadings, determinate and in- 
determinate structural systems. Study of engineering properties of materials and 
failure theories. Prerequisite: Engineering 211 or equivalent. Mr. Merwin 

Civil Engineering 302. Structural Analysis I (3-0-3). 

Analysis of statically determinate beams, frames, trusses, and funicular structures, 
including space structures. Influence lines. Approximate analysis of statically 
indeterminate structures. Prerequisite: Engineering 211. 

Civil Engineering 350. Engineering Measurements and Surveying 

(3-3-4). 

Theory of measurements in general, including types of errors, distribution of 
errors, measures of precision, the principle of least squares, propagation of errors, 
and dimensional analysis. Application of these concepts in elementary surveying 
and route surveying. Geometric design of highways, considering horizontal and 
vertical curves, earthwork, and safety. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Vann 

Civil Engineering 403. Structural Analysis II (3-0-3). 

Basic theorems of structural analysis. Deflections of beams and trusses. Classical 
methods of analysis of statically indeterminate trusses, beams, and framed structures. 
Influence lines for statically indeterminate structures. Prerequisites: Civil Engi- 
neering 300 and Civil Engineering 302. 

Civil Engineering 431. Concrete Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Properties of constituent materials of concrete. Design and control of concrete 
mixtures. Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Laboratory tests of reinforced 
concrete members, including beams in flexure, beams in combined shear and 
flexure, and columns. Laboratory fee required, Messrs. Jirsa and Krahl 

Civil Engineering 432. Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 
(3-0-3). 

Design of structural members and frameworks of reinforced concrete. Working 
stress and ultimate strength design. Introduction to prestressed concrete. Design 
of typical parts of buildings, bridges, and foundations. Mr. Krahl 



164 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Civil Engineering 434. Design of Metal Structures (3-0-3). 

Design of tension members, compression meml^ers, beams, and connections. 
Design of plate girders, roof trusses, simple bridge trusses, and building frames. 
Introduction to plastic design of steel structures. Mr. Krahl 

Civil Engineering 450. Transportation (3-0-3). 

Transportation as an overall system for moving persons and goods. Important 
considerations in planning, designing and operating such major constituents of a 
transportation system as streets and highways, airports, railways and waterways. 

Mr. Lutes 

Civil Engineering 460. Mechanics of Fluids (3-0-3). 

Fundamentals of fluid mechanics, including properties of fluids, fluid statics, 
flow concepts, viscous efl^ects, dimensional analysis, dynamic similitude, and two- 
dimensional ideal fluid flow. Engineering applications. Mr. Meruiin 

Civil Engineering 461. Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering 
(3-0-3). 

Principles and design of water collection, transmission, and distribution systems, 
including hydrology, reservoirs and dams, and open-channel and conduit trasmission 
s) stems. Control and use of water resources, including irrigation, municipal and 
industrial water supply, river navigation, drainage, flood prevention, and sewage 
disposal. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 460 or equivalent. Mr. Austin 

Civil Engineering 470. Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering I 
(3-3-4). 

A comprehensive introductory course. Geological origins and classification of 
soils and their hydraulic, strength, and compressibility characteristics. Stress dis- 
tribution in soils, bearing capacity of shallow and pile foundations, lateral earth 
pressure, slope stability. Field exploration procedures. All the standard tests are 
performed in the laboratory. Laboratory fee required. 

Civil Engineering 490. Civil Engineering Professional Practice (3-0-3). 
A course to acquaint the students with the professional aspects of engineering 
works-project financing, elements of contracts and specifications, discussion of A.I.A., 
A.S.C.E., and A.G.C. agreement forms, manuals of professional practice. Offered on 
demand. Mr. Sims 

Civil Engineering 491. Senior Laboratory I (0-3-1). 

This course provides laboratory instruction in several disciplines of interest. 
Selected experiments in the fields of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, strength of 
materials, and material science are performed. Laboratory fee required. Olfered 
jointly as Mechanical Engineering 406. Messrs. Merwin and Plapp 

Civil Engineering 492. Senior Laboratory II (0-3-1). 

Continuation of Civil Engineering 491. Laboratory fee required. This course is 
offered jointly as Mechanical Engineering 407. Messrs. Merivin and Plapp 

Civil Engineering 500. Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in stress analysis. Three-dimensional states of stress and strain; 
theories of failure of elastic action; shear center; unsymmetrical bending; curved 
beams; beams on elastic supports; flat plates; torsion of noncirctilar sections; 
column theory; local buckling; lateral buckling; stress concentration; plastic 
analysis. Properties of metals. Mr. Merwin 

Civil Engineering 503. Structural Analysis III (3-0-3). 

Matrix methods of structural analysis. Flexibility and stiffness of structural 
elements. Equations of compatibility and equilibrium. Force and displacement 
methods of analysis. Nonlinear structures; arches and suspension bridges. Pre- 
requisite: Civil Engineering 403 or equivalent. Mr. Holt 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 165 

Civil Engineering 504. Numerical Methods of Structural Analysis 
(3-0-3). 

Numerical methods foi the solution of complex structural engineering problems. 
Newmark procetUire for the analysis of beams, beam-columns, and l^eams on elastic 
foundations and for the determination of buckling loads and natural frecjuencies. 
Finite didcrence method for approximate solution of boundary value problems in 
ordinary and partial differential equations. Numerical procedures for the solution 
of eigenvalue problems. Methods for the integration of propagation problems. 
Applications to problems in stress analysis, buckling, dynamic behavior and 
vibrations. Mr. Austin 

Civil Engineering 506. Experimental Stress Analysis (2-3-3). 

Selected topics from theory of elasticity; strain measurement methods, mechanical 
and electrical resistance strain gages; grid and Moire techniques; brittle coating 
methods; photoelastic methods; analogies; instrumentation, circuitry and recording 
instruments; analysis of experimental data. Laboratory fee required. 

Civil Engineering 507. Structural Models (2-3-3). 

Dimensional analysis, similarity and model laws, derivation of model laws from 
differential ecjuations, direct and indirect models, design and construction of 
structural models, characteristics of suitable materials, laboratory measurements 
and interpretation of results. Laboratory fee required. Mr, Krahl 

Civil Engineering 520. Structural Dynamics I (3-0-3). 

Free vibration, forced vibration, and transient response of linear systems having 
from one to an infinite number of degrees of freedom; response spectra for undamped 
and damped systems subjected to exciting forces and giound motions; formulation 
of problems in matrix form; modal analysis; approximate methods of computation 
of natural frequencies and modes; applications to design. Mr. Veletsos 

Civil Engineering 531. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Members 
(3-0-3). 

Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Beliavior of reinforced concrete 
members under various loadings from first application of load to ultimate load. 
Study of sections subjected to pure flexural and axial loads, combined bending and 
axial load, combined sliear ancl flexure, and torsion. Bond and anchorage problems. 
Evaluation of design specifications according to results of research and engineering 
practice. Messrs. Jirsa and Krahl 

Civil Engineering 532. Prestressed Concrete (3-0-3). 

Properties of materials used in prestressed concrete construction under short- 
time and sustained loads. Methods of prestressing. Strength and behavior of pre- 
stressed concrete members subjected to axial, flexural, shear, and torsional forces. 
Development of design criteria for prestressed concrete members. Special applica- 
tions of prestress concepts to slabs, continuous structures, tanks and pressure vessels. 

Mr. Jirsa 

Civil Engineering 536. Design of Lightweight Structures (3-0-3). 

Analysis and design of structures and structural members of minimum weight. 
Offered on demand. Mr. Sims 

Civil Engineering 570. Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering II 

(3-0-3). 

Review of fundamentals. Design of shallow and pile foundations. Analysis of 
earth slopes and design of earth dams. Design of retaining walls and rigid and 
flexible pavements. 

Civil Engineering 604. Engineering Analysis (3-0-3). 

Study of the nature of complex problems in engineering and of the means of 
obtaining practical solutions. General classifications of physical problems. Methods 



IGf) WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

for the formulation and solution of equilibrium, eigenvalue, and propagation 
problems in discrete and continuous systems. Applications primarily to problems in 
mechanics and structural analysis, including equilibrium, buckling, dynamics, and 
vibration problems. Mr. Austin 

Civil Engineering 605. Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Fundamental principles and direct methods of variational calculus. General 
discussion of basic concepts of mechanics of deformable solid bodies. Principle of 
virtual work with applications to problems of equilibrium and stability. Derivation 
of variational principles of mechanics, including stationary potential energy, com- 
plementary energy, and Reissner's variational theorem. Applications to equilibrium 
problems in both small and large deformation theories, and to problems of stability. 
Variational principles of dynamics with applications. Mr. Vann 

Civil Engineering 610. Analysis of Plates (3-0-3). 

Bending theory of medium-thick plates with applications to the analysis of plates 
of rectangular, circular, and other shapes. Discussion of various methods of solution. 
Orthotropic plates and gridworks. Refined theories of plates, effects of in-plane 
forces, large deflections, limit analysis. Messrs. Austin and Veletsos 

Civil Engineering 611. Analysis of Shells (3-0-3). 

Membrane and bending theory of thin cylindrical shells with applications to the 
analysis of roof shells, tanks, and pipes. Discussion of approximate theories. 
Differential geometry of shells. Membrane and bending analyses of shells of revolu- 
tion and translational shells. Messrs. Austin and Veletsos 

Civil Engineering 612. General Theory of Shells (3-0-3). 

Differential geometry of surfaces. General linear theory of bending of elastic 
shells of arbitrary shape. Discussion of various approximate theories. Solution of 
problems of technical interest by exact and approximate methods. Introduction to 
nonlinear theories and stability problems. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 
627. 

Civil Engineering 615. Theoretical Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Formation of basic laws of isotropic and anisotropic plastic no\v; yield and 
loading surfaces, normality and convexity requirement, and hardening rules; plane 
plastic flow problems and slip-line field theory; introduction to limit analysis 
theorems. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 628. 

Civil Engineering 616. Applied Plasticity (3-0-3). 

A study of the mechanics of inelastically deformed bodies; applied limit analysis 
and limit design; flexure and torsion of prismatic members; axially symmetric 
problems; shakedown and incremental collapse; elastically contained plastic defor- 
mation. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 629. Mr. Merwin 

Civil Engineering 620. Structural Dynamics II (3-0-3). 

Free and forced vibration of nonlinear elastic and inelastic systems. Approximate 
methods of analysis, criteria for stability, subharmonic and superharmonic vibrations. 
Propagation of waves in elastic solids, with special reference to effects of blast and 
earthquakes. Characteristics of recorded earthquake motions and response of 
structures to such inputs. Earthquake-resistant design of structures. Introduction 
to vibration of plates, gridworks, arches and cylindrical shells. Offered in alternate 
years. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 520 or equivalent. Mr. Veletsos 

Civil Engineering 622. Random Vibration (3-0-3). 

The theory of stochastic processes applied to problems of random vibration. 
Both single-degree-of-freedom and multi-degree-of-freedom systems with stationary 
and nonstationary vibration are considered. In addition to analyzing linear systems, 
exact and approximate methods of studying some nonlinear systems are presented. 

Mr. Lutes 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 167 

Civil Engineering 624. Stress Waves in Solids (3-0-3). 

1 heory of wave propagation with applications to structural engineering. Topics 
include waves in an infinite medium, reflection and refraction at a boundary, wave 
scattering, and dispersion in a bounded medium. Specific applications considered 
include exact and approximate theories of waves propagating along elastic rods, 
beams, and plates. Mr. Lutes 

Civil Engineering 626. Theory of Elastic Stability (3-0-3). 

Concept of stability of equilibrium. Classification of mechanical systems, external 
effects, and stability criteria. Classical buckling problems, with particular reference 
to flexural and torsional bucicling of columns, lateral buckling of beams, buckling 
of frameworks, arches, and plates. Inelastic buckling. Nonconservative problems. 
Dynamic buckling. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Vann 

Civil Engineering 631. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Structures 
(3-0-3). 

Behavior of reinforced concrete structures under various loadings, with emphasis 
on ultimate strength. Consideration of statically indeterminate beams and frames. 
Design and analysis of floor slabs including yield-line theories. Evaluation of 
building code specifications and discussion of research in reinforced concrete 
structures. Mr. Jirsa 

Civil Engineering 634. Behavior of Metal Structures (3-0-3). 

A critical evaluation of the behavior of metals, connections, members, and struc- 
tures; significance of this behavior in terms of design. Interpretation of codes and 
specifications for the design of bridges and buildings. Offered on demand. 

Civil Engineering 670. Advanced Soil Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Detailed consideration of compressibility and shear characteristics of cohesive 
and granular soils. Lateral earth pressures. Advanced theories of stress distribution 
in soils and bearing capacity of shallow and pile foundations. Seepage. Behavior of 
soils under dynamic loads. Brief consideration of deformational behavior of rock 
masses. 

Civil Engineering 671. Theoretical Soil Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Consideration of stress and strain and the relations of elasticity, viscosity, plas- 
ticity, and combinations thereof. Rheology of cohesive and granular soils. Review 
of recent theories of soil deformation. Solution of complex soil mechanics problems, 
including use of approximation techniques. 

Civil Engineering 699. Special Problems. (Variable credit). 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations under the direction 
of a member of the Civil Engineering faculty. Staff 

Civil Engineering 700. Research and Thesis. 

An original research investigation carried out by the individual student under 
the direction of a member of the Civil Engineering faculty. Staff 

A number of courses offered in other Departments are also recom- 
mended to students in Civil Engineering. The reader is referred, par- 
ticularly, to the courses in applied mathematics listed under Engi- 
neering and under Mathematics, to the additional courses in mechan- 
ics and materials offered in the Department of Mechanical and Aero- 
space Engineering and Materials Science, and to the courses in sys- 
tems theory and optimization offered in the Department of Electrical 
Engineering. 



168 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Electrical Engineering 

Professors Bourne, Chairman, De Figueiredo, Gordon, 

McEnany, Pfeiffer, and Wischmeyer 

Associate Professors Jain, Leeds, Pearson, Rabson and Tittel 

Visiting Associate Professors Kusuda and Stanton 

Assistant Professors Bahler, Burrus, L. E. Davis, Huband, 

Jump, Parks, and Sibert 

Lecturers Cyprus, MacPhail, and Orvedahl 

The first two years of the science-engineering program are de- 
scribed on pages 56-59 of the catalog. Sophomore students contem- 
plating a major in electrical engineering should elect Engineering 
200, 240, and 241 and a full year of Physics 210a,b. However, provi- 
sions are made in the Electrical Engineering curriculum so that stu- 
dents who fail to take these suggested electives in the Sophomore 
year may rectify this ommission in the Junior year with appropriate 
adjustments in their program. 

After completing four years of his curriculum, the student receives 
a Bachelor of Arts degree, with an electrical engineering major. If his 
achievement is satisfactory, he then qualifies for a fifth year of study 
leading to the professional degree. Master of Electrical Engineering. 

Representative programs showing the normal registration in 
courses for each year leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts and 
Master of Electrical Engineering are available from the department. 
These programs are flexible and may be adjusted to suit the individ- 
ual interests and needs of the student. 

Qualified students may, upon recommendation of the department 
and approval of the Graduate Council, enter a program leading di- 
rectly to the Master of Science degree after completing the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 

Requirements of a general nature for advanced degrees are out- 
lined on pages 99-104. Students should consult the department advisers 
for specific courses of study. 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree in the Electrical En- 
gineering Department is required to complete an approved course of 
study. In addition, he is required to complete an approved research 
program and submit an acceptable thesis. A semester or more of su- 
pervised teaching is considered a valuable part of graduate education. 

The granting of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy presupposes 
high quality academic work and demonstrated ability to do indepen- 
dent and creative research. To be admitted to candidacy, the student 
must show promise of realizing these goals by obtaining high stand- 
ing in an approved course program and by performing satisfactorily 
on qualifying examinations designed to test his grasp of fundamen- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 169 

tals as well as his ability to think independently. Normally, the can- 
didate completes the requirements for a Master's degree as part of his 
program. The candidate must satisfy the department language re- 
quirement and participate in a program of supervised teaching. Em- 
phasis is placed on the research leading to a satisfactory dissertation. 
Each candidate takes a final oral examination, as described on page 
101. The doctoral candidate should expect to devote, as a minimum, 
the equivalent of three full academic years of graduate study in this 
program. 

Regular graduate programs in electrical engineering include the 
general areas of systems and control theory, communications and in- 
formation theory, active and passive networks, computers, solid-state 
and physical electronics, electromagnetic theory, and bioengineering. 
In addition to the regular graduate programs, there are four special 
graduate programs particularly designed for those who received their 
previous degree(s) in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or the other sci- 
ences, including undergraduate engineering science programs, but 
who have become interested in the engineering applications appropri- 
ate to a particular field of science. These programs exist in the areas 
of systems theory, solid-state electronics and materials science, com- 
puter science, and bioengineering. 

In the following list a course program in a given area contains 
courses in the 300-series, 400-series, 500-series, and 600-series. Courses 
in a given area are identified by the second digit in the number. 

COURSES 

Electrical Engineering 301. Fundamentals of Network Analysis (3-4-4). 
Network equations and topology. State equations of networks: formulation and 
solution. Concepts of modes, stability, excitability, observability. Input-output 
relations using exponential excitations; transfer functions, n-ports. Relations of 
eigenvalues, poles, modes, and frequency response. Prerequisite: Engineering 241. 
Laboratory fee required. 

Electrical Engineering 305. Electromagnetic Field Theory (3-0-3). 

Review of vector analysis. Electrostatics. Magnetostatics. Boundary-value problems. 
Electromagnetic induction. Maxwell's equations and plane waves. Prerequisites: 
Physics 210a,b. 

Electrical Engineering 342. Electronic Circuits (3-4-4). 

Low-pass, band -pass, and compensated amplifier stages. Power amplifiers, multi- 
stage amplifiers. Biasing of transistors. Feedback amplifiers and oscillators. Electronic 
instrumentation. Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 301 and Mathematics 300a. 
Laboratory fee required. 

Electrical Engineering 401. Linear System Theory (3-4-4). 

A unified study of signals and linear systems. Signal analysis is based on the 
Fourier, Bilateral Laplace, and Z Transforms. Input-output analysis of systems is 
based on the convolution integral. The state variable formulation is developed and 
related to transfer functions. 

Electrical Engineering 403. Magnetic Circuits and Machines (3-44). 
Energy in magnetic and dielectric systems; linear magnetic circuits and trans- 



170 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

formers; nonlinear magnetic circuits and magnetic amplifiers; priciples of electro- 
mechanical energy conversion, rotating machinery, and transducers. Laboratory fee 
required. 

Electrical Engineering 406. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation (3-0-3). 
Transmission lines. Plane waves. Plane interfaces. Guided waves. Rectangular and 
circular waveguides. Microwave resonant cavities. Radiation. Linear antennas and 
simple arrays. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 305. 

Electrical Engineering 415. Control Systems I (34-4). 

Introduction to the design of feedback control systems. Description of typical 
control system components. Stability of linear and nonlinear systems. Analysis and 
design of control systems in the frequency domain. Optimization of linear systems. 
Hybrid systems. Laboratory projects will be assigned on the representation, design 
and testing of a system. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 401. 

Electrical Engineering 420. Pulse and Digital Circuits (3-4-4). 

Oscillators, timing circuits, counters. Bistable, monostable, and astable circuits. 
Diode gates and selection matrices. Trigger circuits and blocking oscillators. Em- 
phasis is placed upon discrete component solid state technology. Prerequisite: 
Electrical Engineering 342. Laboratory fee required. 

Electrical Engineering 421. Digital System Components (3-4-4). 

Organization of digital computers. Number systems, arithmetic and control 
units, input-output equipment. Logic implementation, applications of Boolean 
algebra, logic partitioning, printed circuit technology. Emphasis is placed upon 
application of integrated circuits. The class participants will design and build an 
operational digital system in lab during the semester. Prerequisite: Electrical 
Engineering 420. Laboratory fee required. 

Electrical Engineering 430. Introduction to Statistical Communication 

Theory (3-0-3). 

Analysis and parameter estimation of random sequences and processes. Evaluation 
of standard modulation schemes in the presence of additive noise. Relationship of 
signal-to-noise ratio to maximum likelihood performance criteria. The Gaussian 
process and its special status. Prerequisite: Engineering 475, Electrical Engineering 
401. 

Electrical Engineering 442. Advanced Electronic Circuits (3-0-3). 

Electronic circuits used in communication and other systems including principles 
of feedback, modulation, detection, and active filtering. Emphasis is placed on design 
using integrated circuits. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 342. 

Electrical Engineering 460. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 
(3-4-4). 

Experimental foundations of quantum mechanics; solutions of Schroedinger's 
equation for the harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom; the exclusion principle; 
the hydrogen molecule; metallic binding; behavior of an electron in a periodic 
potential; the band theory of solids; quantum statistics. Prerequisite: Electrical 
Engineering 305. Laboratory fee required. 

Electrical Engineering 461. Electrical Properties of Materials (3-0-3). 

Atomic and crystal theory of electrical engineering materials. Properties and 
parameters of magnetic, dielectric, conducting, and semiconducting materials 
important in the understanding of device characteristics. 

Electrical Engineering 462. Solid-State Devices (3-4-4). 

A study of some of the important solid-state electronic devices, particularly 
semiconductor and ferromagnetic devices. Laboratory fee required. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 1 7 1 

Electrical Engineering 493. Electrical Engineering Projects (Credit to 
be arranged). 
Theoretical and experimental investigations under start direction. 

The following courses are normally open only to students engaged 
in a program leading to an advanced degree. 

Electrical Engineering 502. Network Synthesis (3-0-3). 

A study of both the theoretical and practical aspects of network synthesis. 
Emphasis will be on linear, passive electrical networks. Topics covered include: 
realizability, one-port synthesis, approximation methods, two-port synthesis and 
filter design, n-port theory, and selected topics of current interest. 

Electrical Engineering 505. Advanced Electromagnetic Field Theory 
(3-0-3). 

The mathematical techniques involved in field theortical calculations: Green's 
functions, variational methods, integral transforms, wave propagation through 
periodic structures, interaction of fields with charged particles. 

Electrical Engineering 506. Applications of Electromagnetic Field 

Theory (3-0-3). 

Applications of electromagnetic theory to plasma physics, microwave techniques, 
antennas and radiation of electromagnetic waves, ferrites, and quantum electronics. 

Electrical Engineering 507. Nonlinear Analysis (3-0-3). 

This course presents various nonlinear systems and the basic methods of non- 
linear analysis. Topics covered are: basic numerical methods, phase-plane, singular 
point analysis, limit qxles, stability, elliptic functions, perturbations, averaging, 
describing functions, and certain time-varying linear problems. Also offered as 
Mechanical Engineering 507. 

Electrical Engineering 517. Fundamentals of Nonlinear Systems (3-0-3). 

Intrinsic properties of nonlinear deterministic and random systems including 
stability, observability and controllability. An introduction to approximation theory 
and its application to nonlinear estimation. Also listed as Chemical Engineering 517, 
and Economics 527. 

Electrical Engineering 518. Fundamentals of Optimization Theory 

(3-0-3). 

A discussion of the mathematical problems encountered when searching for the 
best element in a given set. Existence and nonexistence of extrema. Introduction 
to linear, nonlinear, and dynamic programming, combinatorial prol)lenis, variational 
calculus, and optimal control theory. Also listed as Chemical Engineering 518 and 
Economics 528. 

Electrical Engineering 519. Advanced Mathematical Programming 
(3-0-3). 

Theory, computational methods, and applications of various advanced pro- 
gramming models are discussed. Topics include: nonlinear programming; Kuhn- 
Tucker theory; integer programming; network models; programming models subject 
to stochastic influences. Understanding of the simplex method is assumed. Also 
listed as Chemical Engineering 519 and Economics 529. Prerequisites: Electrical 
Engineering 518 or Economics 445 or equivalent. 

Electrical Engineering 521. Digital System Design (3-0-3). 

The principles of digital system design will be studied, as they pertain to 
computing instruments and to programming systems. Contemporary computing 
systems will be examined. 



172 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Electrical Engineering 522. Automata and Programming Theory 

(3-0-3). 

A general investigation of algorithmic processes. Topics considered will include 
the relation between algorithms and recursive function theory; the characterization, 
properties and capabilities of Turing machines and other abstract automata; and 
concepts and methods of algorithmic programming, including languages for the 
description of algorithms. 

Electrical Engineering 534. Statistical Signal Detection (3-0-3). 

Statistical theory of signal detection and its implications for signal design. Topics 
include the detection of narrow-band signals in communication systems, the 
resolution of radar signals, design of radar signals, and the selection of signals for 
communication channels. Prerequisite: a knowledge of Random Processes, Fourier 
Transforms. 

Electrical Engineering 535. Information Theory (3-0-3). 

A discussion of the problems posed by an information theoretic approach to 
digital communications, and a development of the analytic tools necessary to solve 
these problems. A basic knowledge of both algebra and probability is assumed. 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 430, 534. 

Electrical Engineering 562. Microwave Engineering (3-4-4). 

Review of waveguides and resonant cavities. The scattering matrix and applica- 
tions to 2-, 3- and 4-port devices. Principles of broadband transformers, couplers, 
and filters. Microwave generation. Tensor susceptibility and nonreciprocal devices. 
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 406. Laboratory fee required. 

Electrical Engineering 563. Introduction to the Solid-State (3-0-3). 

This course will provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts about 
crystalline solids, and provide the basic preparation for further courses in the se- 
quence EE 564-567. It will consist of the following: a brief review of Quantum 
Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics, a discussion of crystal structure, a study of the 
diffraction of waves by lattices and an introduction to the concept of the reciprocal 
lattice, classical and quantum-mechanical descriptions of lattice vibrations and the 
thermal properties of insulators, and the properties of electrons in solids including 
free-electron and band-theoretical approaches. Prerquisites: An introductory back- 
ground in wave mechanics and statistical mechanics, and concurrent enrollment in 
a graduate level quantum mechanics course is assumed. Also listed under same 
number in Departments of Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Electrical Engineering 564. Electron Transport and Superconductivity 
(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow EE 563. It will consider various aspects of electron transport, primarily 
from a microscopic viewpoint. Among topics to be covered will be various contribu- 
tions to electron scattering and some techniques for measuring the Fermi Surface. 
In addition, uU introduction to superconductively will be presented. Prerequisite: 
EE 563 or equivalent. Also listed under same number in Departments of Chemistry, 
Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Electrical Engineering 565. Dielectric & Optical Properties of Matter 

(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow EE 563. Topics included are: polarization and the static model of a 
dielectric medium in an electric field; extension of the above model to the dynamic 
case and dielectric dispersion in solids; Raman and Brillouin scattering; Optical 
spectra of solids; stimulated efTects with applications to lasers; the dynamics of the 
nonlinear interaction between radiation and matter. Prerequisites: EE 563 or equiva- 
lent. Also listed under same number in Denartments of Chemistry, Mechanical 
Engineering and Physics. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 173 

Electrical Engineering 566. Imperfections & Mechanical Properties 
(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow EE 563. Point defects in crystals, geometrical description of dislocations 
and the mathematics theory of lattice imperfections will be discussed. Non-thermal 
generation of point defects, physical observation of defects in crystals and special 
properties of lattice imperfections in metallic, ionic and homopolar crystals will be 
covered. How lattice imperfections in ionic, metallic and homopolar crystals affect 
certain physical properties of these crystals will be developed. The effects of lattice 
defects, particularly dislocations, upon the mechanical properties of crystals will be 
discussed. Prerequisites: EE 563, or equivalent. Also listecl under same number in 
Departments of Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Electrical Engineering 567. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance 
(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow EE 563. The basis of the magnetic properties of solids will be discussed. 
This will include diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, antiferromagne- 
tism, and ferrimagnetism. The phenomenon of magnetic resonance will be studied. 
This will include nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and 
ferromagnetic resonance. The emphasis will be on the atomic origin of magnetism 
and on a description of the elementary excitations of ordered magnetic materials. 
Prerequisite: EE 563 or equivalent. Also listed under same number in Departments 
of Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Physics. 

Electrical Engineering 580. Introduction to Bioengineering (3-0-3). 

This course will provide a quantitative understanding of the properties and 
interactions of those living systems now accessible to engineering concepts. Emphasis 
will be placed upon analysis, modeling and instrumentation of biological systems. 
Subjects covered include membrane phenomena and the nervous system, biological 
receptors, the dynamics of muscle contraction and the neuromuscular control system, 
and hemodynamics and the circulatory system. 

Electrical Engineering 593. Electrical Engineering Projects (Credit to 
be arranged). 
Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

Electrical Engineering 616. Control Systems II (3-0-3). 

Optimum design of control systems. Numerical methods. Stochastic approxima- 
tion. State and parameter estimation in stochastic systems. Stochastic optimization of 
linear systems. Topics in adaptive control. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 415. 

Electrical Engineering 622. Systems Programming (3-0-3). 

Design and implementation of programming systems for digital computers. 
Storage control and the representation of data structures, compilers and assembly 
programs. Operating systems for multi-programming, time sharing and interactive 
systems. The influence of system requirements on hardware configuration. 

Electrical Engineering 623. Advanced Digital Components (3-0-3). 

Generation and distribution of nanosecond pulses. Structure of high speed 
arithmetic units. Piped, staged, and streamed data flow. Detailed analysis of particu- 
lar high speed logic elements. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 421 or equivalent. 

Electrical Engineering 624. Non-numerical Programming (3-0-3). 

Non-numeric applications of digital computers drawn from the current literature 
will be discussed. These may include theory and practice of mechanical proof con- 
struction, searches over finite sets, and the stabilization of real-time programs. 



174 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Electrical Engineering 645. Active Circuit Synthesis (3-0-3). 

The synthesis of active circuits is developed in detail. Work includes computer 
aided design and the effect of integrated circuits on design problems. 

Electrical Engineering 661. Semiconductor Electronics (3-0-3). 

Fundamental theory of semiconductor devices. The material of an introductory 
course in solid-state theory is assumed. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 648. 

Electrical Engineering 662. Ferromagnetic Theory and Devices (3-0-3). 

Theory of magnetism. Magnetostatics. Dynamic behavior of magnetic materials. 
Magnetic thin films. The material of an introductory course in solid-state theory is 
assumed. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 649. 

Electrical Engineering 666. Quantum Electronics (3-0-3). 

The development of the quantum mechanical techniques necessary to explain 
such devices as the laser and maser. Energy level of ions and atoms. Interaction of 
electromagnetic fields with ions and atoms. Microwave masers. Solid state, gaseous, 
and semiconductor laser operation. Prerequisites: Electric Engineering 560 and 605. 

Electrical Engineering 669. Direct-Energy Conversion Devices (3-0-3). 

Thermoelectric and thermomagnetic engines, thermionic converters; radiant 
energy converters; magneto hydrodynamic converters; fuel cells; ferroelectric energy 
conversion. 

Electrical Engineering 690. Research and Thesis (Credit to be ar- 
ranged). 

Electrical Engineering 691-699. Seminars on Advanced Topics (Credit 
to be arranged.) 
Descriptions published each year in separate memoranda. 



Environmental Science and Engineering 

Professor Busch, Chairman 
Associate Professors Leeds and C. H. Ward 

The Environmental Science and Engineering Program is an inter- 
departmental activity and offers the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Applicants for admission to this interdepart- 
mental program may hold the baccalaureate or masters degree in any 
of the sciences, mathematics or engineering. 

The program serves as the focal point for university-wide study 
and research in the broad man environment problem spectrum. The 
participation of faculty members from the departments of Chemical 
and Electrical Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Geology, Econom- 
ics and Psychology indicates the extent of this interdisciplinary activ- 
ity. Graduate students enrolled in any of these departments and in- 
terested in environmental problems for thesis topics may use facilities 
of the Environmental Science and Engineering Program and are eligi- 
ble for financial assistance in the form of graduate traineeships. 

Candidates for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy de- 
gree may pursue a course program designed both to complement and 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 1 75 

supplement their background. This is accomplished through major 
and minor emphasis areas although formal minors are not required. 
University requirements for the advanced degrees are presented on 
pages 99-104. 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree must complete a min- 
imum of eight approved one-semester courses and present and de- 
fend, in oral examination, a research thesis. Normally two academic 
years and the intervening summer are required for the degree. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must demon- 
strate his competence in three areas through qualifying examinations. 
The areas of competence may be selected as commensurate with the 
candidate's major and minor course emphases. The thesis must docu- 
ment and be defensible evidence of the candidate's ability to do orig- 
inal research in a specialized phase of Environmental Science and En- 
gineering. 

COURSES 

The majority of courses taken by students of Environmental Sci- 
ence and Engineering are those offered in other departments. 

Environmental Engineering 536a,b. Synthesis of Water Quality Sys- 
tems I and II (3-0-3 each sem.). 

The theory of the operations and processes used in water and waste-water treat- 
ment and the synthesis of systems for accomplishment of a specified water-quality 
objective. 

Environmental Science and Engineering 600a,b. Seminar. 

Environmental Science and Engineering 641a,b. Advanced Topics 
(3-0-3 each sem.). 

Consideration of new concepts in analyzing problems of the environment. Dis- 
cussion of current literature from several disciplines of pertinence. Interpretation of 
current research. 

Environmental Science and Engineering 650a,b. Research and Thesis. 



Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 
and Materials Science 

Professors Beckmann, Brotzen, Chapman, Chairman, Cheatham, 

Mackay, Miele, and Wilhoit 

Visiting Professor Schoeck 

Associate Professors Ingram, Roberts, Rudee, and Wierum 

Assistant Professors Bowen, Huang, McLellan and 

W. F, Walker 

Instructor Miller 

Requirements for the degrees in Bachelor of Aits with a major in 
Mechanical Engineering and Master of Mechanical Engineering are 
summarized on pages 57-59. Representative courses and normal se- 



176 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

quence of registration in courses during the student's undergraduate 
years are available from the department. 

It is recommended that students contemplating a major in mechan- 
ical engineering take Engineering 211a, 212b, Engineering 240a, 241b, 
and Engineering 200b among their electives in the Sophomore year. 
However, schedule adjustments may be made in the Junior and Se- 
nior years to permit those students who do not take all these courses 
as Sophomores to major in mechanical engineering without suffering 
the penalty of taking additional courses. 

After completing four years of his curriculum, the student receives 
a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in mechanical engineering. 
Upon application and upon evidence of satisfactory achievement, the 
student may enter the fifth-year program leading to the professional 
degree Master of Mechanical Engineering. 

Qualified graduates of other universities desiring the additional 
professional training offered by advanced level course work may 
apply to the Committee on Professional Master's Degree for admis- 
sion to the above program leading to the Master of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Students completing the four-year Bachelor of Arts program, or 
qualified graduates of other universities, having special interests in 
research may, upon recommendation of the Department and approval 
of the Graduate Council, enter the graduate program leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The general 
University requirements for these degrees are outlined on pages 
99-104. Specific course requirements are variable, depending upon 
preparation, performance on qualifying examinations, etc., and may 
be obtained from the Department office. 

The research interests of the mechanical engineering faculty and 
the laboratory research equipment available provide the following 
areas of specialization: (1) Engineering Mechanics; (2) Materials Sci- 
ence; (3) Fluid Dynamics, Gas Dynamics, Heat Transfer; (4) Aero-as- 
tronautics. 

COURSES 

Mechanical Engineering 313. Advanced Engineering Mechanics (3-0-3). 

Continuation of Engineering 211 and 212 with emphasis on applications of 
energy methods in dynamics. Variational methods are used in the study of particle 
and rigid-body dynamics, electric circuits, electromechanical systems, and continuous 
dynamics systems. Mr. Cheatham 

Mechanical Engineering 380. Introduction to Engineering Statistics 

and Economics (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the analysis of engineering prolilems by statistical and eco- 
nomic means. Topics discussed include basic probability theory, distributions, sta- 
tistical decision making and significance tests, regression techniques, analysis of 
variance, quality control, and interest rate problems. 

Mechanical Engineering 381. Industrial Processes Laboratory (0-3-1). 

A laboratory pioviding practical experience in and observation of selected in- 
dustrial production processes. Laboratory fee required. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 177 

Mechanical Engineering 390. Production Metallurgy (3-3-4). 

Class and laboratory instruction in the processes utilized in the production of 
metals. A study is made of the chemistry and thermodynamics of the reactions 
involved in ore concentration and in the extraction, refining, and alloying of 
metals. Laboratory fee required. 

Mechanical Engineering 395. Materials Science (3-3-4). 

An introductory course in the science of solid materials, covering not only 
metals, but also ceramics, plastics, and semiconductors. The basic understanding of 
the nature of solid materials will be stressed. The subject matter is approached 
from both the atomic and macroscopic points of view. Prerequisites: Physics lOOa.b, 
200a, Chemistry 120a, b. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Brotzen 

Mechanical Engineering 401. Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A fundamental and rigorous exposition of the laws of classical thermodynamics. 
The various deductions that mav be made from these laws are discussed and their 
physical significance is emphasized. Applications of these principles to systems of 
physical significance in various disciplines are made. Particular attention is directed 
to the applications of these principles to pure substances and the interrelations be- 
tween their thermodynamic properties. Mr. Chapman 

Mechanical Engineering 404. Applications of Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A course which stresses the applications of classical thermodynamics to systems of 
particular interest in mechanical and aerospace engineering. Energy conversion 
systems, refrigeration systems, psychometric principles, and thermodynamic applica- 
tions in compressible flow are treated. Mr. Walker 

Mechanical Engineering 405. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of High 
Velocity Fluid Flow (3-0-3). 

An introductory course which deals with the fundamentals of compressible fluid 
dynamics. A thorough treatment is given to one-dimensional flows with area change, 
normal shocks, friction, and heat addition. An introduction is made to multidimen- 
sional flows with special emphasis on perturbation theory, Prandtl-Meyer flow, and 
oblique shock waves. Mr. Walker 

Mechanical Engineering 406. Senior Laboratory I (0-3-1). 

This course provides laboratory instruction in several disciplines of interest. 
Selected experiments are performed in the field of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, 
strength of materials, and materials science. Laboratory fee required. Also offered 
as Civil Engineering 491. Messrs. Merwin and Plapp 

Mechanical Engineering 407. Senior Laboratory II (0-3-1). 

A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 406. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. Plapp 

Mechanical Engineering 483, Mechanical Design (3-0-3). 

The application of energy methods, buckling theory, and failure theories to 
problems of mechanical design. Considered are torsion theory, design of shafts 
and springs, shrink fits, flywheel problems, and power transmission elements such 
as cams and gears. Lubrication theory is also included. Mr. Cheatham 

Mechanical Engineering 501. Seminar I (1-0-1). 

A course devoted to the purpose of training engineering students in collecting 
and presenting orally formal papers on topics of engineering interest. The papers 
are given by the students, using materials secured from technical periodicals. The 
course meets weekly and is conducted in the form of a professional society meeting. 
Required of all mechanical engineering students in the year they are candidates 
for the Master of Mechanical Engineering. Staff 

Mechanical Engineering 502. Seminar II (1-0-1). 
A continuation of Mechanical Engineering SOL 



178 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Mechanical Engineering 507. Nonlinear Analysis (3-0-3). 

An introductory study of nonlinear systems and the various methods of analysis. 
Problems described by first and second order, driven and undriven equations giving 
rise to nonlinear oscillations and vibrations are covered. The basic topics of 
analysis are: basic numerical methods, phase-plane method, stability, exact analytical 
solutions, approximate analytical methods, perturbations, describing function, and 
certain time-varying linear problems. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 507. 

Mechanical Engineering 511. Elements of Continuum Mechanics I 

(3-0-3). 

An introduction to advanced topics in the mechanics of deformable media. Topics 
include tensor analysis, strain, stress, elasticity, plasticity, and fluid flow. 

Mr. Ingram 

Mechanical Engineering 512. Elements of Continuum Mechanics II 

(3-0-3). 

A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 511. Topics include variational and 
energy methods, thermoelasticity, viscoelasticity, irreversible thermodynamics, and 
finite deformation. Mr. Ingram 

Mechanical Engineering 521. Energy Conversion Systems (3-0-3). 

Applications of thermodynamics to the study of energy conversion systems of 
various forms, including reciprocating engines, gas turbines, ram jets, liquid- and 
solid-fuel rocket engines. A detailed treatment of thermochemical equilibrium as 
applied to the combustion process is given. Mr. Wierum 

Mechanical Engineering 522. Applied Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Ma- 
chinery (3-0-3). 

Applications of fluid mechanics in mechanical engineering. Drag and lift forces 
in two- and three-dimensional flows are analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on 
steady and nonsteady flow in pipes, gravity wave theories, and fluid machinery. 

Mr. Beckmann 

Mechanical Engineering 526. Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat 

Power Laboratory I (0-3-1). 

Advanced laboratory work in thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics, 
consisting of at least one small research project in addition to a number of tests 
of common items of equipment. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Plapp 

Mechanical Engineering 527. Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat 
Power Laboratory II (0-3-1). 
A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 526. Laboratory fee required. 

Mechanical Engineering 536. Introduction to X-ray Diffraction and 

Electron Microscopy (3-3-4). 

An introduction to the study of crystals by the diffraction of X rays. The theory 
of diffraction from a lattice is developed and applications to commonly encountered 
experimental techniques are discussed. In addition, chemical analysis by fluorescence 
and direct observation of lattice defects by electron microscopy are presented. 
Laboratory fee required. Mr. Rudee 

Mechanical Engineering 541. Physical Metallurgy (3-3-4). 

A study of the fundamentals of solidification, alloying, and heat treatment. The 
mechanical and nonmechanical properties of metallic systems are discussed from 
atomic and electronic theory. Structural changes in metals accompanying various 
basic forming processes are described. An introduction to the oxidation and cor- 
rosion of metals. Laboratory experiments will complement the course work and 
include experiments for example on X-ray diffraction and resistivity. Laboratory fee 
required. Mr. Roberts 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 179 

Mechanical Engineering 542. Nonmetallic Materials (3-34), 

The mechanical and physical properties of nonmetallic materials. Laboratory 
work usually consists of a semester project in one particular phase of the study of 
nonmetallic materials or physical metallurgy. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. McLellan 

Mechanical Engineering 561. Advanced Metallurgical Laboratory I 

(0-4-1). 

Students whose interest lies primarily in the field of materials and metallurgy 
are given the opportunity for research in these fields. The students will be able to 
work on problems of a basic nature. Laboratory fee required. Sta(} 

Mechanical Engineering 562. Advanced Metallurgical Laboratory II 
(0-4-1). 
A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 561. Laboratory fee required. 

Mechanical Engineering 563. Introduction to the Solid-State (3-0-3). 

This course will provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts about 
crystalline solids, and provide the basic preparation for further courses in the 
sequence Mechanical Engineering 564-567. It will consist of the following: a brief 
review of Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics, a discussion of crystal 
structure, a study of the diffraction of waves by lattices, and an introduction to the 
concept of the reciprocal lattice, classical and quantum-mechanical descriptions of 
lattice vibrations and the thermal properties of insulators, and the properties of 
electrons in solids including free-electron and band-theoretical approaches. Pre- 
requisites: An introductory background in wave mechanics and statistical mechanics, 
and concurrent enrollment in a graduate level quantum mechanics course is as- 
sumed. Also offered as Chemistry 563, Electrical Engineering 563, and Physics 563. 

Stag 

Mechanical Engineering 564. Electron Transport and Superconduc- 
tivity (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Mechanical Engineering 563. It will consider various aspects of electron 
transport, primarily from a microscopic viewpoint. Among topics to be covered will 
be various contributions to electron scattering and some techniques for measuring 
the Fermi Surface. In addition, an introduction to superconductivity will be pre- 
sented. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 563 or equivalent. Also offered as 
Chemistry 564, Electrical Engineering 564, Physics 564. Mr. Rudee 

Mechanical Engineering 565. Dielectric & Optical Properties of Matter 
(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Mechanical Engineering 563. Topics included are: polarization and the 
static model of a dielectric medium in an electric field; extension of the above model 
to the dynamic case and dielectric dispersion in solids; stimulated effects with appli- 
cations to lasers; the dynamics of the nonlinear equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry 
565, Electrical Engineering 565, and Physics 565. Mr. Rabson 

Mechanical Engineering 566. Imperfections &: Mechanical Properties 
(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Mechanical Engineering 563. Point defects in crystals, geometrical 
description of dislocations and the mathematical theory of lattice imperfections will 
be discussed. Non-thermal generation of point defects, physical observation of 
defects in crystals and special properties of lattice imperfections in metallic, ionic 
and homopolar crystals will be covered. How lattice imperfections in ionic, metallic 
and homopolar crystals affect certain physical properties of these crystals will be 
developed. The effects of lattice defects, particularly dislocations, upon the me- 
chanical properties of crystals will be discussed. Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineer- 



180 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

ing 563 or equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry 566, Electrical Engineering 566 
and Physics 566. Messrs. Roberts and Estle 

Mechanical Engineering 567. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance 

(3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Mechanical Engineering 563. The basis of the magnetic properties of 
solids will be discussed. This will include diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferro- 
magnetism, antiferromagnetism, and ferrimagnctism. The phenomenon of magnetic 
resonance will be studied. This will include niiclear magnetic resonance, electron 
paramagnetic resonance, and ferromagnetic resonance. The emphasis will be on the 
atomic origin of magnetism, and on a description of the elementary excitations of 
ordered magnetic materials. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 563, or quivalent. 
Also offered as Chemistry 567, Electrical Engineering 567, and Physics 567. 

Mechanical Engineering 570. Mechanical Vibrations (3-0-3). 

Analysis of discrete and continuous vibrating systems. Approximate methods, in- 
tegral formulations, and transform method solutions. System response to random 
excitation, Mr. Cheatham 

Mechanical Engineering 581. Flight Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

General principles of kinematics, dynamics, aerodynamics, and propulsion neces- 
sary for the analytical developing of the theory of flight paths. Derivation of the 
equations of motion. Discussion of the properties of the atmosphere. Solution and 
discussion of problems of quasi-steady flight. Mr. Miele 

Mechanical Engineering 582. Flight Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Solution and discussion of problems of nonsteady flight. Performance and aero- 
dynamic heating of hypervelocity vehicles. Rocket vehicle performance with and 
without aerodynamic forces. Multistage rockets. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 656. Mr. Miele 

Mechanical Engineering 590. Heat Transfer (3-0-3). 

A general course of lectures and recitations from text covering a basic study of 
the laws of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Mr. Chapman 

Mechanical Engineering 593. Mechanical Engineering Problems. 

If conditions are favorable, mechanical engineering students may elect at least 
nine hours a week in approved investigations or design under the direction of a 
member of the staff. Staff 

Mechanical Engineering 600. Research and Thesis. 

Mechanical Engineering 601-605. Special Topics in Mechanical and 
Aerospace Engineering and Materials Science (Variable credit). 

Mechanical Engineering 607. Advanced Engineering Analysis (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the theory of the complex variable and a review of vector 
analysis with particular emphasis on engineering applications in the field of fluid 
dynamics, heat conduction, and elasticity. Mr. Plapp 

Mechanical Engineering 615. Advanced Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Dynamics of a particle, dynamics of a system of particles, Hamilton's principle, 
Lagrange's equations, orbit mechanics, and Hamilton's equations. Mr. ]Vilhoit 

Mechanical Engineering 617. Continutim Mechanics I (3-0-3). 

Advanced topics in continuum meclianics. Theory of constitutive equations. 
Theories of fading memory. Thermodynamics of materials with memory. Wave 
propagation in materials with memory. Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 511 
and 512. Mr. Bowen 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 181 

Mechanical Engineering 618. Continuum Mechanics II (3-0-3). 

Recent developments in continuum mechanics. Typical areas of study are the 
following: Irreversible Thermodynamics, Theories of Electromagnetic Interaction 
vvitli General Materials, Theories of Mixtures and Continuum Dislocation Theories. 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 617. Mr. Bowcni 

Mechanical Engineering 619. Wave Propagation I (3-0-3). 

A survey of the basic problems and solutions for acoustic, elastic, and electro- 
magnetic wave propagation. Topics include reflection and refraction at plane 
surfaces. Cagniard's method, the response of sytsems of localized sources, surface 
waves, and wave propagation in anistropic media are also considered. Mr. Ingram 

Mechanical Engineering 620. Wave Propagation II (3-0-3). 

Harmonic and generalized functional analysis. Application is made of transform 
techniques to the solution of problems concerning wave propagation in stratified 
media, plates, and cylinders. Diffraction and scattering are considered. A brief 
survey is made of wave propagation in plasma. Mr. Ingram 

Mechanical Engineering 625. Theory of Elasticity I (3-0-3). 

General analysis of stress and strain (in three dimensions) and stress-strain re- 
lation for an elastic continuum. The formulation of boundary-value problems, 
general theorems, and minimum principles are presented. Application is made to 
torsion and flexure of cylinders and to plane strain, plane stress, and generalized 
plane stress. Mr. Nordgren 

Mechanical Engineering 626. Theory of Elasticity II (3-0-3). 

Muskhelishvili's method and conformal mapping for two-dimensional elasto- 
static problems. Special formulation of three-dimensional problems, solutions by 
Green's function and transform techniques are presented. Thermoelasticity, vari- 
ational theorems, and related approximate methods are included. Prerequisite: 
Mechanical Engineering 625. Mr. Nordgren 

Mechanical Engineering 627. General Theory of Shells (3-0-3). 

Differential geometry of surfaces. General linear theory of bending of elastic 
shells of arbitrary shape. Discussion of various approximate theories. Solution of 
problems of technical interest by exact and approximate methods. Introduction to 
non-linear theories and stability problems. Also offered as Civil Engineering 612. 

Mechanical Engineering 628. Thoretical Plasticity (3-0-3). 

Formulation of basic laws of isotropic and anisotropic plastic flow; yield and load- 
ing surfaces, normality and convexity requirement, and hardening rules; plane 
plastic flow problems and slip-line field theory; introduction to limit analysis 
theorems. Also offered as Civil Engineering 615. 

Mechanical Engineering 629. Applied Plasticity (3-0-3). 

A study of the mechanics of inelastically deformed bodies; applied limit analysis 
and limit design; flexure and torsion of prismatic members; axially-s\mmetric prob- 
lems; shakedown and incremental collapse; elastically contained plastic deformation. 
Also offered as Civil Engineering 616. 

Mechanical Engineering 634. Thermodynamics of Alloys (3-0-3). 

A discussion of classical thermodynamics, the thermodynamic parameters charac- 
terizing liquid and solid solutions. Review of quantum and classical statistical 
mechanics, statistics of lattice interactions, magnetic systems, and vapors. Statistical 
mechanical treatment of phase equilibria. , Mr. McLellan 

Mechanical Engineering 635. Transformations in Alloys (3-0-3). 

Diffusion theory and the calculation of correlation coefficients for simple lattices. 
Thermal, self, and solute diffusion through metallic and ionic lattices. Diffusion- 
controlled transformations. Precipitation from supersaturated solid and liquid solu- 



182 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

tions. Order-disorder transformations. Shear transformations. Transformations oc- 
curring in the heat treatment of iron alloys. Mr. McLellan 

Mechanical Engineering 636. Diffraction in Nonideal Crystals (2-3-3). 

A course describing some of the techniques available for the study of defects in 
crystals by difTraction methods. Topics covered include diffraction contrast in 
electron microscopy, the analysis of the structure of deformed metals, and the de- 
tection of departures from randomness in solid solutions. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 536. Mr. Rudee 

Mechanical Engineering 644. Lattice-Imperfection Theory (3-0-3). 

Dislocations in otherwise perfect media: the geometry of dislocations in a con- 
tinuum, their stress fields, and interactions. Dislocations in real crystals (dislocation 
reactions, dislocation interaction with other crystal imperfections) and theories 
concerning the origin of dislocations. The presence and behavior of lattice vacan- 
cies and interstitials in solids. Production of these defects by different methods in- 
cluding irradiation. Mr. Roberts 

Mechanical Engineering 645. Mechanical MetaUurgy (3-0-3). 

Elastic, plastic, and viscous behavior of metallic solids. The interpretation of 
mechanical behavior in terms of lattice-imperfection theory. Discussion of fracture, 
fatigue, creep, and damping in metals. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 644. 

Mr. Roberts 

Mechanical Engineering 648. Semiconductor Electronics (3-0-3). 

Fundamental theory of semiconductor devices. The material of an introductory 
course in solid-state theory is assumed. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 661. 

Mechanical Engineering 649. Ferromagnetic Theory and Devices 
(3-0-3). 

Theory of magnetism. Magnetostatics. Dynamic behavior of magnetic materials. 
Magnetic thin films. Magnetic tape cores. Device characteristics. The material of an 
introductory course in solid-state theory is assumed. Also offered as Electrical Engi- 
neering 662. 

Mechanical Engineering 654. The Calculus of Variation in Engineer- 
ing (3-0-3). 

Ordinary theory of maxima and minima. Calculus of variations in one inde- 
pendent variable. Calculus of variations in two independent variables. 

Mr. Miele 

Mechanical Engineering 655. Aerospace Applications of the Calculus 
of Variations (3-0-3). 

Optimum aerodynamic shapes at supersonic, hypersonic, and free-molecular flow 
velocities. Optimum trajectories for atmospheric flight. Optimum trajectories for 
extra-atmospheric flight. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 654. Mr. Miele 

Mechanical Engineering 660. Spacecraft Temperature Control Systems 
(3-0-3). 

A course emphasizing systems analysis and radiation heat transfer in the synthesis 
of thermal control systems. The material covered will include: the evaluation of 
the thermal environment in deep space and near planetary bodies; heat transfer 
from prime and extended surfaces in either radiative or convective environments; 
design of compact heat exchangers for use within spacecraft and external radiation 
exchangers; environmental and temperature control systems for manned or un- 
manned spacecraft; digital computer programs for making parametric studies of 
systems. Mr. MacKay 

Mechanical Engineering 661. Spacecraft Power Systems (3-0-3). 

A course applying principles of system theory and thermodynamics of power 
and refrigeration cycles. The material presented includes expendable fluid systems, 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 183 

fuels cells, energy storage systems, systems utilizing nuclear energy as a heat source, 
solar power systems, and mechanical refrigeration. Items affecting weight and size 
of the systems are studied in detail. Parametric methods are used to simplify the 
analysis. Mr. MacKay 

Mechanical Engineering 670. Advanced Thermodynamics (3-0-3). 

A continuation of the study of the principles of thermodynamics, including a 
thorough review of the fundamental concepts and laws, a detailed consideration of 
energy and its transformations and of equilibrium, and introduction to chemical 
thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Mr. Plapp 

Mechanical Engineering 673. Advanced fluid Dynamics I (3-0-3). 

Potential flow and other topics of classical fluid dynamics are extended to air- 
foil theory, ducted flow and free jets, and open-channel flow. Mr. Beckmann 

Mechanical Engineering 674. Advanced Fluid Dynamics 11 (3-0-3). 

This course emphasizes flow of viscous fluids. Primary attention is given to 
boundary-layer flow and to turbulent flow. Mr. Beckmann 

Mechanical Engineering 675. Special Applications of Fluid Dynamics I 
(3-0-3). 

Geostropic flows in meterology and oceanography are investigated and applied 
to secondary flow phenomena of laminar and turbulent character. Additional topics 
of greater interest include ocean wave spectra and their application to the statistics 
of turbulence. Mr. Beckmann 

Mechanical Engineering 676. Special Applications of Fluid Dynamics 
II (3-0-3). 

The theory of lubrication and wear, cavitation flow through porous media, 
transport of solids and gases in fluids, and other phenomena are emphasized. 

Mr. Beckmann 

Mechanical Engineering 682. Theory of Convective Heat Transfer 
(3-0-3). 

A thorough investigation of the processes of forced and free convection in lami- 
nar and turbulent flow, including a development of the basic equations describing 
these processes and a presentation of the principal cases for which they have been 
solved. Mr. Plapp 

Mechanical Engineering 683. Radiatative Heat Transfer (3-0-3). 

A course devoted to the transfer of thermal energy by radiant exchange bet^veen 
surfaces. Radiation properties of surfaces, including monochromatic, specular, and 
diffuse behavior. General enclosure theory, in the absence of participating gases. 

Mr. Chapman 

Mechanical Engineering 691. Advanced Gas Dynamics I (3-0-3). 

A detailed study of the physical and mathematical fundamentals of compressible 
fluid flows. Steady and unsteady flows in one, two, and three dimensions are con- 
sidered, as well as shock waves and other compressible gas dynamics phenomena. 

Mr. Walker 

Mechanical Engineering 692. Advanced Gas Dynamics II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of Mechanical Engineering 691. Mr. Walker 

Mechanical Engineering 696. Viscous Hypersonic Flow (3-0-3). 

This course develops the modern theories for laminar and turbulent boundary 
layers of reactive gas mixtures flowing at hypersonic speeds. Mr. Wierum 

Mechanical Engineering 697. Hypersonic Gas Dynamics (3-0-3). 

The gas dynamic effects which occur in flight at high Mach numbers are studied. 



184 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Detailed consideration is given to the theoretical techniques for analyzing hyper- 
sonic flows past slender, blunt, and blunt-nosed slender bodies. Mr. Wierum 

Mechanical Engineering 698. Physical Gas Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Both equilibrium and nonequililirium phenomena in the dynamics of high 
temperature gases are studies. Emphasis is placed upon the influence of atomic and 
molecular structure on the dynamical behavior of gaseous systems. Mr. Wierum 

Mechanical Engineering 699. Gas Dynamics of Radiant Media (3-0-3). 

The application of radiative transport theory to the physical problems of gas 
dynamics is studied. Detailed consideration is given to radiation energy transfer, 
the interaction of radiant energy with homogeneous matter, and the conservation 
equations of the gas dynamics of radiant media. Mr. Wierum 



English 



Professors Camden, Dowden, McKillop, Meixner, Parish, 

Spears, and Ward, Chairman 

Visiting Professor Jack 

Associate Professors Grob, Isle, and Thomas 

Assistant Professors Baker, Cox, Doughtie, Kelly, 

Minter, Morris, and Velz 
Lecturers, Barac, Barker, Johnson, and McMurty 

Requirements for a Major in English: Thirty-six hours (twelve 
semesters) in English, two semesters preferably to be English 250a 
and b, eight to be advanced; at least one semester each of the works 
of one major English author, English hterature before 1700, English 
literature from 1700 to 1900, American literature, and modern litera- 
ture; two semesters of advanced courses in French, German, or Latin; 
four semesters of collateral advanced courses approved by the depart- 
ment. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. Eight advanced 
semester-courses in English; the passing of a reading examination in 
French, German, or Latin; the satisfactory completion of a thesis; the 
passing of an oral examination. Two years are usually required to 
complete the work for this degree. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Prospective 
students are urged to take the Graduate Record Examination at the 
earliest opportunity and to consult the department well in advance 
of registration with regard to their qualifications and to the feasibil- 
ity of their plans for advanced studies in English. The awarding of 
the doctor's degree is not based on an accumulation of credits; the 
candidate is expected to show a comprehensive knowledge of the field 
and to prove his command of the processes and results of scholarship. 
The following requirements are minimal: sixteen advanced semester- 
courses in English, including those required for the degree of Master 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 185 

of Arts; a course in Old English or the history of the English lan- 
guage; the passing of a reading examination in two foreign lan- 
guages, usually French and German, before taking the preliminary 
examination; the passing of a preliminary examination, both written 
and oral, on the general field of English studies; the completion of a 
thesis which shall constitute an original contribution to knowledge 
and demonstrate the candidate's power of independent work; the 
passing of a final oral examination on the thesis and related fields. A 
graduate student is not admitted to candidacy for this degree until 
he has passed the preliminary examination. 

COURSES 

English 100a, b. Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing (3-0-3, 

each sem.). 

Special attention will be given to expository writing and to the study of literary 
forms. Staff 

English 240a. Modern and Ancient Narrative in Prose, Verse, and 
Drama (3-0-3). 
Classical and medieval Literature in translation (Homer to Dante). Mr. Thomas 

English 240b. Modern and Ancient Narrative in Prose, Verse, and 
Drama (3-0-3). 

World narrative (Cervantes to the present, including English and non-English 
drama, fiction, and verse.) Mr. Thomas 

English 250a, b. Masters of English Literature (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Readings in the major authors representative of the various periods. The back- 
grounds and a chronological history of English literature will be provided through 
lectures and supplementary reading. Recommended for all prospective majors in 
English. Mr. Grob 

English 260a, b. American Literature (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A survey of major American writers and literary movements. Not offered in 
1968-69. Staff 

English 300a. English Drama from the Beginning to Marlowe (3-0-3). 

The development of dramatic genres from the "quem quaeritis" to the 1590's in 
the light of medieval and classical traditions. Mr. Velz 

English 300b. English Drama from Ben Jonson to the Closing of the 
Theaters (3-0-3) 

A survey of the Jacobean and Caroline dramatists with special emphasis on themes 
and conventions. Mr. Velz 

English 310a, b. Modern British Poetry (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A survey of British poetry from 1890 to date, with special emphasis on major 
intellectual developments of the period as they have been reflected in the poetry. 

Staff 

English 320a, b. Approaches to Modern Drama (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Representative English, Continental, and American plays. (English 320a offered 
second semester only 1968-69; English 320b not offered 1968-69.) Mr. Thomas 

English 323a. Auden, Eliot, and Pound (3-0-3). Mr. spears 



186 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

English 325a. Conrad and His Contemporaries (3-0-3). Mr. Dowden 

English 325b. Twentieth-Century British Novel (3-0-3). 

English 330a, b. Advanced Writing (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The writing of essays, stories, plays, and novels. Time is given also to problems 
of marketing manuscripts. Stories are read and analyzed, and critical theories 
are discussed. Frequent conferences. Mr. McMurty and Mr. Williams 

English 340a, b. The English Novel (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Major novelists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. (May be taken in 
either or both semesters.) Mr. McKillop 

English 350a, b. The Romantic Period (3-0-3, each sem.). Mr. Dowden 

English 355a. Early Victorian Literature (3-0-3). 

Poetry and expository prose of the early Victorian period. Special attention will 

be given to Carlyle, Tennyson, and Bro^vning. Mr. Grob and Mr. Thomas 

English 355b. Middle and Late Victorian Literature (3-0-3). 

Poetry and expository prose of the middle and late Victorian period. Special 
attention will be given to Newman, Mill, Ruskin, Arnold, and Hopkins. 

Mr. Grob and Mr. Thomas 

English 360a. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (3-0-3). 
Not offered in 1968-69. 

English 366a. The Earlier Eighteenth Century (3-0-3). 

The Augustan Age (1700-1740), with emphasis on Swift and Pope. Mr. Battestin 

English 366b. The Later Eighteenth Century (3-0-3). 

The Age of Johnson (1740-1800), with emphasis on Dr. Johnson and his circle 
and on the literature of sentiment and sensibility. StaQ 

English 370a. Edmund Spenser and The English Renaissance (3-0-3). 

Mr. Doughtie 

English 370b. Survey of Sixteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

Non-dramatic literature from More through Shakespeare. Dr. Doughtie 

English 371a. Ballad and Folk-Song (3-0-3). 

British and American ballads and folk-songs, their influence on literary poetry, 
and their social implications. Mr. Doughtie 

English 371b. The English Lyric Before 1700 (3-0-3). 

The lyric as a genre; developments in convention and technique from the Middle 
Ages through Dryden. Mr. Doughtie 

English 375a, b. Late Nineteenth-Century and Early Twentieth-Cen- 
tury English Literature (3-0-3, each sem.). 
Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Thomas 

English 380a. Literature of the Renaissance (3-0-3). 

Mr. Parish and Mr. Baker 

English 380b. Milton and the Classical Tradition (3-0-3). 

Mr. Parish and Mr. Baker 

English 385a. Chaucer (3-0-3). 

The Romaunt of the Rose, Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde; selections 
from the Canterbury Talcs. Mr. Kelly 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 187 

English 385b. Middle English Literature (3-0-3). 

Representative works of Middle English drama and lyric poetry; the Alliterative 
Revival. About one-fourth of the course is devoted to Chaucer. Mr. Kelly 

English 390a. American Literature to 1850 (3-0-3). 

Special attention is given to Whitman, Dickinson, Clemens, and James. 

Mr. Ward 



Mr. Ward 



English 390b. American Literature 1850-1900 (3-0-3). 

Special attention is given to Whitman, Dickison, Clemens, and James. 

English 393a. Twentieth-Century American Fiction (3-0-3). 

A survey of main figures from 1900 to the present. Open only to Junjors and 
Seniors. Mr. Isle and Mr. Minter 

English 393b. Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3-0-3). 

A general survey of poetry in America from 1900 to the present. Open only to 
Juniors and Seniors. Mr. Isle and Mr. Minter 

English 395a, b. Life and Literature of the West and Southwest (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 
Not offered in 1968-69. Staff 

English 400a, b. Shakespeare (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A close study of certain of the comedies, histories, and tragedies, with lectures on 
the interpretation of these plays. (May be taken in either or both semesters.) 

Mr. Camden 

English 404a, b. Honors Seminar (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Open to students of hi;:^h standing having a principal interest in English oi 
other modem literatures. Opportunity for independent reading and research will 
be provided for a selected group who wish to develop individual abilities and sig- 
nificant interests. Papers embodying the results of research will be written. Staff 

English 440a. History of the English Language (3-0-3). 

The structure of Modern English. Mr. Cox 

English 440b. History of the English Language (3-0-3). 

Introduction to methods in historical linguistics via Old and Middle English. 
(440a prerequisite) Mr. Cox 

English 500. Topics in English and American Literary History. 

Graduate research and thesis for the degree of Master of Arts. Staff 

English 505a. Chaucer 3-0-3). 

A study of the complete poetical works and selected background materials. 

Mr. Kelly 

English 505b. Middle English Literature (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the Middle English lyric and drama; the Alliterative Revival; 
selections from 15-century authors. Special attention is given to allegory. Mr. Kelly 

English 510a, b. Old English (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Reading and critical study of Beowulf and other selected literary texts. Mr. Cox 

English 515a, b. Seminar in Sixteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3, each 
sem.). Miss Williams 

English 520a. Seminar in the Romantic Period: Wordsworth, Coler- 
idge (3-0-3). Mr. Grab 



188 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

English 520b. Seminar in the Romantic Period: Byron, Shelley, and 
Keats (3-0-3). Mr. Dowden 

English 530a. Bibliography and Methodology (3-0-3). 

The course is designed to acquaint students with the bibliographical guides and 
aids to literary research. Attention will also be given to methods of preparing 
papers, theses, and dissertations. Mr. Thomas 

English 535a. Literary Criticism; History (3-0-3). Mr. Dowden 

English 535b. Literary Criticism: Theory (3-0-3). Mr. spears 

English 545a. Victorian Literature (3-0-3). Mr. Grob 

English 545b. Victorian Literature (3-0-3). Mr. Grab 

English 550a, b. Shakespeare Seminar (3-0-3, each sem). Mr. Camden 

English 555a, b. Seminar in Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama each 
sem.). Mr. Camden 

English 560a, b. Eighteenth-Century Prose and Poetry (3-0-3, each 
sem.). Mr. Battestin and Mr. McKillop 

English 565a, b. The Eighteenth-Century Novel (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Mr. Battestin 

English 566a, b. The Nineteenth-Century Novel (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Stag 

English 570a. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

Mr. Baker and Mr. Parish 

English 570b. Milton Seminar (3-0-3). Mr. Baker and Mr. Parish 

English 573b. The Restoration (3-0-3). 

Dryden and the development of English neo-classicism (1660-1700), with readings 
in the historical, philosophical, and critical backgrounds of the period. 

Mr. Battestin 

English 575a, b. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century American Literature 

(3-0-3, each sem.). Mr. Ward 

English 580a, b. Directed Reading in English and American Literature 
(3-0-3, each sem.). Staff 

English 585a, b. Modern British Poetry (3-0-3, each sem.). Mr. spears 

English 587a, b. Seminar in Modern American Literature (3-0-3, each 
sem.). Mr. Isle 

English 600. Topics in English and American Literary History. 

Graduate research and thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Staff 

English 700. Summer Graduate Research. 

Open only to graduate students already admitted to study for an advanced de- 
gree. At least forty hours of library study and research per week. Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 189 



Fine Arts 

Professors Chillman and O'Neil, Chairman 

Associate Professor Parsons 

Visiting Associate Professor Camblin 

Visiting Assistant Professor Bang 

Instructor Staley 

Lecturers Badner, Brown, Havens, and Warren 

Visiting Lecturer Alhadeff 

Requirements for a Major in Fine Arts: Students are required to 
take at least six semester-courses in the history of art; eight are re- 
commended. In addition, two semesters of art studio courses at the 
300 or 400 level are a requirement; two semesters each of courses in 
either art studio or history of art are recommended. 

ART STUDIO COURSES 

Art 201a, 202b. Design (2-6-3, each sem.). 

The fundamentals of visual design; point, line, plane, value, color, shape, form, 
texture, and light. Open to all students. Mr. Camblin 

Art 225a, 226b. Drawing I (3-6-3, each sem.). 

An introduction to the problems of drawing, using various media: pencil, char- 
coal, pen-and-ink, brush-and-ink. Open to all students. 

Messrs. Parsons, Staley and Camblin 

Art 325a, 326b. Drawing II (3-6-3, each sem.). 

Continued study of drawing, with additional work in wash and other water 
media. Open to all students. Mr. Staley 

Art 411a, 412b. Graphic Arts (1-6-3, each sem.). 

Etching, lithography and other printmaking methods; both in black-and-white 
and in color. Prerequisite: Art 325. Mr. Staley 

Art 425a, 426b. Painting (1-6-3, each sem.). 

Problems of painting, both traditional and experimental, in various opaque 
media. Open to all students. Mr. O'Neil 

Art 435a, 436b. Sculpture (1-6-3, each sem.). 

Sculpture in clay, ceramics, metal, direct metal welding, and other sculptural 
media. Open to all students. Mr. Parsons 

Art 450a, 451b. Special Problems (1-6-3, each sem.). 

Advanced problems in painting or sculpture or printmaking with individual in- 
struction and criticism. Prerequisite: one year of course in the area in which 
advanced work will be done. Messrs. O'Neil, Parsons, Staley and Camblin 

HISTORY OF ART COURSES 

History of Art 205a, 206b. Introduction to the History of Art (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Paleolithic period to 
the twentieth century. Open to all students. Mrs. Brown 



190 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

History of Art 215a, 216b. Ancient Art (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Egypt, the Middle East, Greece, and Rome. Prerequisite: History of Art 205a, 
206b, or permission of instructor. Mr. Chillman 

History of Art 317a, 318b. Early Medieval, Byzantine, and Roman- 
esque Art (3-0-3). 
A survey of European architecture, sculpture and painting from the fourth to 

the twelfth century. OfTeied in alternate years; to be given in 1969-70. Mrs. Brown 

History of Art 319a, 320b. Gothic Art (3-0-3). 

A survey of European architecture, sculpture and painting, both religious and 
secvilar, from the mid-twelfth century to the early sixteenth century. Offered in 
alternate years; to be given in 1968-69. Mrs. Brown 

History of Art 345a, 346b. Modern Architecture (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Traces the evolution of modern architecture from the period of Romantic Classi- 
cism to the present. Particular emphasis upon developments after 1850, especially 
in America. Prerequisite: History of Art 205a, 206b, or permission of instructor. 

Miss Caldwell 

History of Art 355a. The Arts of Early America (3-0-3). 

A survey of the American Arts of the English colonies, from the 17th to the 
19th centuries, with particular emphasis on the decorative arts. Illustrative material 
from the Bayou Bend Collection will be utilized. Mr. Warren 

History of Art 415a, 416b. Renaissance and Baroque Art (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

The artistic expression of new perspectives and energies. Fall semester: Renais- 
sance Art. Spring semester: Baroque and Rococo Art. Prerequisite: History of Art 
205a, 206b, or permission of instructor. Mrs. Brown 

History of Art 450a, 451b. Key Monuments (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Masterpieces of architecture, sculpture, and painting. Examples are the Acropo- 
lis at Athens and the cathedral at Chartres. Lectures, discussion, and papers. Not 
primarily for Fine Arts majors, but open to Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students 
in other areas. Mr. Chillman 

History of Art 460a, 461b. The Nineteenth Century (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Survey of art in Europe and America from the late eighteenth century through 
Impressionism. Prerequisite: History of Art 205a, 206b, or permission of instructor. 

Miss Caldwell 

History of Art 475a, 476b. Twentieth-Century Painting and Sculpture 
(3-0-3, each sem.). 

Selective survey and discussion of principal phases of modern expression in 
Europe and America, from Post-Impressionism to the present. Prerequisite: History 
of Art 205a, 206b, or permission of instructor. Miss Caldwell 

History of Art 491-5. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Independent study or seminars concerned with various aspects of the history of 
art. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. Staff 

THEATER COURSE 

Theater 300a, 301b. Introduction to Theater (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of the form and structure of drama from Greek to modern. Special em- 
phasis on the analysis of plays from the viewpoints of the various theater artists: 
director, actor, and designer. Mr. Havens 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 191 



French 

Professors Bourgeois, Topazio, and Wadsworth, Acting Chairman 

Visiting Professor Lanure 

Associate Professors Hodges, Lecuyer, Raaphorst, and Shelton 

Assistant Professors Carrington, Curtis, and Tappan 

Undergraduates may major in French, and there is a graduate pro- 
gram in French leading to the degrees of Master of arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy. A fully equipped language laboratory is in operation, 
and laboratory work is an important part of the elementary courses 
in French. 

Undergraduate Majors. Students who intend to major in French 
should consult the section of this catalogue dealing with curricula 
and degrees to familiarize themselves with the University require- 
ments; they should also consult with one of the senior members of 
the department. At least eight of the courses offered in fulfillment of 
major requirements must be numbered 300 or higher; ten are recom- 
mended. Qualified upperclassmen are offered an opportunity to en- 
gage in independent work. All departmental majors and prospective 
majors must have their programs appoved by a representative of the 
department. 

Graduate Programs. Admission to graduate study in French will be 
granted to a limited number of qualified students. Evidence of quali- 
fication is a solid and distinguished undergraduate record in the 
study of French literature, and a capacity for independent work is 
also considered essential. The award of advanced degrees is not based 
solely on accumulation of credits or compliance with formal require- 
ments. Candidates are expected to attain a wide general knowledge 
of the appropriate history and literature and to demonstrate their 
command of the French language. In most cases two years will be 
required for the completion of work for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in French. 

(a) Completion with high standing of a program approved by the 
department; normally this will include 18 semester hours in 
advanced courses plus thesis work. 

(b) Passing a reading examination in one language other than 
French approved by the department. 

(c) Passing a preliminary oral examination in French on the French 
authors indicated in a reading list provided. 

(d) Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

(e) Passing a final oral examination. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in French. 
(a) Completion with high standing of a program approved by the 



192 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

department; normally this will include 48 hours of aedit, 
including those required for the degree of Master of Arts. 

(b) Passing a reading examination in two languages other than that 
of the candidate's specialization and approved by the depart- 
ment. 

(c) Passing a preliminary written and oral examination on the 
authors indicated in a reading list provided, and on the litera- 
ture, culture, and civilization of France. The oral examination 
may be taken only after the successful completion of the pre- 
liminary written examination. Knowledge of a second literature 
is required, and appropriate reading lists will be available. 
Note: Requirements (b) and (c) must be met at least a year 
before the submission of a dissertation. 

(d) Completion of a dissertation approved by the department: the 
dissertation is expected to represent an original contribution to 
knowledge. 

(e) Passing a final oral examination on the dissertation and related 
fields. 

Note: Regardless of the type of appointment held by the graduate 
student, he or she may be required to undertake research or 
teaching assignments, depending upon the background of the 
graduate student and the needs of the Department. 

COURSES 

French lOIa, 102b. Elementary French (3-2-4, each sem.). 

A close study of the fundamentals of French grammar and pronunciation. Exer- 
cises in written French. Oral practice, dictations, and translation of suitable texts. 
Language laboratory work required. Mr. Tappan and Staff 

French 110. French for Graduate Students (3-0-0). 

A rapid study of French grammar with special emphasis on syntactical diffi- 
culties encountered in the comprehension of the written language. (Noncredit 
course restricted to graduate students preparing for the giaduate language exami- 
nation.) Mr. Hodges 

French 201a, 202b. Intermediate French (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Emphasis on intensified oral, written, and translation practice. An introduction 
to some main currents in French literature. Readings of significant texts, composition, 
dictation, and conversation. Mrs. Raaphorst and Staff 

French 301a, 302b. French Civilization and Advanced Composition 

(3-0-3, each sem.). 

A thorough study of French manners as reflected in literature and in the arts. 
Phonetics. Oral and written reports in French. Mr. Shelton and Staff 

French 311a. Survey of French Literature (3-0-3). 

A comprehensive survey of the main currents in French literature from its be- 
ginning to the 19th century. Required for French majors. Recommended as back- 
ground for higlicr numbered courses in French literature. Mrs. Raaphorst and Staff 

French 312b. Survey of French Literature (3-0-3). 

A comprehensive survey of the main current in French literature from the 19th 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 193 

century to the present. Required for French majors. Recommended as background 
for higher numbered courses in French literature. Mrs. Raaphorst and Staff 

French 318. The Renaissance (3-0-3). 

A careful examination of the main intellectual and esthetic currents of the 
French renaissance with particular attention to Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel 
and Montaigne's Essais. To be given in 1969-70. Mr. Carrington 

French 321a. The Seventeenth Century (3-0-3). 

French poets, novelists, and moralists of the early seventeenth century, notably 
Malherbe, Corneille, Descartes, and Pascal. Mr. IVadswortn 

French 322b. The Seventeenth Century (3-0-3). 

French writers of the classical period, notably Moli^re, La Fontaine, La Roche- 
foucauld, Racine, Boileau, La Bruy^re, and Mme. de La Fayette. Mr. Tappan 

French 331. The Eighteenth Century (3-0-3). 

Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Baumarchais; also other selected 
authors. Mrs. Raaphorst 

French 351a. French Romantic Poetry and Novel (3-0-3). 

This course traces the development of the romantic movement through the 
novels of Chateubriand, Mme. de Stael, Constant, and George Sand, and the poetic 
works by Lamar tine, Hugo, Vigny, and Musset. Class analysis of texts and essays 
in French. To be given in 1969-70. Mr. Bourgeois 

French 352a. The Romantic Drama (3-0-3). 

A survey of the historical novel in France, followed by a thorough study of plays 
written by M^rim^e, Dumas, P^re, Hugo, Vigny, and Musset. Analysis of texts and 
essays in French. To be given in 1968-69. Mr. Bourgeois 

French 391. French StyHstics (3-0-3). 

A study of present-day French in the context of general linguistics. Some work 
in the laboratory may be required. To be given in 1969-70. Mr. Lecuyer 

French 392. French Phonetics and Diction (3-0-3). 

Practical application of the study of phonetics to the methods of learning and 
teaching French. Some work in the laboratory may be required. Mr. Lecuyer 

French 404. Directed Study and Senior Thesis (0-0-6). 

Open only to Senior students selected after application to the department. An 
extensive program of research is undertaken, after consultation, with approval of 
the department. A paper embodying the results of the research must be submitted. 
At least four advanced courses in French are prerequisites. 

French 411a. Introduction to Old French (3-0-3). 

Rapid presentation of the phonology and syntax of Old French. Selected readings 
from the principal literary genres of the medieval period. Mr. Tappan 

French 451a. French Realism and Naturalism (3-0-3). 

A thorough study of major novels by Stendhal and Balzac. Discussions and essays 
in French. Mr. Bourgeois 

French 452b. French Realism and Naturalism (3-0-3). 

A study of significant novels by Flaubert, Maupassant, Zola, Daudet, and the 
de Goncourt brothers. Discussions and essays in French. Mr. Bourgeois 

French 481b. Modern French Drama (3-0-3). 

A study of significant plays of Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh. Montherlant, Camus, 
and Sartre. Detailed study, discussion, and written analyses in French. Mr. LandrS 



194 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

French 482a. Modern French Novel (3-0-3). 

A study of major novels of Proust, Gide, Mauriac, Saint-Exup^ry, Camus, and 
others. Detailed study, discussion, and written analyses in French. Mrs. Raaphorst 

French 491. Special Topics (3-0-3). 

Qualified students may, on the recommendation of the Department, undertake 
a special research assignment. May be repeated for credit with the assignment of 
an additional topic. ^taO 

French 500. Graduate Research. 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

French 512b. Topics in Medieval Literature (3-0-3). 

An intensive study of one genre, author, or work of the medieval period. Pre- 
requisite: French 411a. To be given in 1969-70. Mr. Tappan 

French 517a. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be the poetry of Marot and the Ecole de Lyon. Mr. Carrington 

French 518b. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be Montaigne. Mr. Wadsworth 

French 526a. Seminar in Classical Prose and Poetry (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be La Fontaine and Boileau. Mr. Wadsworth 

French 527b. Seminar on Classical Drama (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be Racine. Mr. Tappan 

French 535a. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be Montesquieu and Diderot. Mr. Topazio 

French 536b. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be the eighteenth-century novel. Mr. Topazio 

French 555a. Seminar in Romanticism (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be Vigny. Mr. Bourgeois 

French 556b. Seminar on Victor Hugo (3-0-3). 

The poet, novelist, and leader of the Romantic School, to 1840. Mr. Landrd 

French 568b. Seminar in Realism and Naturalism (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be Stendhal. Mr. Bourgeois 

French 571a. Seminar in Modern Literature, to 1950 (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 will be Proust. Airs. RaapJiorst 

French 572b. Seminar in Modern Literature, to 1950 (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. The topic 
for 1968-69 to be announced. Mr. Landre 

French 577a. Seminar in Contemporary Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. Not offered 
in 1968-69. Mr. Lecuyer 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 195 

French 578b. Seminar in Contemporary Literature (3-0-3). 

The topic will change from year to year; may be repeated for credit. Not offered 
in 1968-69. Mr. Lecuyer 

French 579. Studies in French Poetry (3-0-3). 

Problems of versification, imagery, and literary analysis. Mr. Wadsworth 

French 592. French and English Stylistics (3-0-3). 

A study of the characteristics of the French and English languages and of their 
differences with application to the problems of composition and translation. 

Mr. Lecuyer 

French 595. Special Topics in French Literature (3-0-3). 

This course is designed to fill particular lacunae in a doctoral candidate's pro- 
gram. Subjects would therefore change according to specific needs of students. Can 
be repeated for credit since topics would change. Sta0 

French 600. Graduate Research. 

Graduate research and dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 



Geology 



Professors Adams, Chairman, 

Croneis, De Bremaecker, Rogers, and J. L. Wilson 

Associate Professors D. R. Baker, Burchfiel, Heymann, 

AND Lankford 

Assistant Professors Clark and Warme 

Visiting Lecturer Nettleton 

In January, 1952, Mrs. Olga Wiess provided an endowment fund 
to establish the Harry Carothers Wiess Chair of Geology as a memo- 
rial to her husband. As a result, the Department of Geology was 
created, and a full program of courses in the subject is being offered. 
The first Senior class in geology was graduated in June, 1955, and 
the first doctorate was awarded in June, 1958. A geology laboratory, 
completed in June, 1958, provides ample space and facilities for un- 
dergraduate and graduate instruction and research. 

Until June, 1964, all geology majors were in the science-engineer- 
ing program; beginning in the 1964-65 academic year, however, it has 
been possible for students to major in geology in either the science- 
engineering or the academic programs. 

Undergraduate Requirements. In addition to the satisfaction of the 
general requirements of the science-engineering or academic pro- 
grams, undergraduate majors in geology are expected to complete the 
following courses: 

Geology 200a, 201b ordinarily taken in the Sophomore year, but 
may be delayed to the Junior year. 

Geology 310a, 330a, 310b, 331b taken in the Junior year. 



196 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Geology 400a, 401b taken in the Senior year 

One to two year-courses (two to four semester-courses) of approved 
geology electives 

Geology 390 or other approved summer field course; ordinarily 
taken in the summer between the Junior and Senior years. 

An honors program open to undergraduate majors was initiated in 
the spring of 1967. In addition to the required six-week summer field 
course, honors students will be involved in an extended field problem 
for the remainder of the summer preceeding their Senior year, the 
results to be submitted as a Senior Honors Thesis. 

Graduate Requirements. Students with a bachelor's degree in geol- 
ogy or related sciences from Rice University, or an equivalent degree 
from another institution of similar standing, are considered for ad- 
mission to graduate work. 

Graduate work is conducted in those specialties that are compati- 
ble with the equipment available and with the interests of the staff. 
At present, the Department of Geology is prepared to offer advanced 
work in geochemistry, geophysics, igneous and metamorphic petrol- 
ogy, marine geology, meteoritics, stratigraphy, sedimentation, sedi- 
mentary petrology, structural geology, and paleontology, micropaleon- 
tology, and paleoecology. Graduate work in geology is oriented to- 
ward the theoretical and fundamental aspects of the subject rather 
than directly toward its many applied aspects. 

Candidates for advanced degrees in geology will be expected to: 

(1) Pass a reading examination in one foreign language for the 
master's degree; German is ordinarily required, but the Geology 
Department may permit the substitution of French in some 
cases. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must pass reading exami- 
nations in two languages, one of which must be German. 

(2) Complete at a high level an approved program of graduate 
courses in geology and related subjects. This program may 
include an advanced field course and undergraduate courses in 
certain supporting sciences, such as mathematics (calculus), 
chemistry, physics, and biology. Prospective students with de- 
ficiencies in such supporting sciences will find their graduate 
program greatly accelerated by removing those deficiencies prior 
to enrolling for graduate work. 

(3) Pass a set of basic examinations in geology. These examinations 
are ordinarily given early in a student's graduate career and 
may at the discretion of the department, be repeated one or 
more times in whole or in part. Ph.D. candidates are expected 
to achieve higher scores than master's candidates. In some cases, 
specific examinations may be waived in lieu of high grades in 
related courses. 

(4) Complete for publication a thesis which represents an original 
contribution to the science. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 197 

(5) Pass an oral examination covering the candidate's research work 
and related phases of geology. 

(6) Engage in some laboratory instruction regardless of the type of 
appointment. This experience is considered an important and 
valuable part of graduate training, and every effort is made to 
give as great a variety of assignments as possible. 

Most graduate students can expect to spend two years beyond the 
bachelor's degree in order to complete requirements for the master's 
degree and an additional two years for the Ph.D. degree. Some stu- 
dents of very high ability may be allowed to bypass the master's de- 
gree and work directly for the Ph.D. 

COURSES 

Geology 200a. Physical Geology (3-3-4). 

An introduction to the study of the physical, chemical, and geological processes 
that produce rocks, economic deposits, and landforms. The laboratory includes exer- 
cises with advanced instrumentation, map and structure interpretation, and the 
identification of hand specimens of rocks and minerals. Prospective majors in geol- 
ogy are expected to have had Chemistry 120a,b, Physics lOOa.b, and Mathematics 
lOOa.b. Laboratory fee required. Messrs. Adams and Rogers 

Geology 201b. Historical Geology (3-3-4). 

An introduction to the study of the physical events of the ancient past from the 
birth of the earth through the most recent ice age, together with a synopsis of the 
concurrent changing patterns of life. The laboratory includes the analysis of geo- 
logical maps with emphasis on the structure of the stratified rocks and their organic 
remains. Prerequisite: Geology 200a or consent of the department. Laboratory fee 
required. Mr. Lankford 

Geology 310a. Mineralogy (3-4-4). 

Basic introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, systematics and classifica- 
tion, physical and chemical properties, distribution, occurrence, and genesis of 
minerals. Laboratory work stresses modern techniques and procedures of determina- 
tive mineralogy including optical mineralogic methods utilizing the polarizing micro- 
scope. The common rock-forming minerals receive principal emphasis. Laboratory 
fee required. Mr. Baker 

Geology 310b. Petrology (3-6-5). 

Description and interpretation of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. 
Laboratory work emphasizes the study of rock thin sections with the petrographic 
microscope. Mr. Rogers 

Geology 320a. Environmental Geology (3-0-3). 

A study of the early inorganic evolution of terrestrial conditions favorable for 
life, the mechanisms by which life adjusted to these conditions and the ways in 
which man's activities, including pollution, are changing these conditions and the 
mechanisms of adjustment. Mr. Adams 

Geology 32 lb. Mineral Resources (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the study of the geology, origin, and general economics of 
mineral and fuel deposits. Topics for study include the analysis of significant 
occurrences and methods of exploration. Prerequisite: Consent of the department. 

Mr. Adams 

Geology 330a. Structural Geology (34-4). 

Introduction to structural geology and field methods. Topics covered include de- 



198 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

scription of faults, folds, and other structural features, field methods for recognizing 
and interpreting structures, mechanics of rock deformation, and elementary tectonics. 
Laboratory work involves descriptive geometry, plane table surveying, aerial photo- 
graph interpretation, and preparation of geologic maps. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. Bruchfiel 

Geology 331b. Sedimentation (3-3-4). 

Introduction to the study of sedimentary rocks. Emphasis is placed on the processes 
of weathering, transportation, and deposition and on the petrographic attributes of 
the more important types of sedimentary rocks. Laboratory work is concerned largely 
with sedimentation analyses and the description of hand specimens and thin sec- 
tions. Prerequisite: Geology 310a. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Lankford 

Geology 390. Field Geology. 

In addition to the various shorter field trips conducted in connection with a 
number of the geology courses taken in residence, a summer field course of not 
less than six weeks is required of all majors. The work may be taken at any one 
of several approved university field stations during the summer prior to the Senior 
year. Credit variable. Laboratory fee required. 

Geology 400a. Invertebrate Paleontology (34-4). 

An introduction to the morphology and geological record of the major inverte- 
brate groups characterized by significant fossil representation. Brief consideration of 
principles of evolution, paleoecology, correlation, and stratigraphic nomenclature. 
Laboratory fee required. Messrs. Warme and Wilson 

Geology 401b. Stratigraphy and Advanced Historical Geology (3-4-4). 

Principles of stratigraphy and correlation problems. Stratigraphic and paleo- 
tectonic development of North America and Europe. Use and interpretation of 
thickness and facies maps and cross sections. Laboratory consists of suites of fossils 
and rock types characteristic of various geologic periods. Prerequisite: course in 
paleontology and sedimentation or approval of department. Laboratory fee required. 

Mr. Wilson 

Geology 405a. Micropaleontology (2-6-4). 

A microscopic study of the plant and animal remains commonly recoverable 
from drill cuttings. Principles underlying the use of such fossils in local and world- 
wide correlations. Prerequisite: Geology 401b or consent of the department. Labora- 
tory fee required. Mr. Lankford 

Geology 411b. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3-4-4). 

Development of the basic principles of igneous and metamorphic petrology. Em- 
phasis is placed on the application of physical chemistry and experimental petrology 
for the elucidation of classical field and petrographic relationships. The origin and 
evolution of major petrologic types is discussed. Laboratory work involves petro 
graphic study of selected suites of important rocks. Prerequisite: Geology 310a, b. 
Laboratory fee required. Mr. Bakei 

Geology 418a. Marine Geology (3-3-4). 

A study of the major components of modern ocean basins and margins including 
their sediments, sedimentary environments, marine processes, and interpretations of 
bathymetry, structure, and history. The course will include field trips along the 
Gulf Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. Prerequisites: Geology 330a and 331b. Lab- 
oratory fee required. Mr. Lankford 

Geology 440a. Introduction to Geophysics (3-4-4). 

A consideration of the gravitational, magnetic, thermal, electromagnetic, and 
seismic properties of the solid earth. Potential theory is introduced. Geophysical 
observations of tlie earth's crust and interior are interpreted in terms of physical 
principles. Laboratory fee is required. Mr. Clark 

Geology 455a, b. Geochemistry (3-4-4, each sein.). 

A study of the geological and chemical processes that produced tlie observed 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 199 

distribution and abundances of the elements. The age, formation, and heat balance 
of the earth are some of the topics discussed from a geochemical viewpoint. 
Laboratory work includes both wet chemical and modern instrumental determina- 
tions of major and trace elements in rocks and minerals. Prerequisite: Geology 3I0a 
and consent of the department. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Adams 

Geology 480. Research in Geology. 

Advanced work adapted to the needs of the individual student. Credit variable. 
Laboratory fee required. 

Geology 490. Recent Advances in Geology. 

A study of recent research in specific fields under the guidance of a member of 
the staff. Credit variable. Laboratory fee required. 

Geology 500. Special Studies. 

Advanced work in certain phases of geology, adapted to the needs of individual 
graduate students. Registration permitted only with consent of the department. 
Credit variable. 

Geology 510-518. Seminars in Geology. 

Courses covering the subjects listed in sequence under geology research courses 
numbered 590 to 598. Individual seminars may cover different topics in different 
years and may be taken more than once. All seminars three units per semester. Staff 

Geology 520a, b. Geophysics (3-4-4, each sem.). 

Gravity, magnetism, paleomagnetism, potential theory, heat flow, elasticity, and 
elastic waves theory. Emphasis is on the principles and the mathematical physics. 
Laboratory work is concerned with applications of the methods. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of the department. Laboratory fee required. Messrs. De Bremaecker and Clark 

Geology 525b. Organic Geochemistry (3-0-3). 

A study of the application of the principles and procedures of organic chemistry 
to geologic problems. The nature and classification of naturally occurring carbona- 
ceous substances is reviewed. Emphasis is given to major problems of organic 
geochemistry such as the evolution of petroleum and other fossil fuels; the nature, 
distribution, and origin of organic substances in sediments and sedimentary rocks; 
the geochemical cycle of carbon; the recognition of biochemical substances in ancient 
rocks and meteorites; and the use of organic constituents for deciphering the 
physical, chemical, and biological history of rocks. Mr. Baker 

Geology 530a. Advanced Sedimentary Petrology (3-4-4). 

A survey of sedimentary processes (weathering, transportation, deposition, and 
diagenesis) and sedimentary rocks. Selected topics will be studied in the fields of 
sedimentary mineralogy, lithofacies analysis and environmental interpretation, and 
tectonic sedimentation. Laboratory work includes sedimentation analysis and thin 
section study of sedimentary rocks. Messrs. Lankford, Baker, and Wilson 

Geology 531b. Advanced Topics in Petrology (3-0-3). 

A study of major problems of igneous and metamorphic petrology. Topics 
include origin of magmas, the granite problem, basalts, and volatiles in silicate 
systems. Topics will vary from year to year. Mr. Rogers 

Geology 540b. Statistical Geology (3-3-4). 

Fundamentals of statistical analysis and their application to geologic problems. 
Topics covered include sampling distributions, comparison of means and variances, 
correlation and regression, chi-square analysis, variance analysis, and handling of 
multiple sets of data. Mr. Rogers 

Geology 550a, b. Chemical Geology (3-34, each sem.). 

Survey of physical chemistry and its applications to geologic studies. Topics 
covered include basic thermodynamics, phase equilibria and solution chemistry, 
reaction kinetics, crystal chemistry, and crystal growth. Mr. Heymann 



200 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Geology 555a. Advanced Topics in Geochemistry (3-3-4), 

A study of selected topics, particularly radiometry, isotope and trace element 
analysis and interpretation. Mr. Adams 

Geology 555b. Radiogeology (3-4-4). 

The detection and quantitative determination of natural and artificial radio- 
active nuclides with particular emphasis on the geologic mechanisms of mobilization, 
transportation, and fixation in the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biota. 
Alpha, beta, and gamma detection in the field and laboratory, as well as alpha 
and gamma pulse-height analysis in the laboratory, are considered in both theory 
and practice. Gamma spectrometry in the field is also included. The biological 
and health aspects of the radiation environment are discussed. 

Mr. Adams and others 

Geology 560a, b. Advanced Topics in Geophysics (3-3-4, each sem.). 

Study of selected topics in geophysics, including seismology, gravitation, and 
geomagnetism. Messrs. De Bremaecker and Clark 

Geology 566a, b. Advanced Tectonics (3-3-4, each sem.). 

Mechanics of rock deformation and its relation to field observations and an 
understanding of faulting, folding, and minor structures. Study of selected structural 
problems and regional tectonics. Mr. Burchfiel 

Geology 582b. Meteoritics (3-0-3). 

A study of the composition, structure, ages, and origin of meteorites with special 
emphasis on the implications for the history of the solar system. The course will 
include a discussion of experimental methods in cosmochemistry. Mr. Heymann 

Geology 590. Research in Physical and Structural Geology (0-9-3). 

Messrs. Burchfiel and De Bremaecker 

Geology 591. Research in Mineralogy (0-9-3). 

StaQ 

Geology 592. Research in Petrography and Petrology and in Carbonate 
Geology (0-9-3). 

Messrs. Rogers and Wilson 

Geology 593. Research in Geochemistry and Meteoritics (0-9-3). 

Messrs. Adams, Baker, and Heymann 

Geology 594. Research in Geophysics (0-9-3). 

Messrs. De Bremaecker and Clark 

Geology 595. Research in Invertebrate Paleontology and Stratigraphy 
(0-9-3). 

Messrs. Croneis, Lankford, Warme and Wilson 

Geology 596. Research in Economic and Petroleum Geology (0-9-3). 

staff 

Geology 597. Research in Regional Geology (0-9-3). 

staff 

Geology 598. Research in Marine Geology (0-9-3). 

Mr. Lankford 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 201 



Germanics 

Professor Kahn, Chairman 

Visiting Professor Malsch 

Associate Professors Koepke and Wilson 

Assistant Professors Copeland, Goodwin, Milburn, Puppe, 

Schubert, Stavenhagen and Winkler 

Instructors Christiansen, Klein, Slayton, Van Houten 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major in German. 

(a) Completion of a program approved by the department. 

(b) The equivalent of at least eight semester-courses in German 
numbered 300 or higher. 

(c) It is recommended that German majors take collateral courses 
in other literatures, history, and philosophy. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in German. 

(a) Completion with high standing of a program approved by the 
department; normally this will include eight graduate semester- 
courses. 

(b) Passing a reading examination in one foreign language other 
than German approved by the department. 

(c) Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

(d) Passing an oral examination based in part on a reading list 
provided by the department. 

(e) Passing a final oral examination on the thesis. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in German. 

(a) Completion with high standing of a program approved by the 
department; normally this will include sixteen graduate semes- 
ter-courses, including those required for the degree of Master 
of Arts. 

(b) Passing a reading examination in two foreign languages other 
than German approved by the department. 

(c) Passing a preliminary written and oral examination on the 
general field of Germanic studies: this examination will be based 
in part on a reading list provided by the department. 
Note: Requirements (b) and (c) must be met at least a year 
before the submission of a dissertation. 

(d) Completion of a dissertation approved by the department; the 
dissertation is expected to represent an original contribution to 
knowledge. 

(e) Passing a final oral examination on the dissertation and related 
fields. 

As part of their training graduate students, regardless of the type 



202 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

of appointment, will be required to perform some duties, such as 
assisting in classes, the language laboratory, research, and other ac- 
tivities suggested by the department. 

COURSES 

German 101a, 102b. Elementary German (4-1-4, each sem.). 

Grammar, conversation, and extensive reading. Language laboratory work 
required. Staff 

German Ilia, 112b. German for Graduate Students (3-0-0, each sem.). 

A noncredit course in German, restricted to graduate students preparing for the 
graduate language examination. The course stresses grammar. Staff 

German 201a. Intermediate German (3-1-3). 

Grammar, conversation, and extensive reading. Language laboratory work 
required. Staff 

German 202b. Intermediate German: Scientific (3-0-3). 

The course emphasizes readings in scientific German. Prerequisite: 201a. Staff 

German 204b. Intermediate German (3-0-3). 

The course stresses readings in literature. Prerequisite: 201a. Staff 

German 301a. Advanced Scientific German (3-0-3). 

German composition and conversation based on scientific texts. 

German 302b. Advanced Scientific German (3-0-3). 

The continuation of the above. Prerequisite: 30 1 a or permission. 

German 305a. Composition and Conversation (3-0-3). 
The work will be based on literary texts. 

German 306b. Composition and Conversation (3-0-3). 
The continuation of the above. Prerequisite: 305a. 

German 311a. Storm and Stress (3-0-3). 

The course deals with the theories and literature of Preromanticism. Offered in 
alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Kahn 

German 312b. Schiller (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Kahn 

German 321a. Nineteenth-Century Dramatists (3-0-3). 

The course emphasizes the works of Grillparzer, Biichner, and Hebhel. Offered 
in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Milburn 

German 322b. Twentieth-Century Dramatists (3-0-3). 

The course emphasizes the works of Wcdekind, Brecht, and Diirrenmatt. Offered 
in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Milburn 

German 331a. Survey of German Literature (3-0-3). 

From the beginnings until the eighteenth century. Offered in alternate years: 
given in 1969-70. Mr. Winkler 

German 332b. Survey of German Literature (3-0-3). 

From the eighteenth century to the present. Offered in alternate years: given 
in 1969-70. Mr. Winkler 



Mr. 


Wilson 


Mr. 


Wilson 




Staff 




Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 203 

German 341a. Romanticism (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Lehnert 

German 342b. From Romanticism to Realism (3-0-3). 

The course includes the study of Holderlin, Heine, and Morike. Offered in 
alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Lehnert 

German 351a. German Literature, 1850-1900 (3-0-3). 

The course includes the study of Marx, Stifter, Keller, Wagner, and Nietzsche. 
Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Mitburn 

German 352b. German Literature, 1850-1900 (3-0-3). 

The course includes the study of Meyer, Nietzsche, Storm, Fontane, Freud, and 
naturalism. Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Milburn 

German 361a. Literature of the Enlightenment (3-0-3). 

The course emphasizes Lessing and his time. Offered in alternate years: given 
in 1968-69. Mr. Winklei 

German 362b. Literature of the Enlightenment (3-0-3). 

The course emphasizes Klopstock and lyrical poetry. Offered in alternate years: 
given in 1968-69. Mr. Winkler 

German 371a. Hofmannsthal (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Lehnert 

German 372b. Thomas Mann (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Puppe 

German 381a. German Literature since 1900 (3-0-3). 

The course deals chiefly witli the poetry of Rilke, George, and Benn. Offered 
in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Puppe 

German 382b. German Literature since 1900 (3-0-3). 

The course treats primarily the prose writings of Kafka, Broch, and Doblin. 
Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Puppe 

German 391a. Goethe: 1749-1788 (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Kahn 

German 392b. Goethe: 1788-1832 (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Kahn 

German 401a. Independent Work: Special Topics in German Litera- 
ture or Philology (0-0-3). 
Independent work for qualified students: may be repeated for credit. StaQ 

German 402b. Independent Work: Special Topics in German Litera- 
ture or Philology (0-0-3). 
The same as the above: may be repeated for credit. StaQ 

German 411a. German Literature of the Renaissance and Reformation 
(3-0-3). 
Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Stavenhagen 

German 412b. German Literature of the Baroque (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Schubert 



204 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

German 500a, b. Graduate Research. 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 
degree of Master of Arts. 

German 501a, Seminar in the Literature of the Nineteenth and Twen- 
tieth Centuries (3-0-3). 

The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. 

Mr. Lehnert 

German 502b. Seminar in the Literature of the Nineteenth and Twen- 
tieth Centuries (3-0-3). 
The topics uill change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. The 

topic in 1968-69 will be problems in Franz Kafka. Mr. Lehnert 

German 503a. Special Topics in Germanic Philology (3-0-3). 

The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. The topic 
in 1968-69 will be Baroque lyric. Mr. Schubert 

German 504b. Special Topics in Germanic Philology (3-0-3). 

The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. The topic 
in 1968-69 will be history of the German language. Mr. Copeland 

German 505a. Seminar in Enlightenment, Classicism, and Romanti- 
cism (3-0-3). 
The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. The topic 

in 1968-69 will be Goethe, 1749-1788. Mr. Kahn 

German 506b. Seminar in Enlightenment, Classicism, and Romanti- 
cism (30-3). 

The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. The topic 
in 1968-69 will be Goethe, 1788-1832. Mr. Kahn 

German 507a. Special Topics in German Literature (3-0-3). 

The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. Sta§ 

German 508b. Special Topics in German Literature (3-0-3). 

The topics will change from year to year: may be repeated for credit. Staf] 

German 509a. Seminar in Bibliography, Research Problems, and Liter- 
ary Theory (3-0-3). 
The course treats problems in bibliography and literary research. Mr. Schubert 

German 510b. Seminar in Bibliography, Research Problems, and Liter- 
ary Theory (3-0-3). 

The course treats chiefly problems of literary theory and criticism. Mr. Winkler 

German 511a. Old Saxon (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Wilson 

German 512b. Old Icelandic (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Wihon 

German 521a. Gothic (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Wilson 

German 522b. Old High German (3-0-3). 

Offered in alternate years: given in 1968-69. Mr. Wihon 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 205 

German 531a. Middle High German (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the study of Middle High German. The Nibelungenlied will 
be read. Odered in alternate years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Stavenhagen 

German 532b. Middle High German (3-0-3). 

Emphasis will be placed on the Middle High German lyric. Offered in alternate 
years: given in 1969-70. Mr. Stavenhagen 

German 551a. Seminar in Modern Literature (3-0-3). 

Literarv problems of the early twentieth century. Offered in alternate years: 
given in 1969-70. Mr. Puppe 

German 552b. Seminar in Modern Literature (3-0-3). 

Literary problems of the twentieth century. Offered in alternate years: given in 
1969-70. Mr. Puppe 

German 600a, b. Graduate Research. 

Graduate research and dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 



Greek 

(See pages 137-138) 



Health and Physical Education 

Professors Hermance, Bearden, Chairman^ and Poindexter 

Assistant Professors Barker, Bland, Richardson, and Spence 

Lecturers Charlton and Griffiths 

Basic Health and Physical Education (101a, 102b Women) (103a, 104b 
Men) (0-4-0). 

a course to discuss the place and importance of health and physical education in 
our modern society, to teach the skills and knowledge of physical education 
activities, and to familiarize the students with the physical education facilities and 
equipment available to them at Rice University. Two-hour periods each week. 
Required of all freshmen. Staff 

Health and Physical Education 100a. Foundations of Physical Educa- 
tion (3-0-3). 

This course investigates the underlying factors that structure the physical 
education discipline. A study is made of the nature and scope of physical education, 
philosophy of physical education as part of general education, history of physical 
education, and the biological, psychological, and sociological interpretation of 
physical education. Mr. Bearden 

Health and Physical Education 110b. Foundations of Health Educa- 
tion (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the nature of growth and development of health education 
and anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of basic anatomy and 
physiology of the human body and its relationship and contributions to physical 
education, health education and education. Miss Richardson 



206 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Health and Physical Education 125a, 126b. Laboratory (0-3-2, each 

sem.). 

The folloAving physical educaiion athletic activities are included in this course: 
handball, soccer, tumbling, swimming and diving. Satisfactory completion of the 
swimming unit leads to certification as a Red Cross Water Safety Instructor. For 
each activity a study is made of the history, educational values, activity skills and 
game formations, methods of teaching and coaching, court and field construction, 
officiating, and audiovisual aids. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Dlaiid 

Physical Science 110a, b. The Fundamentals of the Physical Sciences. 
(3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of the basic principles of chemistry, physics, geology, astronomy, and 
meteorology with special emphasis upon the impact of science and technology on 
society. Mr. Hermance 

Health and Physical Education 200a. Principles and Philosophy of 
Physical Education in the United States (3-0-3). 

A study of physical education, recieational sports, and athletics in education and 
society. Emphasis is placed upon the biological basis of life, the unity of mind 
and body, the structure and function of the human organism in relation to social 
values, human behavior, and physical efficiency, and physical education in an age 
of automation and leisure. A study will be made of the American Association for 
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the Olympic Games, the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association, the Amateur Athletic Union, interscholastic and 
intercollegiate conferences, Little Leagues, and the camping movement. 

Mrs. Poindcxter 

Health and Physical Education 210b. Intramural Sports, School-Com- 
munity Recreation Programs, and Safety Education (3-0-3). 

A study is made of the educational values of intramural sports and recreation 
including leadership, organization and administration, units of competition, scoring 
plans and tournaments, facilities and equipment, publicity, and public relations. 
Safety education includes a survey of the safety movement in business, industry, 
and education, the program of safety education, professional liability, and safety 
standards. Mr. Barker 

Health and Physical Education 225a, 226b. Laboratory (0-3-2, each 

sem.). 

The following physical education activities are included: archery, tennis, squash, 
volleyball, badminton, fencing, and apparatus. For each activity a study is made 
of the history, educational values, court and field construction, activity skills and 
game formations, methods of teaching and coaching, officiating, and audiovisual 
aids. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Barker 

Health and Physical Education 300a. Kinesiology (3-0-3). 

This course is an introduction to kinesiology and a review of skeletal and 
muscular anatomy. It includes an anal)sis of selected physical education activities 
and investigates physical principles of equilibrium, motion, and force underlying 
bodily movement. Mr. Spence 

Health and Physical Education 310b. Methods, Materials, and Curricu- 
lum Construction in Physical Education and Interscholastic Athlet- 
ics, Grades 7-12 (3-0-3). 

This course of study includes a study of methods of teaching physical education, 
materials of the program, and curriculum construction in physical etlucation and 
interscholastic athletics. Special emphasis is placed upon teaching techniques and 
the learning process, class management, testing and grading, units of instruction, 
audiovisual and mateiial aids, and curriculum construction based upon sports and 
games, recreational and lead up activities, acjuatics, social and rhylliniic activities, 
self-testing activities, and the fundamental skills of movement. Air. Hermance 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 207 

Health and Physical Education 320a. Tests and Measurements and 
Adaptive Physical Education (3-0-3). 

This course includes anthropometric measurements, cardiac function tests, 
athletic achievement tests, classification tests, motor ability and capacity, motor 
fitness tests, and statistical methods. Adaptive physical education includes a study 
of society of the disabled and the retarded, adjustment problems of the handicapped, 
and the program of physical education for the handicapped. Mr. Bearden 

Health and Physical Education 321b. Physiology of Muscular Activity 

(3-0-3). 

This course investigates the specific effects of exercise upon the body systems 
with special emphasis on the circulatory, respiratory, and muscular systems. 

Mr. Spence 

Health and Physical Education 325a, 326b. Laboratory (0-3-2, each 
sem.). 

The following physical education, recreation, and athletic activities are included: 
golf, weight training, wrestling, basic rhythms, recreational and lead-up games, first 
aid and softbali. A study of first aid leads to the standard certification in first aid 
by the American Red Cross. For each activity a study is made of the history, 
educational values, court and field construction, activity skills and game formations, 
methods of teaching and coaching, officiating, and audiovisual aids. Laboratory 
fee required. Mr. Charlton 

Health and Physical Education 400a. Organization and Administration 
of Health and Physical Education (Including Interscholastic Athlet- 
ics), Grades 7-12 (3-0-3). 

This course is based upon a study of the organization and administration of 
programs of health, physical education, and interscholastic athletics, including 
administrative policies and procedures, staff, budget, facilities and equipment, 
office management, schedules, public relations, and publicity. Mr. Hermance 

Health and Physical Education 410b. Methods, Materials, and Curricu- 
lum Construction in Health Education, Grades 7-12 (3-0-3). 

This course is based upon a study of content and methods of teaching health 
education, materials of the program, and curriculum construction in school health 
education including student health service, school health environment, health 
instruction, resources for health education, appraisal of physical and mental health, 
the medical examination, school health council, audiovisual and material aids, and 
demonstrations. Miss Richardson 

Health and Physical Education 425a, 426b. Laboratory (0-3-2, each 
sem.). 

The following physical education and athletic activities are included: football, 
basketball, baseball, track and field, and the care and prevention of athletic 
injuries. For each activity a study is made of the history, educational values, court 
and field construction, activity skills and game formations, audiovisual aids, 
and the psychology and techniques of teaching and coaching interscholastic athletics. 
The care and prevention of athletic injuries includes a study of weight-control 
programs in athletics, drugs, massage, strains, sprains, contusions, dislocations, 
fractures, taping, impact force in athletics, basic conditioning, and training-room 
design, equipment, and operation. Mr. Bland 



208 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



History 



Professors Craig, Drew, Higginbotham, Hyman, Lear, Muir, 

Rath, and Vandiver, Chairman 

Associate Professors Galambos, Garside, Associate Chairman, 

Gruber, Loewenheim, Matusow, and Nell 

Assistant Professors Barker, Stokes, and Wiener 

HISTORY 

Undergraduate Majors. Undergraduates majoring in history are 
normally expected to take the equivalent of six year-courses in his- 
tory approved by the department, including two of the following: 
History 100a,b, History 110a,b, and History 200a, 201b. With the per- 
mission of the department, advanced work in the history of art or in 
political science may be substituted for not more than two advanced 
semester-courses in history. French or German is recommended as the 
foreign language for history majors; other languages may be accepted 
when special circumstances justify their substitution. 

Graduate Work in History. Graduate students in history are ac- 
cepted for study leading to either the M.A. or Ph.D. degree. Holders 
of the B.A. degree (or its equivalent) from an acceptable institution 
are eligible to apply. Since the graduate program is designed to train 
a limited number of carefully selected students, emphasis is on qual- 
ity rather than quantity. Both the M.A. and the Ph.D. degrees are 
offered in limited areas of American history and in several areas of 
medieval and modern European history, further information about 
which may be obtained on request from the department. 

Graduate fellowships as well as graduate scholarships are awarded 
on application to qualified students of demonstrated ability. Gradu- 
ate fellows are expected to render limited services to the department, 
although these services are not intended to be so heavy as to prevent 
the student's carrying a full study load. A number of graduate fel- 
lows are given the opportunity to gain experience in helping to edit 
either the Journal of Southern History or the Austrian History Year- 
book, both of which are sponsored by Rice University. The depart- 
ment also recommends a number of graduate students for NDEA fel- 
lowships. 

Requirements for the M.A. Candidates for the M.A. are expected 
to complete a certain amount of formal class or seminar work, 
usually the equivalent of eight semester-courses, in addition to pass- 
ing a reading examination in one foreign language (usually French 
or German) and writing a thesis under the direction of an advisory 
committee of the department headed by a professor having special 
competence in the subject area of the thesis. An oral defense of the 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 209 

thesis is also required. Completion of these requirements usually 
takes two years, although a special accelerated program is designed to 
award the M.A. after the completion of the work of one summer and 
one school year beyond the B.A. degree. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are 
expected to prepare themselves for a preliminary examination in two 
fields in their area of major concentration and in one minor field. 
Such preparation will normally include course work, seminars, di- 
rected reading, and a substantial amount of independent reading by 
the student. The comprehensive examination, which will include an 
oral and may include a written examination, is given only after the 
student has completed his course and seminar work and passed a 
reading examination in two foreign languages (usually French and 
German). In addition to the two foreign language examinations and 
the comprehensive examination, the Ph.D. candidate must present 
and defend a thesis embodying the results of original research. 

COURSES 

History 100a, b. Europe since 1500 (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An examination of the development of European civilization since the Renais- 
sance. Mrs. Dreiu, Mr. Garside, and others 

History 110a, b. American History (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A survey of the growth of the American nation, with considerable attention to 
its European background. Recommended as fulfilling the state requirement for 
prelegal and premedical students as well as for students seeking a teaching 
certificate. Messrs. Matusow, Vandiver and others 

History 200a. Ancient History (3-0-3). 

This course, together with History 201b, is intended to provide a historical 
backgroimd for the various humanistic branches of study. The work of the first 
semester is largely devoted to the history of the ancient Near East, Greece, and 
the Roman Republic. Mrs. Drew 

History 201b. Medieval History (3-0-3). 

This course is designed to be a continuation of History 200a. Its work is largely 
devoted to a study of the Roman Empire and the Middle Ages. Mrs. Drew 

History 304a, b. Independent Reading (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a member of the department. 
Open to Juniors in the Honors Program and occasionally to others with special 
permission. StaQ 

History 315a. America since the Civil War I (3-0-3). 

This is a discussion course dealing with the major intellectual, social, and 
political trends in the life of the American people since the Civil ^Va^. The first 
semester of the course begins with Reconstruction and ends with the Progressive 
Era. Open only to Juniors and Seniors with the consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Matusow 

History 316b. America since the Civil War II (3-0-3). 

A continuation of History 315a. This semester covers the period from World 
War I through the Johnson administration. Open only to Juniors and Seniors 
with the consent of the instructor. Mr, Matusow 



210 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

History 320a, b. Trends in European Culture during Antiquity and 
the Middle Ages (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course traces selected aspects of European thought from Periclean Athens 
to the later Middle Ages, with special reference to Hellenistic and Greco-Roman 
influences. Religious, philosophical, and scientific implications are examined in 
some detail. Prerequisite: History 200a and 201b or consent of instructor. Also 
offered as Classics 320a,b. Mr. Lear 

History 330a. The Renaissance, 1250-1527 (3-0-3). 

A survey of European history from the end of the Hohenstaufen Empire to the 
sack of Rome in 1527, with primary emphasis on Italy. Mr. Garside 

History 33 lb. The Two Reformations, 1517-1598 (3-0-3). 

A survey of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations of the sixteenth century. 

Mr. Garside 

History 340a. History of American Foreign Policy, 1775-1900 (3-0-3). 

American foreign policy and its relation to the foreign policies of other nations, 
with emphasis on the domestic political forces shaping governmental decisions. 
Among the topics considered are the diplomacy of the American Revolution, the 
perils of independence, the origins of the War of 1812, continental expansion, and 
the crisis of 1890's. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Not offered 1968-69. 

Mr. Neu 

History 341b. History of American Foreign Policy, 1900 to the Present 
(3-0-3). 

A continuation of History 340a. This portion of the course covers the rise of 
America to world power during the era of Theodore Roosevelt, World War I and 
American intervention. World War II, and the growth of rival Western and 
Communist blocs. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Not offered 1968-69. 

Mr. Neu 

History 345a. Medieval and Early Modern Russia (3-0-3). 

A survey of main developments in Russian history from the Kievan period to the 
reign of Catherine the Great. Admission with the consent of the instructor. 

Mr. Stokes 

History 346b. Russia in the Nineteenth Century (3-0-3). 

Russian history from accession of Alexander I to the Bolshevik Revolution. 
Admission with the consent of the instructor. Mr. Stokes 

History 35Ib. Europe, 1814-1870 (3-0-3). 

In the first part of the course the intellectual, religious, economic, social, 
diplomatic, and political trends of the period between 1814 and 1847 are examined. 
Then the revolutionary movement of 1848-49, the reign of Napoleon III, the 
unification of Italy, the unification of Germany, and the Franco-Prussian war 
will be studied. Mr, Rath 

History 355a, b. History of American Foreign Policy since 1890 (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Largely a discussion course focusing on major problems in American foreign 
policy. Among topics considered the first semester are the rise of America to world 
power. World War I and American intervention, and the diplomacy of the 1920's. 
The second semester covers American isolationism in the 1930's, World \Var II, 
the China tangle, and the growth of rival Western and Communist blocs. Open 
to students who have not taken History 340a and 341b only with the consent of 
the instructor. Mr. Neu 

History 360a. The History of England to 1714 (3-0-3). 

This course will survey English history from the Norman Conquest, emphasizing 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 211 

the growth of responsible government and the preconditions for an industrial 
society. Mr. IViener 

History 361b. The History of England since 1714 (3-0-3). 

Emphasis will be given to the rise and development of industrial society, the 
growth of democracy, and the adjustment of English ideas and institutions to 
these phenomena. Mr. Wiener 

History 365a. Nineteenth Century Britain (3-0-3). 

This course will examine the "two revolutions"— industrial and democratic— 
and their impact on British society. The emphasis will be on the changing character 
of British life, and more specifically, on the formation of the "Victorian Compro- 
mise." Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Wiener 

History 366b. Twentieth Century Britain (3-0-3). 

A continuation of History 365a. Some of the chief topics to be considered are 
the disintegration of "Victorianism," the problems of industrial "middle age," 
the growth of a welfare state, the decline in world power, and the nature of 
British society in the 1960's. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Wiener 

History 370a. Europe, 1648-1789 (3-0-3). 

A study of political, economic and intellectual developments in Europe, placing 
particular emphasis upon French history, leading thinkers of the Age of Reason, 
and the nature of Enlightened Despotism. Mr. Barker 

History 371b. The French Revolution and the Era of Napoleon (3-0-3). 

A study of the origins and course of the Revolution, the nature of the Napoleonic 
regime, and the spread of revolutionary ideas to other countries of Europe. 

Mr. Barker 

History 375a. Germany Since the Middle Ages (3-0-3). 

The first semester of this course is concerned with the history of Germany from 
the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. Special attention is devoted to reading 
of major historical works and to outstanding historiographical controversies, and 
the whole subject is treated in the broad perspective of comparative history. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

History 376b. Germany Since the Middle Ages (3-0-3). 

The second semester of this course is devoted to the history of Germany from 
the Bismarckian era to the present. Special attention is devoted to reading of 
major historical works and to outstanding historiographical controversies, and the 
whole subject is treated in the broad perspective of comparative history. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

History 380a, b. American Economic History (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of the economic history of the United States from the colonial period 
through the Second World War. Examination of principal economic trends will be 
supplemented by histories of individual firms and business leaders. Open to qualified 
students after consultation with the instructor. Not offered in 1968-69. 

Mr. Galambos 

History 390b. History of the American West (3-0-3). 

This course traces the westward movement from its beginning on the Atlantic 
seaboard to its culmination on the Pacific. Most attention is given to the history, 
institutions, and problems of the Trans-Mississippi West, with special emphasis on 
Texas and the Great Plains. Prerequisite: History 110a,b. Mr. Muir 

History 395a, b. A History of the South (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of life and economy of the Southern people from the colonial period. 
Primary emphasis is placed on the period to 1877. Prerequisite: History 110a,b. Not 
offered in 1968-69. Mr, Vandivtr 



212 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

History 404a, b. Senior Thesis (0-0-3, each sem.). 

A limited number of Seniors majoring in the department are allowed to write a 
thesis of fifteen to twenty-five thousand words on a subject to be approved in 
advance by their departmental advisers. Open to students in the accelerated M.A. 
program and to other well-qualified students with special permission. Students 
must take both History 404a and 404b in order to gain credit. Staff 

History 411a. Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Democracy (3-0-3). 

A study of the development of the United States from 1789 to 1848 with 
particular emphasis on political ideas and practices. Offered, with additional 
requirements, for graduate credit. Mr. Higginbotham 

History 430a, b. Topics in Ancient and Medieval Intellectual History 

(3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course deals with selective phases of classical and medieval thought based 
on the cultural monuments of antiquity and the Middle Ages. Intensive reading 
and reports on special aspects of the field. Prerequisite: History 200a and 201b. 
Also offered as Classics 430a,b. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Lear 

History 440a, b. Social and Economic History of Europe in the Middle 

Ages (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A seminar covering selected problems in the social and economic history of 
Europe from the period of the late Roman Empire to the close of the Middle Ages. 
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Mrs. Drew 

History 445b. Maritime and Naval History (3-0-3). 

The story of man's activity on the sea, with attention to commercial progress 
from early times and its effect on the development of nations; exploration and 
colonization; and the influence of sea power upon history. Mr. Craig 

History 450a. Contemporary History (3-0-3). 

A survey of current world affairs, with lectures and readings on the background 
of present-day policies and events. Mr. Craig 

History 453a. History of Southeastern Europe, Fourteenth to the Eigh- 
teenth Century (3-0-3). 

This course will deal with the Byzantine heritage, the Ottoman conquest and its 
impact upon the peoples of the Balkans, and the internal political and cultural 
history of the Rumanians, South Slavs, Greeks, and Albanians down to 1804. 
Admission with the consent of the instructor. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Stokes 

History 454b. History of Southeastern Europe Since 1804 (3-0-3). 

This course will deal with the rise of nationalism and the formation of national 
states in the Balkans, the decline of the Ottoman Empire, and the political and 
cultural history of Rumania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Admission with the consent of the instructor. 
Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Stokes 

History 455a. Modern Europe, 1871-1914 (3-0-3). 

The subject of this course is the political, diplomatic, and cultural history of 
Europe from the proclamation of the German Empire to the outbreak of the 
First World War. Prerequisite: History 100a,b. Mr. Loewenheim 

History 456b. Modern Europe, 1914 to the Present (3-0-3). 

The second semester of this course is concerned with the political, diplomatic, 
and cultural history of Europe from the First World War to the present. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

History 465a. Colonial America to 1754 (3-0-3). 

A study of the growth of society, thought, and politics in the English colonies of 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 213 

North America. Lectures, discussions, and papers; admission with the consent 
of the instructor. Mr. Gruber 

History 466b. The American Revolution, 1754-1789 (3-0-3). 

A study of the origins and implications of the American Revolution, emphasizing 
constitutional, social, and political developments. Lectures, discussions, and papers; 
admission with the consent of the instructor. Mr. Gruber 

History 475a. The History of Central Europe (3-0-3). 

A brief summary of the main phases of the history of Central Europe from 
ancient times to the present. Mr. Rath 

History 476b. Colloquium in Central European History (3-0-3). 

A critical examination of the main literature in the field. Prerequisite: History 
475a, Mr. Rath 

History 495a, b. Civil War and Reconstruction (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of the rise of sectionalism, the secession crisis. United States versus 
Confederate States, and economic and social consequences of the war. Emphasis 
is placed on the years 1861-1865. Prerequisite: History 110a,b. Mr. Vandiver 

History 500a, b. Historical Research (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Master's thesis. Students must take both History 500a and 500b in order to gain 
credit. StaQ 

History 509b. Reading and Research in the JefFersonian and Jackso- 
nian Periods (3-0-3). 

A weekly seminar for graduate students stressing written reports in reading and 
the preparation of a paper based upon research in primary materials. 

Mr. Higginbothmn 

History 510a. Directed Reading in American History (0-0-3). 

For graduate students only. Staff 

History 511b. Directed Reading in American History (0-0-3). 

Continuation of History 510a. Staff 

History 515a. General Reading in American History (0-0-3). 

An independent reading course designed to give students of graduate level 
a knowledge of the most significant works in the general field of Americon history 
as distinct from those in any specialized area. Staff 

History 516b. General Reading in American History (0-0-3). 
Continuation of History 515a. 

History 520a. Directed Reading in Medieval History (0-0-3). 

For graduate students only. Staff 

History 521b. Directed Reading in Medieval History (0-0-3). 

Continuation of History 520a. Staff 

History 530a. Directed Reading in Modern European History (0-0-3). 
For graduate students only. Staff 

History 531b. Directed Reading in Modern European History (0-0-3). 
Continuation of History 530a. Staff 

History 535b. Bibliographical Guides in United States History (3-0-3). 

A seminar for graduate students in the construction and use of bibliographies 
for research in United States history. Mr. Muir 



214 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

History 545a, b. Historiography (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Seminar in iiistoriography and the philosophy of history for graduate students. 

History 550a, b. Studies in the History of the Atlantic Community 
(3-0-3, each sem.). 

A seminar on the origins, character, and development of the Atlantic Com- 
munity, with special emphasis on its political, diplomatic, and cultural history since 
the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: History 455a and 456b or equivalent. Open 
to graduate students and to qualified Seniors with special permission. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

History 555a, b. Seminar in German History (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Frederick the Great, Bismarck, and Hitler. Studies in the history of the German 
political tradition. Prerequisite: History 455a and 456b or the equivalent. Qualified 
undergraduates may be admitted by special permission. Not offered 1968-69. 

Mr. Loewenheim 

History 565a, b. Seminar in Austrian History (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Selected topics in nineteenth and twentieth century Austrian history. Prerequisite: 
History 350a and 351b or 455a and 456b or the equivalent. Qualified undergraduates 
may be admitted by special permission. Mr. Rath 

History 570a, b. Seminar in the First World War (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Studies in the causes of World War I and the course of the Avar itself. Open to 
properly qualified graduate students after consultation with the instructor. 

Mr. Van diver 

History 575b. The Great Tradition in European Historical Writing 
from the Age of Gibbon to the Present (3-0-3). 

A seminar-research course examining the main currents of European historical 
writing since the eighteenth century. Special attention will be devoted to such 
seminal figures as Gibbon, Ranke, Macaulay, Treitschke, Burckhardt, Acton, Croce, 
Meinecke, Namier, and Lefebvre, and to a number of leading contemporary 
historians. For graduate students and qualified undergraduate students by per- 
mission. Graduate students are expected to have a reading knowledge of French 
or German. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Loewenheim 

History 580a. Seminar in the American Revolution (3-0-3). 

A research seminar in the American Revolution, open only to graduate students 
with the consent of the instructor. Mr. Grubei 

History 590b. Seminar in Western American History (3-0-3). 

This course includes a study of the leading authorities in Western American 
history, training in the critical examination of source material, and original 
research in selected topics of Western history. Open to graduate students and to 
Seniors who show a proficiency in history, after consultation with the instructor. 

Mr. Muir 

History 595a, b. Topics on Confederate History (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This seminar is devoted lo original research in various phases of the history of 
the Southern Confederacy, 1861-1865. Open to properly qualified students after 
consultation with the instructor. Mr. Vandiver 

History 600a, b. Historical Research (0-0-3, each sem.). 

Doctoral dissertation. StaQ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 215 



History of Art 

(See pages 189-190) 

Humanities 

Humanities 100a, b. Leading Minds in Western Civilization (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

A course in intellectual history. It is a study of the most important ideas in 
Western European and American civilization studied through the lives and works 
of understanding people from antiquity to the modern world. Mr. Tsanoff 

Humanities 101a, b. The Classical Foundations of Political Thought 
(3-0-3, each sem.). 

An examination of the historical and philosophical influences underlying the 
political theory and institutions of the classical world. The first semester is devoted 
primarily to the political and constitutional history of ancient Greece and Rome 
with the purpose of analyzing the governing systems and structures. The second 
semester deals with basic political ideas and problems of the ancient world such as 
natural law, justice, citizen and subject, republic, god-kingship, slavery, equality, 
and sovereignty. Mr. Lear 

Humanities 300a. The Beginnings of Modern Thought in the Renais- 
sance (3-0-3). 

A historical and critical outline of the transition from medieval to modern 
thought: an examination of the main representative minds of Renaissance culture 
in its many aspects: philosophical, scientific, literary, social-political. Mr. Tsanoff 

Humanities 300b. The Idea of Progress in History (3-0-3). 

A historical and systematic inquiry into the growing vitality of social values. In 
the first part of the course the idea of progress is traced in its historical development 
since classical antiquity. The second part of the term is devoted to an appraisal 
of the belief in social progress by an examination of the reasons for and against 
it provided by the evidence in the various social institutions. Mr. Tsanoff 

Humanities 3I0a, b. Autobiography: Its Personal and Social-Historical 

Aspects (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A study of the self-recorded lives of great men and women as intimate expressions 
of personal character and achievements and as individual reflections of various 
societies and ages from antiquity to modern times. Mr. Tsanoff 



Italian 

{See pages 137-140) 

Latin 

{See pages 137-139) 



216 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Linguistics 



Linguistics 401a. Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics (3-0-3). 

An introduction to language and linguistics giving consideration to basic 
linguistic concepts and techniques. Mr. Copeland 

Linguistics 402b. Special Topics in Linguistics (3-0-3). 

Topics will be drawn from the areas of historical linguistics, phonetics, 
phonemics, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Mr. Copeland 

Mathematics 

Professors Bochner, Bray, Connell, Curtis, Chairman, 

Rachford, and Ulrich 

Visiting Professor Koecher 

Associate Professors Jones, O'Neil, and Resnikoff 

Assistant Professors Bell, Freeman, Gersten, Harvey, Hempel, 

Jacobs, Polking, Rector, Wells, and Yap 

G. C. Evans Instructors Chern, Goldman, Lees, Leonard, 

AND Morgan 

Undergraduate Program 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major. It is permissible to 
major in mathematics in either the science-engineering program or 
the humanities (academic) program. In either case, twelve courses in 
mathematics are required. Three choices of courses are permissible. 
The first is Mathematics 100a,b, 200a,b or 210a,b, 300a, 340a, 370a,b, 
and two of the following combinations, Mathematics 400a and 410b, 
415a,b, 435a,b, 465a,b, and 470a,b. The second is Mathematics 220a,b, 
310a,b, 340a,b, 371a,b, 415a,b, or 525a,b, 445a,b, or 465a,b. The third 
is Mathematics 220a,b, 340a,b, 371a,b, 445a,b, 465a,b and two courses 
at the 500 level. Other programs may be permitted, but each pro- 
gram differing from those just listed requires written approval by the 
chairman of the Mathematics Department. An outstanding student in 
Mathematics lOOa.b, or 200a,b may, upon recommendation from his 
professor, be admitted into an honors section such as Mathematics 
310a,b. In the case of a double major (physics and mathematics, for 
example) ten courses in mathematics are acceptable to the depart- 
ment. 

Graduate Program 

Admission to graduate study in mathematics will be granted to a 
limited number of students who have indicated ability for advanced 
and original work. It normally takes one or two years after the bach- 
elor's degree to obtain an M.A. degree and three or four years to 
obtain a Ph.D. An M.A. is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. 

A number of graduate assistantships and fellowships are available 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION Zl/ 

and will be awarded on the basis of merit. The recipients of such aid 
are expected to devote about six hours a week to duties in the de- 
partment. 

The Qualifying Examinations 

The qualifying examinations in mathematics are conducted as fol- 
lows: 

1. Examinations are given during the first week of the second 
semester of each year. 

2. Students in their second year of graduate study are expected to 
take the General Examinations during that week. Also, well- 
qualified first-year graduate students may take these examina- 
tions. Students in their third year of graduate study are ex- 
pected to take a Special Examination during that week. 

3. There are three General Examinations covering the basic mate- 
rial in algebra, analysis and topology as specified in item 7 
below. The Special Examination is given in the student's choice 
of one of the fields of algebra, analysis or topology. 

4. The Special Examination is for the purpose of determining how 
much the student has learned of his chosen field of mathematics, 
and there is no specified outline of topics to be covered. 

5. The General Examinations will be considered as qualifying for 
the Master's degree. Passing the General Examinations is a pre- 
requisite for taking the Special Examination. Both General and 
Special Examinations together constitute the qualifying exami- 
nation for the Ph.D. 

6. The General Examinations will consist of three oral examina- 
tions, each by at least two faculty members, one in each of the 
three areas— analysis, topology, algebra. The examinations will 
be to determine if the student is familiar with the basic con- 
cepts and can work with them. Ability to simply recite the mate- 
rial listed in item 7 is no guarantee of success. 

7. There are detailed syllabi for the areas to be covered by the 
General Examination, but the following will serve as a rough 
guide: 

Algebra: Contents of Herstein plus Math 470a. 
Analysis: Differential Equations— Coddington 

Real Variable— Royden 

Complex Variable— Hille 

Either Math 415a or Math 525a 
Topology: Contents of Dugundji 

Math 445a or Math 465a 

Requirements for the Master's Degree. 

1. To qualify as a candidate for the Master of Arts degree, the 
prospective candidate must have: 
a. Done satisfactory work (2- or better) in at least eight courses 



218 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

acceptable to the department, exclusive of Mathematics 600. 
This is to mean that the grades in those courses completed 
during previous years, and the grades in those courses taken 
during the year in which the petition for candidacy is filed are 
satisfactory (2- or better). 

If a student's candidacy is approved under the above con- 
ditions, but his grades at the end of the year in which his 
candidacy is approved no longer meet these conditions, his 
candidacy for the master's degree is automatically revoked. 

b. Passed the General Examinations. 

c. Passed an examination in at least one approved foreign language 
(French, German, or Russian). 

2. The rernaining requirements for the master's degree are: 

a. The writing of an original thesis acceptable to the department 
while enrolled in Mathematics 600 (thesis). 

b. The passing of a final oral examination on the thesis. 

c. Any other conditions required by the general rules of the 
University. 

N.B. For students who transfer to Rice while engaged in a program 
of graduate study, transfer of course credits will be allowed 
only when approved by both the department and the Graduate 
Council. 

Requirements for the Doctor's Degree. 

1. To qualify as a candidate for the doctorate, the prospective candi- 
date must have: 

a. Completed satisfactorily (with a grade of 2- or better) at least 
twelve courses numbered 400 or higher, exclusive of Mathematics 
600 (thesis). The selection of these twelve courses must be 
satisfactory to the department. For students who transfer to the 
University in the middle of their graduate work, transfer of 
grades will be allowed only when approved by both the depart- 
ment and the Graduate Council. 

b. Passed both the General and Special Examinations as described 
above. 

c. Passed examinations in two approved foreign languages (French, 
German, or Russian). 

2. The remaining requirements for the doctorate are: 

a. Satisfactory work (2- or better) in at least fourteen semester- 
courses numbered 400 or higher, exclusive of Mathematics 600; 
these fourteen courses include twelve under the qualifying re- 
quirements. 

b. The writing of an original thesis acceptable to the department 
while enrolled in Mathematics 600 (thesis). 

^, The passing of a final oral examination on the thesis. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 219 

d. Any other conditions required by the general rules of the 
University. 

COURSES 

Mathematics 100a, b. Elementary Analysis (4-0-4, each sem.). 

Limits, diderentiation, and integration are introduced early in the year, and 
applications are discussed. Other topics include a careful definition of trigonometric 
and exponential functions, analytic geometry, partial differentiation, vector methods. 
The course is designed to give the student an introduction not only to the 
applications of the calculus but also to the techniques of mathematical reasoning; 
it (or Mathematics 220) is the basic course in mathematics and is required of all 
Freslimen enrolled in the science-engineering curriculum and may be elected by 
students in the humanities (academic) curriculum. 

Mathematics 101a, b. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Elementary logic, the real number system, introduction to differential and 
integral calculus. Emphasis is on the abstract nature of mathematical reasoning, and 
the purpose of the course is to indicate the place of mathematics among the 
several branches of knowledge. This course is open only to students in the 
humanities curriculum who do not plan to continue their study of mathematics 
beyond one year. 

Mathematics 200a, b. Advanced Analysis (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Least upper bounds, limits, definite integrals, improper integrals, infinite series, 
multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, divergence theorem and Stokes' 
theorem, with applications to physical problems. Required of all science-engineering 
majors who do not take Mathematics 210 or 220. Students with considerable facility 
in mathematical reasoning should enroll in Mathematics 210. Prerequisite: Credit 
for Mathematics 100 or permission of the department. 

Mathematics 210a, b. Advanced Analysis (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The course has the same scope as Mathematics 200 but is more complete and 
rigorous. Prerequisite: Written permission of the department. 

Mathematics 220a, b. Analysis (4-0-4, each sem.). 

An honors course for Freshmen covering the same material as Mathematics 100 
and 210. Registration by permission of the department. Selection is made on the 
basis of either the CEEli Advanced Placement Examination on analytic geometry 
and calculus or a qualifying examination given by the Mathematics Department at 
the beginning of the school year. The students are expected to know the techniques 
of differentiation, integration, areas, volumes, max-min problems, etc., in advance 
so that emphasis can be placed on the theoretical aspects. 

Mathematics 300a, b. Differential Equations (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Integration of differential equations of first order by elementary methods, 
geometry of integral curves, existence and uniqueness theorems for differential 
equations, properties of linear equations, oscillation and separation theorems, theory 
of regular singular points, special functions of mathematical physics. Fourier 
analysis, orthogonal systems, expansion theorems, boundary-value problems. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 200a,b, 210a,b, or 220a,b. 

Mathematics 310a, b. Functions of Several Variables (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An honors course following Mathematics 220. Linear algebra is developed as 
needed. Differentiation of functions from open subsets of Euclidean space to 
Euclidean space is studied; maxmin problems, Lagrange's multiplier rule, etc. are 
considered in this setting. Differential forms on Euclidean spaces and on manifolds 
are considered. Lebesgue integration for such forms is developed. Vector calculus 
is considered as a special case and applications to problems of dynamics are made. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 220a,b. 



220 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Mathematics 335a. Numerical Analysis (3-0-3). 

Computationally oriented studies of numerical techniques: polynomial and other 
approximations, interpolation, finite difference methods, numerical solution of 
ordinary and partial differential equations, solution of non-linear equations, 
iteration. Intended primarily for non-mathematics majors. 

Mathematics 336b. Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices. Analysis 
oriented toward related computable processes (e.g., solution of linear systems, 
matrix inversion, construction of eigensystems) and toward problem conditions, 
i.e., the sensitivity of solutions to changes introduced in the data or by rounding 
errors in computations. Intended primarily for non-mathematics majors. 

Mathematics 340a, b. Topology (3-0-3, each sem.). 

General topological spaces, compactness, paracompactness, metric spaces, com- 
pleteness, uniform continuity, simplicial complexes, CW complexes, mapping 
cylinders, the well-ordering principle, function spaces, the compact-open topology, 
covering spaces, fiber spaces, the fundamental group, and an introduction to 
homology and homotopy groups. Some mathematical maturity will be necessary. 
Prerequisite: One of Mathematics 200a,b, 2I0a,b, 220a,b, 310a,b, or consent of 
instructor. 

Mathematics 360a, b. Probability and Statistics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Conditional probability, Bernoulli's theorem, law of large numbers, distributions, 
central-limit theorem, correlation, large and small sample theory, goodness of fit, 
testing statistical hypotheses, design of experiments. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
200a,b, 210a,b, or 220a,b. 

Mathematics 370a, b. Algebra (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An introduction to the basic structures of algebraic systems: groups, rings, fields, 
and their morphisms. Vector spaces are studied extensively, including matrices, 
determinants, characteristic values, canonical forms, multilinear algebra. Basis 
theorem of abelian groups and modules is established. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
200a,b or 210a,b. 

Mathematics 371a, b. Algebra (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An honors course in algebra including the material of Mathematics 370a,b, finite 
group theory, and Galois theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 310a,b. 

Mathematics 400a. Complex Variable Theory (3-0-3). 

Linear transformations, holomorphic functions, power series, complex integration 
and the Cauchy integral, residue calculus. 

Mathematics 400b. Complex Variable Theory (3-0-3). 

An assortment of topics such as normal families, the Riemann mapping theorem, 
boundary correspondence, univalent functions, entire functions, and meromorphic 
functions. 

Mathematics 401b. Applied Complex Variable Theory (3-0-3). 

A selection of topics such as ordinary differential equations in the complex 
domain, special functions of mathematical physics, conformal mapping, the Laplace 
transform, and a more extensive treatment of the calculus of residues. 

Mathematics 410b. Real Variable Theory (3-0-3). 

Lebesgue and Daniell theory of measure and integration. 

Mathematics 415a, b. Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem, classification of partial differential equations, first- 
order hyperbolic systems, harmonic functions and potential theory, Dirichlet and 
Neumann problems, the Dirichlet principle, integral equations and the Fredholm 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 221 

alternative, hyperbolic equations, energy estimates, parabolic equations. Properties 
of solutions of elliptic and parabolic equations. 

Mathematics 435a, b. Numerical Analysis (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Approximate integration and differentiation by finite differences, interpolation, 
functional approximation, linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, eigenvalues, 
approximate solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 300a,b. 

Mathematics 445a, b. Algebraic Topology (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course develops homotopy theory, theory of fiber spaces, singular homology 
and cohomology. Theorems of Hurewicz and Whitehead are established. Spectral 
sequences are studied and used to analyze fiber spaces. Serre C- theory is developed. 
Geometrical applications are made in studying fixed-point theory, imbedding 
problems, and vector field problems. Prerequisites: Mathematics 340a,b and one 
of Mathematics 220a,b, 310a,b, 370a,b, or 371a,b. 

Mathematics 465a, b. Differential Geometry (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Differentiable manifolds. Stokes' theorem and deRham's theorem. Fundamental 
theorem of local Riemannian geometry, manifolds in Euclidean spaces. Lie groups, 
vector space bundles, theory of affine connections. 

Mathematics 470a, b. Algebra II (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Finite groups, Galois theory, and representation theory are developed. Special 
topics are included according to the instructor's interest. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
370a,b. 

Note: It will be observed that the numbers on the following courses 
come in groups of five. Each group represents one field in mathematics. 
If two courses in one group are given in the same year, then two of 
the five possible numbers will be used. If a student takes several 
courses in one group, they will be recorded with different numbers 
from the group. 

Mathematics 500-504. Advanced Complex Variable Theory (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

Special studies in complex variable theory; typical topics are normal family 
theory, conformal mapping of multiply-connected domains, univalent functions, 
Nevanlinna theory of distribution of values for entire and meromorphic functions, 
boundary behavior of holomorphic and meromorphic functions, Riemann surfaces, 
uniformization, Banach spaces of holomorphic functions, several complex variables, 

Mathematics 505-509. Topics in Analysis (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Typical topics include Dirichlet series, singularities of Taylor series, approxima- 
tion theory, constructive theory of functions, harmonic analysis, analytic number 
theory, infinitely differentiable functions, asymptotic representations, theory of 
composition, Tauberian theorems, moment problems, and closure theorems. 

Mathematics 510-514. Topics in Real Variable Theory (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

Typical topics are trigonometric series, Fourier integrals, the use of Banach 
spaces in classical and functional analysis, Orlicz spaces, and fractional integration. 

Mathematics 515-519. Topics in Partial Differential Equations (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Typical topics include singular integral operators, Hormander's theorv of linear 
differential operators, abstract Cauchy problems, elliptic equations of higher order, 
parabolic equations, not-well-posed problems, and a priori estimates for hyper- 
bolic equations. 



222 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Mathematics 520-524. Topics in Probability Theory (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Discrete and continuous parameter stochastic process, Markov processes, mart- 
ingales, stochastic potential theory. 

Mathematics 525a, b. Functional Analysis (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Topological linear spaces, theory of distributions, Banach algebras, harmonic 
analysis. 

Mathematics 526-529. Topics in Functional Analysis (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Generalized functions in sense of Gelfand and Shilov, semigroups, Banach spaces 
of analytic functions and invariant subspaces, singular integral operators, and 
interpolation of operators. 

Mathematics 530-534. Topics in Applied Mathematics (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

Typical topics include the Laplace transform and its application to problems in 
differential equations and complex variable theory, special functions of mathematical 
physics, methods of mathematical physics, calculus of variations, numerical analysis. 

Mathematics 535-539. Topics in Potential Theory (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Potential theory in n-dimensional Euclidean space, harmonic and superharmonic 
functions, Poisson integral, polar sets and capacity, Dirichlet problem. Green's 
function, Martin boundary. 

Mathematics 540-544. Topics in Point-Set Topology (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Typical topics include general point-theoretic topology, topology of 3-space, 
imbedding problems, topology of manifolds, decomposition spaces and mappings, 
knot theory, dimension theory, and theory of retracts. 

Mathematics 545-549. Topics in Algebraic Topology (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Material studied will include topics such as extraordinary homology and co- 
homology theories. Lie Groups, Bott periodicity, the Steenrod algebra, higher order 
cohomology operations, characteristic classes, sheaf theory, homotopy theory, vector 
fields on manifolds, imbedding problems. 

Mathematics 550-554. Topics in Combinatorial Topology (3-0-3, each 

sem.). 

Whitehead's theory of regular neighborhoods, simple homotopy type and torsion, 
generalized Poincar^ conjecture, combinatorial irabeddings of manifolds, triangu- 
lated manifolds and the Hauptvermutung, study of combinatorial manifolds of 
dimensions three and four. 

Mathematics 555-559. Topics in Differential Topology (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

Topology of differential manifolds, fiber bundles, tubular neighborhood theorem, 
^Vhitney imbedding theorem, transverse regularity theorem, diffeotopy extension 
theorem. Special topics: structure of manifolds and manifold pairs, s-cobordism 
theorem, Novikov's theorem, differential structures on spheres, cobordism theories, 
theory of immersions, characteristic classes, handle-bodies, smoothing theory, Cairns- 
Hirsch theorem, obstruction theory, Morse theory, infinite dimensional manifolds, 
and the calculus of variations, Atiyah-Singer theorem, Nash theory. 

Mathematics 600. Thesis. 

Mathematics Colloquium. 

The colloquium usually meets one afternoon each week to allow the exposition 
of original investigations by visitors, faculty members, or students. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 223 



Mathematical Sciences 

Professors de Figueiredo, Horn, Chairman, Jackson, Pfeiffer, 

Rachford, Salsburg, Thrall, Trammell, and Wang 

Associate Professors S. Davis, Ingram, Schmaedeke, and Young 

Assistant Professors Bowen, Dyson, Huband, Lutes, and Sibert 

Admission to the M.S. and Pli.D. programs is open to any engineer- 
ing, science, or mathematics major who has sufficient qualifications 
and is wilHng to supplement his background in either mathematics 
or one of the engineering and science areas. Candidates for an ad- 
vanced degree have to pass a qualifying examination in which com- 
petence in mathematics and in one area of the physical or behavioral 
sciences is tested. 

COURSES 

Mathematical Sciences 410. Linear Algebra (3-0-3). 

Discussion of elementary properties of finite dimensional real vector spaces. Also 
offered as Engineering 471. For a complete description see page 156. 

Mathematical Sciences 430. Complex Variables (3-0-3). 

Discussion of the elementary concepts of complex variable theory. Also offered 
as Engineering 472. For a complete description see page 156. 

Mathematical Sciences 450a. Numerical Analysis I (3-0-3). 

Numerical solution of linear and nonlinear equations. Numerical linear algebra. 
Interpolation, roots of polynomials, rounding errors, iterative processes. Also offered 
as Engineering 572. 

Mathematical Sciences 451b. Numerical Analysis II (3-0-3). 
Numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. 

Mathematical Sciences 471. Linear Programming (3-0-3). 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; Simplex method; revised 
simplex method; duality theory and applications; transportation problems; decom- 
position techniques. 

Mathematical Sciences 480a. Probability Theory (3-0-3). 

This course is also offered as Engineering 475. See page 156 for a complete 
description. 

Mathematical Sciences 481b. Mathematical Statistics and Random 
Processes (3-0-3). 
A continuation of Mathematical Sciences 480a. Also offered as Engineering 476. 

Mathematical Sciences 482a. Probability Theory and Random Pro- 
cesses (3-0-3). 

This course includes topics similar to those covered in Mathematical Sciences 
480. More emphasis will be given to subjects related to random sequences. 

Mathematical Sciences 511b. Group Theory for Chemists and Physi- 
cists (3-0-3). 

The basic definitions and theorems of group theory are first summarized with a 



224 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

minimum of theoretical development. The representation theory of groups, the 
construction of character tables, will be presented in some detail followed by a 
number of applications of group theory to quantum mechanics, chemical problems, 
and combinatorial problems. 

Mathematical Sciences 512b. Tensor Analysis (3-0-3). 

Multilinear algebra including exterior and symmetric algebra. Tensor fields on 
Euclidean manifolds. Prerequisite: Mathematical Sciences 410. 

Mathematical Sciences 522. Functional Analysis (3-0-3). 

Discussion of normed linear spaces, topological vector spaces, linear operators in 
locally convex topological vector spaces, theory of distributions, applications. 

Mathematical Sciences 541a, b. Integral Equations and Partial Differ- 
ential Equations (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Origin of integral equations, solutions by iterations, symmetric equations and 
completely continuous operators. Cauchy's problem and classification. Existence 
and uniqueness theorems for partial differential equations. Applications to prob- 
lems in science and engineering. 

Mathematical Sciences 545. Fundamentals of Nonlinear Systems 

(3-0-3). 

Intrinsic properties of nonlinear deterministic and random systems including 
stability, observability and controllability. An introduction to approximation theory 
and its application to nonlinear estimation. Also offered as Chemical Engineering 
517, Economics 527, and Electrical Engineering 517. 

Mathematical Sciences 563. Automata and Programming Theory 

(3-0-3) 

A general investigation of algorithmic processes. Also offered as Electrical Engi- 
neering 522. See page 172. 

Mathematical Sciences 565. Systems Programming (3-0-5). 

Design and implementation of programming systems for digital computers. Also 
offered as Electrical Engineering 622. For a complete description see page 173. 

Mathematical Sciences 567. Non-numerical Programming (3-0-3). 

Non-numeric applications of digital computers drawn from current literature 
will be discussed. Also offered as Electrical Engineering 624, described on page 173. 

Mathematical Sciences 571. Fundamentals of Optimization Theory 

(3-0-3) 

A discussion of the mathematical problems encountered when searching for the 
best element in a given set. Also offered as Chemical Engineering 518, Economics 
528, and Electrical Engineering 518. See page 171. 

Mathematical Sciences 573. Advanced Mathematical Programming 

(3-0-3) 

Theory, computational methods, and applications of various advanced program- 
ming models. Also offered as Chemical Engineering 519, Economics 529, and Elec- 
trical Engineering 519. See page 171. 

Mathematical Sciences 576a, b. Topics in the Mathematical Theory 

of Optimal Control (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Liapunov's theorem on the range of vector measures, Pontryagin's maximal 
principle, bang-bang principles, existence theory, controllability, synthesis of op- 
timal controls, relaxed control problems, direct methods (construction of minimiz- 
ing sc(iuenccs), multiplier rules in locally convex spaces and application to the 
optimal control of distributed parameter systems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 410, 
Mathematical Sciences 443. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 225 

Mathematical Sciences 592a, b. Seminar in Applied Mathematics 
(3-0-3, each sem.). 

Mathematical Sciences 596a, b. Special Topics in Mathematical 
Sciences (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Mechanical Engineering 

(See pages 175-184) 

Military Science 

Professor Wendt, Chairman 
Assistant Professors Rodriguez and Finch 

Military Science 101a. Organization of the Army; Individual Weapons 
and Marksmanship (1-1-1). 

Organization of the squad, platoon, and company of the infantry battalion 
emphasizing specific duties and responsibilities of key personnel. The integration of 
small units into larger teams and general design of military organization to fit 
missions to be performed. Functioning, care, and maintenance of the caliber .30 
rifle with stress on marksmanship training and good shooting habits. 

Military Science 102b. U. S. Army and National Security (1-1-1). 

A brief presentation of national defense policy and world-wide commitments 
that require support of the armed foices. The mission and capabilities of the U, S. 
Army Reserve and National Guard; the missions, capabilities, and interdependence 
of the U. S. Air Force, U. S. Navy, and U. S. Army. The role of the U. S. Army 
in conceivable types of warfare. 

Military Science 201a. American Military History (2-1-2). 

Survey of American military history from the origin of the U. S. Army to the 
present with emphasis on the factors which led to the organizational, tactical, 
logistical, operational, strategical, and social patterns found in the present-day army. 

Military Science 202b. Map and Aerial-Photograph Reading; Introduc- 
tion to Basic Tactics (2-1-2). 

Application of basic principles of map and aerial-photograph reading to military 
science. Organization, composition, and mission of basic military teams to include 
rifle squad, patrols, and small infantry-tank teams. Combat orders and formations, 
cover and concealment, patrolling, field fortifications, and camouflage. 

Military Science 301a. Military Teaching Principles and Branches of 
the Army (2-1-2). 

Educational psychology as it pertains to the five stages of instructional technique 
and the importance of each, including practical application to military instruction. 
The role of each of the combat arms and services of the Army. Conduct of guerrilla 
warfare and counterinsurgency operations. 

Military Science 302b. Military Leadership: Small-Unit Tactics and 
Communications (3-1-3). 

Responsibilities and basic qualities of a leader, objectives of leadership, leader- 
ship principles and techniques, functional role of the leader, and special problems 
of military leadership. Principles of offensive and defensive combat and their 
application to the units of the infantry division. Familiarization with the means and 
principles of Army communications. 



226 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Military Science 401a. Military Operations: Logistics and Administra- 
tion. (3-1-3). 

Organization and functions of a military staff, using the infantry division staff 
as a model, relationship between commanders and the staff and the relationship 
between subordinate units and the staff; the army logistics system, including supply, 
maintenance, evacuation, and troop movement; the role of the officer in Army 
administration, to include familiarization with Department of Army publications 
and forms. 

Military Science 402b. Military Law; Role of the U. S. in World Af- 
fairs; and Service Orientation (2-1-2). 

Brief history of military law, the articles of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, 
nonjudicial punishment, composition and jurisdiction of courts-martial, rules of 
evidence, and trial procedures; analysis of the major geographical areas of the 
world with regard to economic power, war potential, and inclination and aptitude 
for the conduct of war; customs of the service; conduct and code of an officer; 
responsibilities and obligations of an officer; the Army as a career. 

Music 

The Shepherd School of Music 

Associate Professor Hall 

Lecturer Bedford 

Opportunity for students to continue their music activity at Rice 
will be found in the Rice Chamber Orchestra and University and 
College choruses. They may also arrange for private study of their 
instrument through the Music office. 

Music 300a, b. Orientation and Historical Survey (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An investigation into the technical, psychological, and social aspects of music. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Mr. Hall 

Music 315a, b. Harmony and Sight-Singing (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Instruction in the theory and practice of traditional harmony, sight-singing and 
dictation. The translations of notation into rhythm and sound, and sound into 
notation. Includes all triads and seventh chords, with inversions and nonchord 
tones. Mr, Hall 

Music 4 1 5a, b. Advanced Harmony (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Advanced work in harmony including chromatic alteration and modulation, 
modern technics, and original work in small forms. Prerequisite: Music 315 or 
instructor's permission. Afr. Hall 

Naval Science 

Professor Potter, Chairman 

Associate Professor Ogier 

Assistant Professors Cameron, Latham, Taylor, 

AND TuRBEVILLE 

Naval Science courses as described luill be taken in successiori as listed 
Naval Science 100a, b. Sea Power and Orientation (1-1-1, each sem.). 

This course consists of a one-hour weekly classroom period plus a one-hour 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 227 

weekly laboratory in which fundamental concepts of sea power, traditions, customs, 
organization, seamanship, and missions of the Navy are presented. In addition, 
either History I00a,b (Europe since 1500) or History llOa.b (American History)— 
both taught by the History Department— is a course requirement for all Freshman 
N.R.O.T.C. students. 

Naval Science 201a. Navigation (3-1-3). 

Terrestrial and celestial navigation. Piloting problems, utilizing electronic and 
visual navigation aids, are studied. Motions of celestal bodies are determined. The 
celestial sphere concept is utilized in determining position by the employment of 
spherical trigonometry. 

Naval Science 202b. Naval Weapons (3-1-3). 

Introduction to naval weapons and space technology. Fire-control systems. 
Principles of sonar and radar. Guided missiles. Nuclear weapons and radiological 
defense. Antisubmarine warfare. Amphibious warfare. 

Naval Science 301a. Naval Machinery (3-1-3). 

Basic principles of and problems in thermodynamics are employed in the study 
of various power cycles of both main propulsion and auxiliary plants. Steam, 
internal combustion, and nuclear plants are studied and their energy transformations 
analyzed. With the emphasis on fundamental principles employed, the student is 
familiarized with the entire shipboard engineering plant, including electrical 
systems, refrigeration, compressed-air, and hydraulic systems. Principles of ship 
stability are studied, including evaluations of transverse and longitudinal stability 
after damage and weight change. 

Naval Science 302b. Naval Operations (3-1-3). 

The elements of shipboard operations, including the Rules of the Nautical Road, 
problems in relative motion, maneuvering ships in formation, and employment of 
the Striking Force. Fleet communications, with an introduction to electronics 
countermeasures. The effects of weather on naval operations. 

Naval Science 401a. Naval Leadership (3-1-3). 

This course consists of one of several appropriate psychology courses offered by 
the Psychology Department, together with the regularly scheduled Naval Science 
laboratory and drill period. Psychology may be taken any year. 

Naval Science 402b. Principles and Problems of Leadership (3-1-3). 

Application of the principles of naval management, naval administration, and 
leadership. 

N.R.O.T.C. students who desire to be commissioned as second 
lieutenants in the U. S. Marine Corps or Marine Corps Reserve^ and 
zvhose applications for transfer are accepted, will substitute the follow- 
ing courses during the final two years. 

Naval Science 303Ma. Evolution of the Art of War (3-1-3). 

Significance of military power. Classic principles of war, analyzed as a foundation 
for further understanding of military operations by a study of famous battles. 

Naval Science 304Mb. Modern Basic Strategy and Tactics (3-1-3). 

Basic strategic concepts and principles of offensive and defensive tactics through 
the battalion level. 

Naval Science 403Ma. Amphibious Warfare (3-1-3). 

History of amphibious warfare. Development of amphibious tactics. Gunfire 
support. Planning. Logistics. Administration. 



228 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Naval Science 404Ma. Marine Corps Leadership and the Uniform 

Code of Military Justice (3-1-3). 

Development of leadership techniques through a study of the basic psychology 
of leadership. Uniform Code of Military Justice. 



Philosophy 



Professors Fulton, Kolenda, Chairman, and Nielsen 

Visiting Professor Manser 

Assistant Professors Austin, Burch, and Giannoni 

Instructor Holien 

Undergraduate Majors: Philosophy majors will normally be re- 
quired to take at least eight semesters of upper-division courses. 
While introductory courses are not required as prerequisite for ma- 
joring in philosophy, they are regarded as suitable preparation. All 
majors will be required to take at least two semesters in the history 
of philosophy. Regarding other philosophy courses students must con- 
sult with members of the department about their program. With de- 
partmental approval, qualified upper-classmen may enroll for inde- 
pendent study in Philosophy 401a, 402b, or both. 

Requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy include: 

(a) The completion with high standing of courses approved by the 
department. 

(b) Ability to use French and German in accordance with the 
requirements on page 101 

(c) The passing of qualifying examinations in history of philosophy, 
metaphysics, value theory, and logic and epistemology. 

(d) The completion of a written thesis on a subject approved by the 
department. At least one year of thesis research must be spent 
in residence. 

(e) Satisfactory performance of limited teaching duties assigned by 
the department. 

(f) The passing of a final oral examination, not limited to the 
student's special field of study. 

COURSES 

Philosophy 221a. Philosophical Classics (3-0-3). 

Introduction to major figures in the Western philosophical tradition, centered 
around the mind-body problem. Readings in Plato, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, 
Hume, Kant and Ryle. Afr. Kolenda 

Philosophy 222b. The Imagination of the West (3-0-3). 

Study of tlie forms of thought and feeling that have shaped the Western 
imagination, conducted by means of an examination of philosophical texts, poetry, 
music, film, and contemporary popular culture. Materials studies will vary from 
year to year, but a typical semester might include such things as a Platonic dialogue, 
St. Augustine's Confessions, the Goliad poets, Coleridge's Biographia Literaria, 
Rock'n'RoU music, and the Hippie Ethic. Mr. Mackey 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 229 

Philosophy 271a. Introduction to Religious Thought, I (3-0-3). 

Introduction to major questions in the philosophy of religion: the existence of 
God, the problem of evil, the nature of religious experience and its relation to 
doctrines, the relation of theology to science and to ethics. Mr. Austin 

Philosophy 272b. Introduction to Religious Thought, II (3-0-3). 

Study of various types of contemporary religious orientation, Protestant, Roman 
Catholic and Jewish. Special attention to existential questions of freedom, history 
and destiny. Readings in Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Buber, Maritain, Bonhoeffer and 
Bultman. Mr. Nielsen 

Philosophy 301a. Thales to Plotinus (3-0-3). 

Extensive reading and discussion of major texts of ancient philosophy in trans- 
lation. Not given in 1968. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 302. Medieval Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Historical and critical study of some major medieval thinkers, with emphasis 
on their metaphysical and epistemological views. Philosophers studied include 
St. Augustine, St. Anselni, Peter Abelard, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Bonaventura, 
St. Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William Ockham. Offered in the fall semester 
of 1968-69. Mr. Machey 

Philosophy 303a. Galileo to Hume (3-0-3). 

Historical and critical study of major works of seventeenth- and eighteentli- 
century rationalism and empiricism. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 304b. Kant and the Nineteenth Century (3-0-3). 

Study of major philosophical movements of European and American thought 
from the late eighteenth to early twentieth centuries. Mr. Kolenda 

Philosophy 311a. History of Religion: The Far Eastern Tradition 
(3-0-3). 

Reading in the holy books of India, China, and Japan. Study of Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Critical biography of the founders 
and leading teachers of the major traditions. Examination of contemporary ex- 
pressions of Eastern religions as "living faiths." Mr. Nielsen 

Philosophy 312b. History of Religion: The Western Tradition (3-0-3). 

Study of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in their historical development. Atten- 
tion to the basic themes of Western theism: God, immortality, history, evil, and 
redemption. Use of Biblical criticism in the study of the Old and New Testaments 
as well as the Koran. Prerequisite: Philosophy 31 la or permission of instructor. 

Mr. Nielsen 

Philosophy 32 1 a. Logic (3-0-3). 

A study of first-order logic with emphasis on proof-theoretic techniques; also 
an introduction to non-truth functional logics, higher-order logics, and the 
philosophy of logic. Mr. Giannoni 

Philosophy 322b. Advanced Logic (3-0-3). 

Consistency, completeness, and decidability of first-order and higher-order logics; 
Turing machines; recursive techniques and computability. Mr. Giannoni 

Philosophy 323a. Philosophy of Science (3-0-3). 

In what sense do scientific theories aim to "explain" nature? How are they 
related to philosophical and "common sense" ideas? How are they constructed 
and tested? Particular attention to the relations of causality, chance, and prob- 
ability in physical theory, and to physical explanations of organic and mental 
phenomena. Mr. Austin 



230 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Philosophy 326b. Philosophy of Social Sciences (3-0-3). 

The central issue is the specific character of social scientific explanation. Topics 
to be considered include: "action" vs. "behavior" explanations; operationalism, 
behavioralism, and experimentation vs. theory construction; the role of models; 
the role of statistics. Mr. Giannoni 

Philosophy 331a. Ethics (3-0-3). 

Study of some representative traditional and contemporary theories, and an 
examination of their bearing on practical issues. Mr. Manser 

Philosophy 334b. Moral and Political Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Examination of one or more of the following issues and topics: the concept of 
morality, the basis of political authority, justice, morality and law, the nature and 
extent of liberty, political and social theories. Some attention will be given to 
issues such as the legal punishment of immorality, the First Amendment, the 
death penalty. Sioff 

Philosophy 361a. Aesthetics (3-0-3). 

Readings in ancient, medieval, and modern aesthetics, focused on problems in 
the metaphysics of art and beauty. Special attention will be given to the arts of 
language (rhetoric and poetry) by reading and discussion of selected writings in 
literary theory. Mr. Mackey 

Philosophy 362b. Philosophy in Literature (3-0-3). 

Study of philosophical themes in selected works in the English, French, German, 
and Russian literatures from Shakespeare to Beckett. Mr. Kolenda 

Philosophy 401a. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Department permission required. Sta§ 

Philosophy 402b. Independent Study (3-0-3). 

Department permission required. StaQ 

Philosophy 404b. Contemporary Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Bradley to Whitehead. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 441a. Epistemology (3-0-3). 

Examination of one or more of the following topics: the concepts of knowledge, 
belief, certainty, evidence, perception; theories of knowledge such as realism, 
phenomenalism, rationalism. Mainly twentieth century philosophers will be con- 
sidered. Staff 

Philosophy 462b. Existential Psychoanalysis (3-0-3). 

The notion of existential psychoanalysis, especially as worked out in Sartre's 
Saint Genet. Mr. Manser 

Philosophy 476b. Natural Science and Religion (3-0-3). 

A brief history of the interaction of religious ideas and scientific theories since 
Copernicus and Luther, followed by a close examination of theories (in biology, 
cosmology, and metaphysics) which have been thought particularly relevant to 
religious and ethical questions. Mr. Austin 

Philosophy 501a. Research and Thesis (3-0-3). 

Staff 

Philosophy 502b. Research and Thesis (3-0-3). 

Staff 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 231 

Philosophy 511a. Wittgenstein and His Influence (3-0-3). 

Study of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations and of its influence on 
contemporary philosophy. Mr. Kolenda 

Philosophy 513a. Peirce and Pragmatism (3-0-3). 

Study of the thought of C. S. Peirce and of its influence on other pragmatists, 
especially William James and John Dewey. Mr. Kolenda 

Philosophy 521a. Readings in Non-Christian Religious Philosophy 
(3-0-3). 

Critical examination of the major traditions of Indian and Chinese philosophy. 
Attention to both historical development and modern expressions of Hindu and 
Buddhist thought. Appraisal of contemporary interpretations as related to both 
idealism and existentialism. Mr, Nielsen 

Philosophy 522b. Protestant Philosophy since the Reformation (3-0-3). 

Critical appraisal of the relation of the Reformation to the philosophical 

tradition: Protestant scholasticism, nineteenth-century idealism and modern neo- 

orthodoxy. Readings in Luther, Calvin, Kant, Schleiermacher, Kierkegaard, 

Nietzsche, and Karl Barth. Mr. Nielsen 

Philosophy 524a. Hellenism and Christianity (3-0-3). 

Study of the Hebrew and Greek traditions as the principal determinants of 
Western theism. Treatment of Christian philosophy in relation to Biblical criticism, 
hermeneutics and the problem of demythologizing. Not offered in 1968-69. 

Mr. Nielsen 

Philosophy 525b. The Problem of Religious Knowledge (3-0-3). 

Consideration of the major types of religious epistemology in their contemporary 
expression. Readings in Dilthey, Heidegger, Jaspers, Ricoeur, Gadamer, and Ian 
Ramsey. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Nielsen 

Philosophy 542b. Symbolism (3-0-3). 

The theory of symbols and their use in philosophy, literature, religion, etc. 
Readings in Cassirer, Whitehead, medieval theorists, and others. Mr. Mackey 

Philosophy 543a. Hegel (3-0-3). 

Study of Phenomenology of Mind and Encyclopaedic Logic, with papers on 
special projects. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 544b. Metaphysics (3-0-3). 

Systematic study of selected metaphysical problems, conducted by means of 
examination of classical and modem texts. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Mackey 

Philosophy 545a. Kant (3-0-3). 

Close study of the Critique of Pure Reason. Papers and projects of special 
problems in Kantian philosophy. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 552b. Husserl (3-0-3). 

Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 554b. Whitehead (3-0-3). 

Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Fulton 

Philosophy 556b. Philosophical Psychology (3-0-3). 

Investigation of one or more of the following concepts: sensation, memory. 



232 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

imagination, dieaming, thinking, action, willing, intention, pleasure, emotion, 
desiring, etc. Attention will be given to such traditional problems as: mind and 
body, action and will, free will and necessity, etc. Staff 

Philosophy 567a. Philosophy of Mathematics (3-0-3). 

Study of logicism, intuitionism, and formalism. Special attention will be given 
to the following topics: the existence of mathematical entities, relation of mathe- 
matics to logic and empirical science, the nature of mathematical and logical 
leasoning. Mr. Giannom 

Philosophy 573a. The Nature of Dialectic (3-0-3). 

Study of Sartre's Critique de la raison dialectique, including a general discussion 
of the nature of dialectic in Hegel and Marx. Mr. Manser 

Philosophy 575a. Analytic Philosophy (3-0-3). 

Investigation of one or more than one topic in recent philosophy dealing with 
the following: the problem of other minds, knowledge and belief, the nature of 
analysis, description and reference, the analytic-empirical distinction, reasons and 
causes of action. Staf) 

Philosophy 576b. Explanation of Behavior (3-0-3). 

Study and critical discussion of Charles Taylor's book bearing this title and of 
other related issues and theories. Mr. Manser 

Philosophy 582b. Current Issues in the Philosophy of Science (3-0-3). 

Recent literature on a small number of interrelated topics pertaining to the 
"logic" of scientific theories, will be considered in some detail. Prerequisite: previous 
work in philosophy of science, or permission of instructor. (Not given in 1968-G9.) 

Mr. Austin 

Philosophy 583a. Philosophy of Physics (3-0-3). 

Study of the philosophical problems in physical geometry, Relativity Theory, 
and Quantum Theory. Topics to be discussed include: Riemann's philosophy of 
space; Non-Euclidean geometries; the concept of simultaneity; the role of in- 
determinism in Quantum Theory. (Not given in 1968-69.) Mr. Giannoni 

Philosophy 584b. Science and Philosophy in the "Scientific Revolu- 
tion" (3-0-3). 

Major exponents and critics of the "corpuscular philosophy will be studied, with 
emphasis on the interaction among conceptions of scientific method, fundamental 
world-pictures, and mathematically formulated theories. Prerequisite: previous 
work in philosophy of science, or permission of instructor, Mr. Austin 



Physical Education 

{See pages 205-207) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 233 



Physics 



Professors Class, Donoho, Estle, Houston, Phillips, Risser, 

Rorschach, Chairman, Trammell, and Walters 

Visiting Professor Wildermuth 

Associate Professors Clayton and Duck 

Assistant Professors Baker, Jordan, and Lane 

Lecturers Bryan and MacKellar 

Undergraduate Program. The general requirements for the Bache- 
lor of Arts with a major in physics are outlined on pages 56-57. Stu- 
dents expecting to major in physics should enroll in Physics 210a,b 
and 230a in the Sophomore year. Four physics lecture courses and 
two laboratory courses must be selected in the Junior and Senior year 
and will usually include: 

Junior year: Physics 310a, b and Physics 400a,b 

Laboratory (Physics 330b) 
Senior year: Physics 415a,b and Physics 425a,b 

Laboratory (Physics 430a,b) 

Students with advanced standing or extraordinary ability may be 
permitted to register in one or more graduate courses in the Senior 
year. In addition, students with extraordinary ability and research in- 
terest may be permitted to begin experimental or theoretical research 
with faculty supervision during the summer between their Junior 
and Senior years. They may continue this work during their Senior 
year in lieu of the regular Senior laboratory sequence. Two mathe- 
matics courses should be selected in consultation with a member of 
the physics faculty. Each student will be assigned a faculty adviser at 
the end of his Sophomore year, who will be responsible for course 
registration for the Junior and Senior year. The adviser will also be 
responsible for engaging the student's participation in some aspect of 
his research program. 

Chemical Physics Major. An interdepartmental major in chemical 
physics is offered in conjunction with the Department of Chemistry. 
Students wishing to elect this major must be approved by both de- 
partments. 

Graduate Program. The Department of Physics offers studies and 
research programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. The Physics Department offers research facilities 
and thesis supervision in the fields of Atomic Physics and Quantum 
Electronics, Nuclear Physics, Solid State and Low Temperature Phys- 
ics and Theoretical Physics. 

To be eligible for the Master of Arts degree, a graduate student 
must complete 30 semester hours of approved graduate-level studies, 
including a research thesis performed under the direction of a physics 



234 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

faculty member. He must demonstrate proficiency in one foreign lan- 
guage. A minimum of one year of graduate study is required for the 
M.A. To be eligible for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a graduate 
student must first satisfy the department of his ability to actively en- 
gage in advanced research. This is normally done by successfully com- 
pleting the work for the Master of Arts in physics, or by equivalent 
research publication. The student must also complete 60 hours in res- 
idence of approved graduate-level studies, including a research thesis 
completed under the direction of a physics faculty member. He must 
demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language. A minimum of two 
years of graduate study is required for the Ph.D. Further details of 
research programs in physics and departmental degree requirements 
are contained in a pamphlet "Graduate Study in Physics and Space 
Science" available from the physics department on request. 

COURSES 

Physics 100a. Mechanics (3-0-3). 

The first semester of the sequence in physics for those who will continue physics 
in the sophomore year. Topics of study include: kinematics; dynamics of particles 
and solids based on Newton's three laws of motion. The level of treatment is 
approximately that of the text "Mechanics and Heat" by Hugh D. Young. Students 
taking Physics 100a must have completed or be enrolled in Mathematics 100a or b 
or Mathematics 220a or b. Messrs. Bryan and Rorschach 

Physics 100b. Introductory Relativity and Beginning Electricity and 
Magnetism (3-0-3). 

The second semester of the sequence in physics for those students who will 
continue physics in the sophomore year. Topics included are introductory relativity 
and the initial part of electricity and magnetism which is continued in the 
sophomore year. The level of treatment is approximately that of the text "Electricity 
and Magnetism" by E. M. Purcell. Prerequisite: Physics 100a. Students enrolled in 
Physics 100b must enroll in Physics 130b. Messrs. Bryan and Rorschach 

Physics 101a, b. Introductory Survey of Physics (3-3-4, each sem.). 

An introductory course consisting of two lecture hours, one tutorial hour, and 
three hours of laboratory work per week. This course provides a broad study of 
classical and modern physics and evolution of contemporary attitudes in these 
fields. It is designed as a terminal course to be open only to academic students and 
students of architecture. Students taking Physics 101 must have completed or be 
enrolled in Mathematics 100a,b or Mathematics 101a,b. This course is especially 
recommended for academic students in their Junior or Senior year. It may also 
be taken by academic and architecture students at the Freshman and Sophomore 
level. Laboratory fee required. Messrs. O'Brien and Soga 

Physics 130b. Elementary Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Required of all students who wish to receive credit toward graduation for 
Physics 100b. Elementary error analysis and curve fitting. Experiments on the 
classical motion of macroscopic bodies and electrons. Studies of the transient and 
steady state behavior of simple networks containing resistance, capacitance, and 
inductance. Mr. Baker and Staff 

Physics 210a. Electricity and Magnetism (3-0-3). 

The third semester of the four-semester sequence in physics for science and 
engineering students. The study of electricity and magnetism begun in Physics 
100b is continued, with topics including electric currents, the fields of moving 
charges, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, and electric and magnetic 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 235 

properties of matter. Students enrolled in Physics 210a must have completed Physics 
100a,b and Mathematics 100a, b or 220a,b. They must be enrolled in a mathematics 
course of level 200 or higher. Students enrolled in Physics 210a must enroll in 
Physics 230a. Messrs. Anderson and Walters 

Physics 210b. Wave Motion and Electromagnetic Waves (3-0-3). 

The final semester of the four semester sequence in physics for science and 
engineering students. Topics include wave motion and oscillations, coupled oscil- 
lators, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic field energy and momentum, 
guided electromagnetic waves, and physical optics. Prerequisite: Physics 210a. 

Messrs. Anderson and Walters 

Physics 230a. Elementary Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Required of all students who wish to receive credit toward graduation for 
Physics 210a. Transistor characteristics, transistor amplifier, negative and positive 
feedback. Klystron oscillator, microwave propagation, polarization, and diffraction. 
Elementary geometrical optics. Spectrum of atomic hydrogen. Photoelectric effect. 

Mr. Baker and Staff 

Physics 310a, b. Introduction to Physics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This is the first year of a two-year sequence on modern physics. The historical 
need for quantum theory is reviewed. Wave mechanics is presented and applied 
to the one dimensional harmonic oscillator, to the free particle, and to the one- 
electron atom. Extensions of the theory to multi-electron atoms and to molecules 
are presented. The principal text for the course is on the level of "Fundamentals of 
Modern Physics" by R. M. Eisberg. Prerequisites: Physics 210a,b, completion of or 
simultaneous enrollment in Mathematics 300a,b or equivalent. 

Physics 330a. Junior Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Fall Semester: Introduction to electronics. Basic properties of electron devices 
and their applications in physics research. Laboratory fee required. Staff 

Physics 330b. Junior Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Required of all Juniors majoring in physics. Spring Semester: Introductory 
experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. Physics 310a,b must be taken con- 
currently. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Jordan 

Physics 400a, b. Introduction to Mathematical Physics (4-0-4, each 
sem.). 

A systematic review of the principal subjects in mechanics and electrodynamics. 
Mathematical methods, including differential equations and vector analysis, will be 
applied to the solution of problems in particle dynamics, vibrating systems, dynamics 
of rigid bodies, electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic field. 

Mr. Duck and Staff 

Physics 415a, b. Principles of Modern Physics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course continues the development of the principles of modern physics begun 
in Physics 310. Topics in atomic, molecular, solid state and nuclear physics are 
covered. The course includes a treatment of the special theory of relativity, which 
gives the covariant formulation of the laws of mechanics and electrodynamics. 

Mr. Wolf 

Physics 425a, b. Statistical and Thermal Physics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An introduction to the behavior of macroscopic systems and to the microscopic 
basis for that behavior. Topics include: The approach to equilibrium; statistical 
derivation of the laws of thermodynamics; classical thermodynamics of simple sys- 
tems; methods and results of quantum and classical statistical mechanics; systems of 
interacting particles; magnetism; transport processes; kinetic theory; irreversible 
processes; and fluctuations. The principal text in the course is on the level of 
"Statistical and Thermal Physics" by F. Reif. Mr. Kohler 



236 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

Physics 430a. Senior Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Required of all Seniors majoring in physics. Experiments in geometrical, physical, 
polarization, and quantum optics; spectroscopy, resonance fluorescence in atoms and 
nuclei; and microwave spectroscopy. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Phillips 

Physics 430b. Senior Physics Laboratory (0-3-1). 

Required of all Seniors majoring in physics. Experiments in physics of current 
research interest: low-energy nuclear spectroscopy; electron-positron annihilation; 
X-ray crystallography; electron paramagnetic resonance; the Meissner effect and 
other low-temperature phenomena; and optical pumping. Readings in the research 
literature are required. Laboratory fee required. Mr. Phillips 

Physics 510a. Analytical Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, normal vibrations, rigid body motion, 
and the transformation theory of dynamics. Mr. Risser 

Physics 510b. Electromagnetic Theory (3-0-3). 

Time-varying electromagnetic fields and boundary-value problems, radiation, and 
relativistic electrodynamics. Mr. Risset 

Physics 520a, b. Principles of Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3, each sera.). 

A deductive presentation of the principles of quantum mechanics with applica- 
tions to various problems in spectroscopy, collisions of particles, emission and ab- 
sorption of radiation, quantum statistical mechanics, motion of electrons in crystals, 
etc. As a prerequisite a student should have knowledge of elementary wave me- 
chanics. Mr. Houston 

Physics 540a, b. Nuclear Physics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Nuclear properties; interaction of radiation with matter and radiation detection; 
nuclear reactions and models of nuclear structure; nuclear forces; the fundamental 
particles and their interactions. Mr. Class 

Physics 550a, b. Stellar Evolution and Nuclear Astrophysics (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

The physical principles governing the structure and evolution of stars and the 
synthesis of the elements in stellar interiors. The major topics are (1) state of 
matter at high temperature and density, (2) mechanisms of energy transport, (3) 
thermonuclear reaction rates, (4) calculation of stellar structure and evolution, and 
(5) the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements. The experimental evidence from 
astronomy, nuclear physics, and natural abundances is correlated throughout. The 
emphasis of the course varies somewhat from year to year, but it may be ascertained 
in advance from the instructor. Previous or concurrent enrollment in Physics 520 
is the only prerequisite. Mr. Clayton 

Physics 560a, b. Structure of Solids (3-0-3, each sem.). 

A review of the quantum mechanical theory of perfect crystals. Nuclear and 
electron motions will be studied as an explanation of thermal, electrical, and mag- 
netic phenomena in solids. The theory of finite groups will be outlined and applied 
to crystal phenomena. Not offered every year. Mr, Houston 

Physics 563. Introduction to the Solid-State (3-0-3). 

This course will provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts about 
crystalline solids, and provide the basic preparation for further courses in the 
sequence Physics 564-567. It will consist of the following: a brief review of Quantum 
Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics, a discussion of crystal structure, a study of 
the difl'raction of waves by lattices, and an introduction to the concept of the 
reciprocal lattice, classical and quantum-mechanical descriptions of lattice vibra- 
tions and the thermal properties of insulators, and the properties of electrons in 
solids including free-electron and band-theoretical approaches. Prerequisites: An 
introductory background in wave mechanics and statistical mechanics, and con- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 237 

current enrollment in a graduate level quantum mechanics course is assumed. Also 
ofTered as Chemistry 563, Electrical Engineering 563, and Mechanical Engineering 
563. Sta^ 

Physics 564. Electron Transport and Superconductivity (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Physics 563. It will consider various aspects of electron transport, pri- 
marily from a microscopic viewpoint. Among topics to be covered will be various 
contributions to electron scattering and some techniques for measuring the Fermi 
Surface. In addition, an introduction to superconductivity will be presented. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 563 or equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry 564, Electrical En- 
gineering 564, and Mechanical Engineering 564. Mr. Rudee 

Physics 565. Dielectric & Optical Properties of Matter (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Physics 563. Topics included are: polarization and the static model of 
a dielectric medium in an electric field; extension of the above model to the 
dynamic case and dielectric dispersion in solids; stimulated effects with applications 
to lasers; the dynamics of nonlinear interaction between radiation and matter. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 563, or equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry 565, Electrical En- 
gineering 565, and Mechanical Engineering 565. Mr. Rabson 

Physics 566. Imperfections and Mechanical Properties 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Physics 563. Point defects in crystals, geometrical description of disloca- 
tions and the mathematical theory of lattice imperfections will be discussed. Non- 
thermal generation of point defects, physical observation of defects in crystals and 
special properties of lattice imperfections in metallic, ionic and homopolar crystals 
will be covered. How lattice imperfections in ionic, metallic and homopolar crystals 
affect certain physical properties of these crystals will be developed. The effects of 
lattice defects, particularly dislocations, upon the mechanical properties of crystals 
will be discussed. Prerequisites: Physics 563 or equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry 

566, Electrical Engineering 566, and Mechanical Engineering 566. 

Messrs. Roberts and Estle 

Physics 567. Magnetism and Magnetic Resonance (3-0-3). 

This course is one of the introductory graduate level courses on the solid state 
that follow Physics 563. The basis of the magnetic properties of solids will be dis- 
cussed. This will include diaraagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, anti- 
ferromagnetism, and ferrimagnetism. The phenomenon of magnetic resonance will 
be studied. This will include nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic 
resonance, and ferromagnetic resonance. The emphasis will be on the atomic origin 
of magnetism, and on a description of the elementary excitations of ordered mag- 
netic materials. Prerequisite: Physics 563, or equivalent. Also offered as Chemistry 

567, Electrical Engineering 567, and Mechanical Engineering 567. Mr. Estle 

Physics 570a, b. Atomic Physics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Theory of atomic and molecular structure. Theory of atomic collisions and ap- 
plication to the study of basic atomic and molecular processes. Mr. Lane 

Physics 590. Research Work. 

Stag 

Physics 600a, b. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics 

Not offered every year. StaQ 

Physics 610a, b. Advanced Experimental Nuclear Physics 

Topics of interest to the experimental nuclear physicist. Not offered every year. 

Stag 

Physics 620a, b. Theoretical Nuclear Physics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

General nuclear properties, two-body problems, scattering, nuclear spectroscopy, 



238 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

nuclear reactions, interaction of nuclei with electromagnetic and electron-nuetrino 
fields, nuclear shell theory. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Kohler 

Physics 630a, b. Advanced Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Many Body Theory: Hartree-Fock and Thomas-Fermi approximations, atomic 
and nuclear multiplets, Racah Algebra, second quantization, Feynman diagrams, 
Green's functions, quasi particles and collective motions, applications. Collision and 
Radiation Theory: Formal scattering theory, Lippman-Schwinger equation, an- 
alytic properties of the S-matrix, causality, optical theorem, dispersion relations. 
Applications: potential scattering, resonance reactions, direct reactions, coherent 
scattering from complex systems, optical model, quantum theory of radiation, Dirac 
equation, Feynman propagators and rules for computation of S-matrix, theory of 
renormalization, Dyson equation applications. Mr. Trammell 

Physics 640. Special Topics in Nuclear Physics. 

Current developments. In 1966-67, a survey of nuclear models. Not offered every 
year. Sta^ 

Physics 660b. Gravitation and Relativity (3-0-3). 

A study of the theories of gravitation with emphasis on the General Theory of 
Relativity. Applications, experimental tests, and cosmological implications are dis- 
cussed. A familiarity with the Special Theory of Relativity such as is covered in 
Physics 415 or equivalent is desirable. Also given as Space Science 560b. Mr. Michel 

Physics 700. Summer Graduate Research. 

Open only to students already admitted as candidates for an advanced degree. 
At least forty hours of laboratory work per week. Sta§ 



Political Science 

Professors Tullock and von der Mehden 

Associate Professors Ambler, Cooper, Chaivjnan, and Dix 

Assistant Professors Cuthbertson and Gerhardt 

Lecturer Hudspeth 

Instructor Hinckley 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Majors in Political Science. Students majoring in political science 
are required to take the equivalent of five two-semester courses in the 
field. These must include Political Science 2I0a,b in addition to 
courses selected from at least three of the following areas: 

1. American Politics. 

2. Comparative Government. 

3. Constitutional Law. 

4. International Relations. 

5. Political Theory. 

Six hours of advanced work, selected upon the advice of the depart- 
ment, should also be completed in any of the following fields: 
anthropology, economics, history, humanities, philosophy, sociology, 
or psychology. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 239 

COURSES 

Political Science 210a, b. Introduction to Political Science and Ameri- 
can Government (3-0-3, each sem.). 

This course studies the nature of political science, the origin of the state, and 
major ideologies. An examination of British parliamentary democracy provides a 
background to American institutions. The course then examines the history and 
operation of the federal government and American politics. Planned for any stu- 
dent interested in political science, the course is also designed to meet state pro- 
fessional requirements for prospective lawyers, physicians, and teachers. 

Mr. Cooper, Cuthbertson and others 

Political Science 305a. Directed Reading I (0-0-3). 

Independent reading under the supervision of a member of the department. 
Open only to Junior majors with the consent of the department. Staj) 

Political Science 306b. Directed Reading II (0-0-3). 

Continuation of Political Science 305a. Independent reading under the super- 
vision of a member of the department. Open only to Junior and Senior majors 
with the consent of the department. StaQ 

Political Science 310a, b. Law and Society (3-0-3, each sem.). 

The study of law as a social science. Approximately one-third of the course deals 
with such concepts as the meaning of justice, the development of the English com- 
mon law, equity, and statutory law, and their adoption in the United States; the 
meaning of jurisdiction and our state and federal court system. The remaining two- 
thirds of the course deals with the substantive law of contracts, agency, bailments, 
sales, partnerships, and corporations. The casebook method is employed for the 
latter part of the course. Mr. Hudspeth 

Political Science 315a. American Government and Politics (3-0-3). 

A study of American national policy-making, emphasizing the roles of Congress 
and the Presidency in the processes of legislation and administration and the inter- 
action of these institutions with interest groups, political parties, the bureaucracy 
and the courts. Mr. Gerhardt 

Political Science 316b. American Governmental Policies (3-0-3). 

Application of a general analysis of American national policy-making to selected 
fields of governmental activity, including foreign aid, defense policy, and fiscal 
policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 315a. Mr. Gerhardt 

Political Science 320a. American Constitutional Law (3-0-3). 

This course deals with the interpretation of the Constitution by the Supreme 
Court. The treatment is largely historical and deals primarily with problems of 
federalism, the commerce clause, protection of property, taxation, the separation 
of powers, and civil rights. The casebook method is used, supplemented by assigned 
readings. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Hudspeth and Mr. Cuthbertson 

Political Science 325a. Development of American Political Institutions 
(3-0-3). 

This course will attempt to place three major subsystems in the American political 
system in historical perspective. Attention will be devoted to the development of the 
national party system, the Congress, and the Presidency in their contemjDorary 
forms, to their relations and interdependencies in various periods, and to the causes 
and determinants of change. In addition, some attention will be devoted to systems 
analysis as a theoretical construct for approaching the problem of institutional 
change and development. Mr. Cooper 

Political Science 330b. American Parties, Politics, and Pressure Groups 
(3-0-3). 

The nature and functions of contemporary American political parties and pres 



240 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

sure groups. The course will include a study of American elections and public 
opinion, party composition and organization, and the relation of parties and pres- 
sure groups to legislation and administration. Miss Hinckley 

Political Science 340a. Ancient and Medieval Political Theory (3-0-3). 

This course introduces the sources of ancient and medieval political thought. 
Special emphasis will be given to the historical analysis of political philosophy and 
mythology and to the influence of Plato and Aristotle. Mr. Cuthbertson 

Political Science 341b. Modern Political Theory (3-0-3). 

This course examines the problems and concepts of contemporary political theory: 
democracy and totalitarianism; state and individual; power and scientific politics; 
liberalism and conservatism; "the lunatic fringe"; and the "decline" of modern po- 
litical thought. It compares the theoretical origins of modern governments and 
studies the theory of nationalism. Mr. Cuthbertson 

Political Science 360a. Comparative Government: Western European 

Democracies (3-0-3). 

A survey of government and politics in Western European democracies, with 
primary emphasis on Great Britain, France, and Germany. Mr. Ambler 

Political Science 361b. Comparative Goverment: Totalitarian Systems 

and the Politics of Modernization (3-0-3). 

The first half of the semester will be devoted to a study of totalitarian political 
systems, notably Nazi Germany, the U.S.S.R., and Communist China. The last half 
of the course will deal with selected political systems in underdeveloped areas, 
focusing upon problems of political modernization. Mr. Ambler 

Political Science 370a. International Relations (3-0-3). 

An analysis of basic factors in world politics and examination of various systems 
of international relations— from the balance of power to nuclear multipolarity. The 
course will also deal with the changing nature of world politics by analysing new 
factors and forces in international relations and the new meaning of war and 
peace in a greatly enlarged international community of the mid-twentieth century. 
^ G ; t> Mr.Tullock 

Political Science 380a. Introduction to Political Behavior (3-0-3). 

An examination of the behavioral approach to the study of politics. Topics to be 
discussed will include voting behavior, community power, legislative behavior, po- 
litical culture and the significance for democratic government of findings in these 
areas. Miss Hinckley 

Political Science 405a, b. Senior Thesis (0-0-6). 

Open only to Senior majors upon invitation by the department. Students must 
complete both Political Science 405a and 405b in order to obtain credit. Staff 

Political Science 415a. Seminar in American National Security Policy 

(3-0-3). 

Reading and research on selected topics related to the goals, decision processes, 
conduct, and impact of American national security policies. Prerequisite: consent of 
the instructor. Mr. Gerhardt 

Political Science 440a. Collective Decision-Making (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the use of abstract logical models in political analysis. The 
existing models, closely resembling those used in economics, will be explored in 
detail and tlicir application to the real world examined. Although the course will 
mainly deal with the simpler political models, the newer and more complicated 
applications of this method will also be discussed. Mr. Tullock 

Political Science 455b. Government and Politics in Great Britain 
(3-0-3). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 241 

This seminar will deal with British political institutions, political parties, political 
culture, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: Political Science 3G0a or consent of 
the instructor. Not offered in 1968-69. Mr. Ambler 

Political Science 460b. Comparative Politics (3-0-3). 

With a primary focus on informal political processes, this course deals with 
selected topics such as political culture, social structure and politics, oligarchy and 
democracy, political parties, electoral systems, pressure groups, civil-military rela- 
tions, and political change. These and other topics will be examined in a compara- 
tive context with material to be drawn primarily from Western democracies and 
from underdeveloped areas. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Ambler 

Political Science 465a. Government and Politics in France (3-0-3). 

This seminar will deal with French political institutions, political parties, po- 
litical culture, and other selected topics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

Mr. Ambler 

Political Science 485b. Seminar in Political Behavior (3-0-3). 

Advanced readings and research on special topics in political behavior. Prerequi- 
site: Political Science S80a. Miss Hinckley 

Political Science 490a, b. Research Seminar in Modern Political 

Theory and Interdisciplinary Fields (3-0-3, each sem.). 

Open only to qualified Seniors after consultation with the instructor. 

Mr. Cuthbertson 



Portuguese 

(See pages 137-140) 

Psychology 

(See pages 124-126) 

Russian 

(See pages 137-141) 

Sociology 

(See pages 120-124) 



242 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Space Science 



Professors Dessler, Chairman ^ Gordon, Low, O'Brien, 

Stebbings, and Walters 

Associate Professors Clayton, Freeman, Haymes, Heymann, 

and Michel 

Assistant Professors Anderson, Cloutier, Goldwire, 

SoGA, Tucker, and Wolf 

Research opportunities exist for graduate studies leading to degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of 
Space Science. To gain such a degree a student must be knowledge- 
able in many areas of space science and expert in at least one. 

There is no bachelor's degree with a major in Space Science. How- 
ever, elective courses are offered to acquaint Rice undergraduates 
and graduates from other institutions with many of the concepts and 
research opportunities in space science. 

Space science is an interdisciplinary field; undergraduates with 
bachelors' degrees in astronomy, chemistry, electrical engineering, geo- 
physics, physics, or any of several other scientific and engineering dis- 
ciplines may apply for admission to graduate work in the depart- 
ment. The Department of Space Science research programs include 
astrophysics, fields and particles, meteoritics, planetary structure and 
planetary atmospheres. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The requirements for M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are outlined below. 
A booklet giving more detailed and specific information is available 
from the department office. 

Degree of Master of Science. A candidate for a master's degree 
shall have completed successfully at least 30 semester hours of ap- 
proved graduate-level studies. He must also demonstrate his under- 
standing of Space Science in an oral examination by his faculty com- 
mittee. He shall prepare a written thesis on an original research topic 
and defend his thesis orally. 

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The basic requirement for a stu- 
dent to receive the Ph.D. is that he demonstrate the capacity for in- 
dependent, original research. In addition, there are the following for- 
mal requirements: 

A student is normally admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. by satis- 
fying the requirements for the M.S. degree in space science. 

A minimum of three years' graduate study is normally required. 
Candidates who hold a master's degree may complete requirements 
for the doctorate in two years. The student must complete at least 60 
hours in residence of approved graduate-level studies, in addition to 
demonstrating proficiency in one foreign language. A candidate shall 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 243 

prepare a thesis on an original research topic and defend the thesis 
orally. The thesis must be of such quality that it would be acceptable 
for publication in a reputable scientific journal. 

COURSES 

Space Science 300b. General Astronomy (3-0-3). 

An introduction to the changing realm of astronomy. This course will be essen- 
tially descriptive in nature. It will cover such topics as astronomical instruments, 
the solar system, stars, galaxies, quasars, etc. Cosmological theories concerning the 
origin and evolution of the universe will also be discussed. No prerequisites; open 
to Sophomores with permission. Messrs. Kovar and Rosenberg 

Space Science 400a, b. Introduction to Space Science (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An introduction to phenomena of current interest in space science, including: 
astronomy, astrophysics, solar-terrestrial relationships, properties of the interplane- 
tary medium, cosmic radiation, the Van Allen and other radiation belts, auroras, and 
planetary atmospheres and ionospheres. Emphasis will be on qualitative descriptions 
rather than rigorous analyses. Prerequisite: Physics 100 and 200 or equivalent. 

Messrs. Cloutier and Haymes 

Space Science 500a, b. Particles and Fields (3-0-3, each sem.). 

An introduction to the interactions on a cosmic scale between charged particles 
and magnetic and electric fields. Topics include principles of plasma physics, 
particle orbit theory, the solar wind, the effect of the solar wind on magnetic fields 
of the earth and sun, geomagnetic storms, cosmic radiation, and Van Allen radia- 
tion. The first semester will be devoted to a rigorous treatment of the behavior of 
the plasma state. Research applications of basic principles will be covered in the 
second semester. Messrs. Dessler and Tucker 

Space Science 510a. Analytical Dynamics (3-0-3). 

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, normal vibrations, rigid body motion, 
and the transformation theory of dynamics. Also offered as Physics 510a. 

Space Science 510b. Electromagnetic Theory (3-0-3). 

Time-varying electromagnetic fields and boundary-value problems, radiation, and 
relativistic electrodynamics. Also offered as Physics 510b. 

Space Science 512b. Planetary Atmospheres (3-0-3). 

A study of observed phenomena and processes in planetary atmospheres, both 
neutral and ionized. Properties of the earth's atmosphere will be studied in detail, 
and this information applied to an analysis of observations of atmospheres of other 
planets, with emphasis on Venus, Mars, and Jupiter. Space Science 400a,b or equiva- 
lent is prerequisite. Messrs. Brown and Gordon 

Space Science 520a, b. Principles of Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

A deductive presentation of the principles of quantum mechanics with applica- 
tions to various problems in spectroscopy, collisions of particles, emission and ab- 
sorption of radiation, quantum statistical mechanics, motion of electrons in crystals, 
etc. As a prerequisite a student should have a working knowledge of elementary 
wave mechanics. Also offered as Physics 520a,b. 

Space Science 550a, b. Stellar Evolution and Nucleosynthesis (3-0-3, 
each sem.). 

Analysis of the physical principles governing the structure and evolution of stars 
and the synthesis of elements in stellar interiors. Basic topics covered are (1) intro- 
duction to stars, (2) equation of state of ionized matter, (3) energy transport, (4) 
thermonuclear reaction rates, (5) calculation of stellar structure and evolution. 



244 WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 

and (6) correlation of observed abundances with mechanisms of nucleosynthesis. 
The course is mathematical, but the physical motivations for all discussions will he 
emphasized. Previous or concurrent enrollment in Physics 520a,b is prereciuisite. 
Also offered as Physics 550a,b. Mr. Clayton 

Space Science 580. Graduate Research. Credit to be arranged. 

Staf] 

Space Science 590a, b. Space Science Colloquium (1-0-1, each sem.) 

staf] 

Space Science 600a, b. Special Topics in Space Science (3-0-3, each 
sem.). 

Current topics including modern developments in Space Science such as infra- 
red astronomy, x-ray astronomy, lunar geology, auroral physics, etc. The emphasis 
may vary from year to year. Staff 

Space Science 650a. Advanced Topics in Stellar Evolution (3-0-3). 

The topics vary at the discretion of the instructor but may include: (1) com- 
puter programs in stellar evolution, (2) supernovae, (3) astrophysical sites of 
heavy-element synthesis, (4) nuclear chronology of the galaxy, (5) stellar pulsa- 
tion, (6) stellar rotation, and (7) semiempirical approach to stellar evolution. 
Grades will normally be assigned on the basis of a written research paper. Space 
Science 550a,b is prerequisite. Mr. Clayton 

Space Science 660b. Gravitation and Relativity (3-0-3). 

A study of the theories of gravitation with emphasis on the General Theory of 
Relativity. Applications, experimental tests, and cosmological implications are 
discussed. A familiarity with the Special Theory of Relativity such as is covered in 
Physics 415 or equivalent is desirable. Also offered as Physics 660b. Mr. Michel 

Space Science 700. Summer Graduate Research. 

Open only to students already admitted as candidates for an advanced degree. 
At least forty hours of laboratory work per week. Staff 



Spanish 

{See pages 138-143) 

Theater 

{See pages 189-190) 



Index 



Academic Calendar, v 
Academic curricula, 54 
Academic honors and awards, 

88 
Academic regulations, 66 
Academic Suspension, 68 
Accounting, Fifth Year in, 56 
Accounts, delinquent, 78 
Administration, Officers of, 3 
Admission, 71 

Early Decision Plan, 73 

Freshmen, 71 

Graduate, 102 

Regular Decision Plan, 73 

Transfer, 75 
Advanced Degree Requirements, 

99 
Advanced Placement, 75 
Anthropology, 120 

Courses, 120 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Undergraduate Major, 120 
Apprenticeship Plan for Student 

Teachers, 154 
Approval of candidacy, gradu- 
ate, 101 
Approval of Majors, Undergrad- 
uate, 67 
Architecture, 114 

Courses, 116 

Curriculum, 59 

Graduate study, 116 

Undergraduate requirements, 
114 
Architecture, William Ward 

Watkin Chair in, 48 
Army Reserve Officers' Training 

Corps, 63 
Art, courses, 189 
Art History, courses, 189 



Assistantship-Fellowship, Gradu- 
ate, 105 
Associates, Rice University, 5 
Athletic Department Staff, 36 
Athletics, 96 

Automobiles, regulations on, 96 
Awards, Prizes and, 89 

Bartlett Aesthetics Program, 49 
Behavioral Science courses, 118 
Biblical Studies, Isla and Percy 
Turner Professorship in, 48 
Bio-Chemistry 

Curriculum, 53, 56 

Major in, 127 
Biology, 127 

Courses, 128 

Curriculum, 53-59 

Graduate study, 127 

Undergraduate requirements, 
127 
Board and room, 79 
Board of Governors, 4 
Bond, guaranty, 78 
Brown and Root Chair of Engi- 
neering, 47 
Business Administration, 144 

Courses, 150 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Calder, Louis, Professorship in 

Chemical Engineering, 47 
Calendar, Academic, v 
Campus and Facilities, 45 
Chairs, 47 

American History, 47 

Architecture, 48 

Biblical Studies, 48 

Chemical Engineering, 47 

Chemistry, 49 



245 



246 



WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Economics, 47 

Engineering, 47 

English, 48 

Ethics, 48 

Geology, 49 

History, 47, 48 

Management, 47 

Mathematics, 47 

Philosophy and Religious 
Thought, 48 

Political Science, 48 

Sociology, 48 
Chapel, Memorial, 95 
Change of Curriculum, 67 
Charges, special, 77 
Chemical Engineering, 157 

Courses, 158 

Curricula, 57-59 

Graduate study, 158 

Undergraduate program, 157 
Chemical Engineering, Louis 

Calder Professorship in, 47 
Chemical Physics 

Curriculum, 53, 56 

Major in, 133 
Chemistry, 133 

Courses, 134 

Curriculum, 53-59 

Graduate study, 133 

Undergraduate program, 133 
Chemistry, Robert A. Welch 

Chair in, 49 
Civil Engineering, 161 

Courses, 163 

Curriculum, 57 

Graduate study, 162 
Classics, courses, 137, 139 
College Board Tests, 71 
College Masters, 9 
Colleges, Residential, 45, 76, 79, 

92 
Commerce, 143 

Courses, 143 



Curriculum, 60 

Committees, University stand- 
ing, 38 

Contents, iii 

Course credit, 113 

Course deficiencies, removal of, 
69 

Course numbers, 113 

Courses of Instruction, 113-242 

Courses of study, 54 

Course programs, undergradu- 
ate, 54, 66 

Curricula changes, 67 

Curricula and Degrees, 53 

Deficiencies, removal of course, 

69 
Degrees, 53, 99 

Graduate, 99-103 

Research, 100, 103 

Undergraduate, 53 

With honors, 70, 88 
Delinquent accounts, 78 
Delta Phi Alpha, 88 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees, 99 
Dormitories, see Residential 
Colleges, 45, 76, 79, 92 

Early Decision Admission, 73 
Economics, 144 

Courses, 146 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Graduate study, 144 

Undergraduate program, 144 
Economics, Heni^ S. Fox, Sr. 

Chair of Instruction in, 48 
Economics, Reginald Henry 

Hargrove Chair in, 47 
Education, 151 

Courses, 153 

Teacher's certificate, 151 
Electrical Engineering, 168 

Courses, 169 



INDEX 



24: 



Curriculum, 57 

Graduate study, 168 

Undergraduate program, 168 
Emeritus Faculty, 10 
Employment, 87 
Engineering, 155 

See also, chemical, civil, elec- 
trical, and mechanical en- 
gineering 
Engineering, Brown and Root 

Chair of, 47 
Engineering, Professional De- 
grees in, 100, 102 
English, 184 

Courses, 185 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Graduate study, 184 

Undergraduate program, 184 
English, Libbie Shearn Moody 

Professorship in, 48 
Enrollment, Number, 43 
Entrance examinations, 71 
Entrance requirements, 71 

Undergraduate, 71 

Graduate, 102 
Environmental Science and En- 
gineering, 174 

Courses, 175 
Ethics, David Rice Chair in, 48 
Examinations, graduate, 101 
Examinations, undergraduate 

courses, 67 
Expenses, Undergraduate, 77 

Fees, 77 

Living, 79 

Special charges, 77 

Tuition, 77 
Expenses, Graduate, 104 

Fees, 104 

Tuition, 104 

Faculty, 10 

Faculty, Emeritus, 10 



Fees, undergraduate, 77 
Fees, graduate, 104 
Fees, refund of, 78 
Fellowship, Graduate, 105 
Financial Assistance for New Stu- 
dents, 74 
Fine Arts, courses, 189 
Foreign Languages 

See, Classics, French, German, 
Greek, Italian, Latin, Por- 
tuguese, Russian, Spanish 
Fox, Henry S., Sr. Chair of In- 
struction in Economics, 48 
Fox, Lena Gohlman, Chair of 
Instruction in Sociology, 48 
French, 191 
Courses, 192 
Curriculum, 53, 54 
Graduate study, 191 
Undergraduate program, 191 

General Information, 99 
Geology, 195 

Courses, 197 

Curriculum, 53-59 

Graduate study, 196 

Undergraduate progiam, 195 
Geology, Harry Carothers Wiess 

Chair in, 49 
Germanics, 201 

Courses, 202 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Graduate study, 201 

Undergraduate program, 201 
Governors, Board of, 4 
Grade symbols, 67 
Graduate admission, 102 
Graduate, Approval of Candi- 
dacy, 101 
Graduate assistantships, 105 
Graduate Council, 101 
Graduate degrees, 99-103 
Graduate fees, 104 



248 



WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Graduate fellowships, 105 
Graduate areas of study, 99 
Graduate language require- 
ments, 101 
Graduate living expenses, 104 
Graduate oral examinations, 101 
Graduate scholarships, 105 
Graduate thesis regulations and 

procedure, 102 
Graduation, 70 
Grants, 80 
Greek courses, 138 
Guaranty bond, 78 

Hargrove, Reginald Henry, 

Chair of Economics, 47 
Health and Physical Education, 
205 
Courses, 205 
Curriculum, 61 
Health Service, 94, 109 
Health service staff, 35 
High school record, 71 
Historical sketch of the Univer- 
sity, 43 
History, 208 
Courses, 209 
Curriculum, 53, 54 
Graduate study, 208 
Undergraduate program, 208 
History, American, William Pet- 

tus Hobby Chair in, 47 
History, Mary Gibbs Jones Pro- 
fessorship in, 47 
History, Harris Masterson, Jr. 

Chair in, 48 
History of Art, courses, 189 
Hobby, William Pettus, Chair in 

American History, 47 
Honors, 70, 88 
Honor Council, 91 
Honor Societies, 88 
Honor System, 91, 108 



Honor Roll, President's, 68 
Honors and Prizes, Graduate, 

108 
Honors Programs, 53 
Housing, graduate students, 109 
Housing, undergraduate, 76 
Humanities, 215 

Courses, 215 

Curriculum, in Division of, 54 



Instructional staff, 10 

Interviews, 72 

Internship Plan for Student 

Teachers, 154 
Italian, courses, 140 



Jones, Jesse H., Professorship 
in Management, 47 

Jones, Mary Gibbs, Professor- 
ship in History, 47 

Language requirements, gradu- 
ate, 101 

Languages, foreign 

See, Classics, French, German, 
Greek, Italian, Latin, 
Portuguese, Russian, and 
Spanish 

Latin, courses, 138 

Lectures, Rockwell, 49 

Lectures, Rice University, 49 

Lectureships, 47 

Library, 45, 46 

Library Professional staff, 34 

Linguistics, 216 

Literary societies, 93 

Living expenses, 79 

Loans, 86, 87 

Lovett, Edgar Odell, Professor- 
ship in Mathematics, 47 

Majors, approval of, 67 



INDEX 



249 



Management, Jesse H. Jones 

Professorship in, 47 
Martel, Mrs. Mamie Twyman, 

Chairs of Instruction, 48 
Marine Corps, N.R.O.T.C, 64 
Masters of residential colleges, 9 
Master's Degrees, 99, 104 
Masterson, Harris, Jr. Chair in 

History, 48 
Mathematical Sciences, 223 
Mathematics, 216 
Courses, 219 
Curriculum, 56, 57 
Graduate study, 216 
Undergraduate requirements, 
216 
Mathematics, Edgar Odell Lov- 

ett Professorship in, 47 
Mathematics, W. L. Moody, Jr., 

Professorship in, 48 
Mechanical Engineering, 175 
Courses, 176 
Curriculum, 57 
Memorial Center facilities, 95 
Military Science, 63 

Courses, 225 
Moody, Libbie Shearn Profes- 
sorship of English, 48 
Moody, W. L., Jr. Professorship 

of Mathematics, 48 
Music, courses, 226 
Music, Shepherd School of, 49 

Naval Science, 64 

Courses, 226 
New Students, admission of, 71 

Officers of Administration, 3 
Oral examinations, graduate, 101 
Organizations, student, 93 
Parking, 96 
Phi Beta Kappa, 88 



Phi Lambda Upsilon, 88 
Philosophy, 228 

Courses, 228 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Graduate study, 228 

Undergraduate program, 228 
Philosophy and Religious 
Thought, J. Newton Rayzor 
Chair in, 48 
Physical Education 

See, Health and Physical Edu- 
cation, 205 
Physics, 233 

Courses, 234 

Curriculum, 57 

Graduate study, 233 
Pi Delta Phi, 88 
Political Science, 238 

Courses, 239 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Major in, 238 
Political Science, Albert Thomas 

Chair of, 48 
Portuguese, 140 
President's Honor Roll, 68 
Prizes and Awards, 89 
Prizes, Graduate honors and, 108 
Probation, 68 
Probation, Special, 69 
Professional Degrees in Engineer- 
ing, Requirements for, 100, 
102 
Professional Research Staff, 31 
Professional Staff of the Library, 

34 
Programs, undergraduate, 54, 66 
Psychology, 124 

Courses, 124 

Curriculum, 53, 54 

Rayzor, J. Newton, Chair in 
Philosophy and Religious 
Thought, 48 



250 



WILLIAM MARSH RICE UNIVERSITY 



Readmission, 69 

Refund of fees and tuition, 78 

Registration, 66 

Religious Thought, J. Newton 

Rayzor Chair in, 48 
Removal of course deficiencies, 

69 
Requirements for Research De- 
grees, 100, 103 
Research Computation Labora- 
tory Staff, 36 
Research Staff, Professional, 31 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 

63 
Residential Colleges, 45, 76, 79, 

92 
Responsibility, Student, 91 
Rice, David, Chair in Ethics, 48 
Rice Television Series, 50 
Rice University Associates, 5 
Rice University Lectures, 49 
Rice University Research Spon- 
sors, 8 
Rice University Standing Com- 
mittees, 38 
Rockwell Lectures, 49 
Russian, courses, 140, 141 

Science, curricula, 56 
Scholarships, 80 
Scholarships, graduate, 105 
Scholarships, Tuition, 80, 107 
Shepherd School of Music, 49 
Sigma Delta Pi, 88 
Sigma Tau, 89 
Sigma Xi, 88 
Societies, Honor, 88 
Sociology, courses, 120 
Sociology, Lena Gohlman Fox 

Chair of Instruction in, 48 
Spanish, courses, 141 
Space Science, 242 
Courses, 243 



Graduate Study, 242 
Special charges, 77 
Special Probation, 69 
Staff, Athletic Department, 36 
Staff, Health Service, 36 
Staff, Instructional and Re- 
search, 10 
Staff, Library, 34 
Staff, Professional Research, 36 
Staff, Research Computation 

Laboratory, 36 
Student activities, 93 
Student Association, 93 
Student Association Service 

Award, 94 
Student Center, 95 
Student Employment, 87 
Student Government, 93 
Student Health Service, 94, 109 
Student Housing, 76, 109 
Student Life, 91, 108 
Student Loans, 86, 87 
Student Organizations, 93 
Student Responsibility, 91 
Student Senate, 93 
Student Teaching Internship 

Fees, 78 

Plan, 154 
Suspension, Academic, 68 

Tau Beta Pi, 88 

Tau Sigma Delta, 89 

Teacher's certificate, 54, 151 

Television series, 50 

Ten Year Plan, 43 

Theater course, 190 

Thesis regulation and proce- 
dure, 102 

Thomas, Albert, Chair of Politi- 
cal Science, 48 

Transcripts, 78 

Transfer students, admission of, 
75 



INDEX 



251 



Trustees, 4 

Tuition, undergraduate, 77 

Tuition, graduate, 104 

Tuition refund, 78 

Tuition Scholarships, 80, 107 

Turner, Isia and Percy, Profes- 
sorship in Biblical Studies, 
48 



Undergraduate scholarships, 80 

University Associates, 5 

University campus and facili- 
ties, 45 

University, historical sketch of, 
43 

University standing committees, 



Undergraduate admission, 71 
Undergraduate Approval of Ma- 
jors, 67 
Undergraduate courses of study, 

54 
Undergraduate fees, 77 
Undergraduate grants, 80 
Undergraduate living expenses, 

79 
Undergraduate programs, 54, 66 



Voluntary withdrawal, 69 

Watkin, William Ward, Chair in 

Architecture, 48 
Welch, Robert A., Chair in 

Chemistry, 49 
Wiess, Harry Carothers, Chair 

of Geology, 49 
Withdrawal, voluntary, 69